… and then there were none

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Yesterday, chavista muckracker Alberto Nolia called for Henrique Capriles, governor or Miranda and Venezuela’s most popular opposition politician, to be disqualified from running in the 2012 elections.

PSUV strongman Diosdado Cabello, the man Capriles defeated in 2008, is calling for the same.

And Comptroller General Clodosbaldo Russián – the man who can, with one fell swoop of his mighty pen, bar any dangerous opponent from running, no questions asked and no murky due process getting in the way – is pleading for more powers.

As if it wasn’t clear enough yet, chavismo is testing the waters for one of its potential strategies – picking their own contender.

There is little we can do about this, other than worry and plan. But if there was ever an argument to choose the candidate soon, this was it.

If we don’t pick our own candidate, Chávez is going to pick it for us.

The best (and only) thing we can do is raise the cost of this move to Chávez. And it’s much more expensive, politically speaking, to bar the winner of an opposition primary than to bar a potential candidate.

If we don’t speed the plow, if we don’t increase the pressure for primaries soon and raise the cost to those foolishly plotting otherwise, chavismo will knock off any and all of the menacing figures, one by one. Give him enough time and no one will be safe until the only opposition figure left standing is someone completely unelectable.

Primarias ya.

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1 COMMENT

  1. And none of this is being talked about on the news. we’re going straight to hell and it’s all the oppo’s fault. Dinosaurs

  2. “The best (and only) thing we can do is raise the cost of this move to Chávez. And it’s much more expensive, politically speaking, to bar the winner of an opposition primary than to bar a potential candidate.”

    Actually, no. If Chavez bars only one guy (aka, the winner of the primaries), he might pretend he has actual reasons for it. But banning 5 guys in contention would leave him without the slightest pretense of a reason to do it.

    In any case, let me state the obvious: this will not end peacefully. No matter what you do. No matter what you try and when you choose whom to do what. THIS WILL NOT END PEACEFULLY. You should do well stop worrying so much about an election that most likely will never happen and start worrying about learning how to use a gun, and start making notes about all the Cubans living in your area.

    • You know, Lackey, such tactics can cause people to get hurt. Badly hurt. Now, if people take up your idea the response from the PSUV will be to arm the population “just in case” people like you want to destabilize the country.

      I guess that you do not live in Venezuela or you would not make such ridiculous comments based on your own paranoia.

      • “You know, Lackey, such tactics can cause people to get hurt. Badly hurt. Now, if people take up your idea the response from the PSUV will be to arm the population “just in case” people like you want to destabilize the country.”

        Will be? Wrong tense Arturo. Already have is more precise.

  3. Yup, looks like Capriles is heading down the Lopez route to political disenfranchisement.

    The old skool oppo will love this. Who knows how many dirty back room deals they’ll be cutting as a result.

  4. I know it’s not the point you are making in your article, but… What did Capriles R. say when Ruffian got rid of Leopoldo Lopez? If memory doesn’t fail me, I don’t remember hearing a peep. If that’s so, then he is probably getting what he deserves…

    I know that MUD is just a strategic alliance and that they are far away from being comrades-in-arms. They don’t have to. But la Unidad shouldn’t be about trying to dump their so-called-friends when it suits then better. At least, they should be defending their allies in times of need. Because otherwise, it won’t take that long for them to get the same treatment…

  5. If the Opposition is committed to the election process, I still believe it is too early to announce a candidate. We have over a year and half to go till the election. The Opposition will have to craft a campaign that will ramp up expectations that peak at the moment of the campaign. To generate this sort of hope and expectation too early will rob the final peak of its full potential and power. Chavez knows this. That is why he is pressing the Opposition so hard. Don’t fall into his trap!

    • Well of course it’s too early now. After all, these people haven’t had a chance to campaign yet. But 2012 is much too late.

    • Roy, I don’t really think that timing matters to Chavez; he (or his cronies) can act now, or later. What really matters is to watch and wait to see who the front runners are (or will be) and as they emerge, eliminate them, one by one, or in groups, as necessary, using the usual trumped-up charges to do them in.

      Thinking about it, Venezuela’s entered the same twilight zone of “truth” and “reality” that exists in Libya. In that zone, concepts of objective truth and reality no longer apply, and they don’t, in my opinion, in Venezuela. Rather, what’s “true” and what’s “real” exists in Chavez’s, head alone, and that’s all that matters now, for anyone who dares differ with him in public will be discredited, disqualified, jailed, or exiled…

      In a situation such as this, at what point do Venezuelans decide to do something, a la Egypt or Tunisia, or Libya?

      • Tambopaxi,

        Difficult question.

        Hm…let me see:

        Egypt: Oil and gas accounted for less than 7% of GDP and going down. Economy is poor, but it is diversifying.
        Tunisia: population is relatively well-educated (well beyond Venezuelans’ average). Oil and gas exports are non-relevant.

        Venezuela and Libya: feudal societies where people think “the country is very very rich”, where most people have little or no contact with foreigners, where people expect state to clean their toilettes for them.

  6. As I have said before on many occasions Chavez claims the right to choose his own opponent and anyone who rises to high in the polls will be disqualified.

    Eventually we will have some low profile, less popular candidates left over to compete against Chavez.Only if the people are willing to vote for ANYONE but Chavez,by large margins, will we have a chance of winning the elections.

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