1,600 Soldiers vs. One Guarimba in Puerto Ordaz

0

A8Cicpc2The month-long shut-down of the La Churuata neighborhood in Puerto Ordaz seems to be over, after a simply huge military action to lift it. Correo del Caroni’s Maisdulin Younis has an eye-opening write-up: 

Ayer, mientras las cooperativas de limpieza de la Alcaldía de Caroní y de Gobernación del estado Bolívar, recogían las ramas y escombros que tenían los accesos cerrados, los vecinos observaban la situación con repudio.

Entre gritos e insultos, rechazaban la acción. “Queremos una Venezuela libre y no nos vamos a cansar. Van a tener que mudarse a La Churuata, comiencen a traer sus carpas si piensan que esto no se volverá a cerrar. Yo quiero un país libre para mi hija y ese país es Venezuela, no me da la gana de irme de aquí, yo sí amo a Venezuela”, gritaba Marielis Núñez a los miliares que estaban parados frente a ella.

Ms. Younis shows that still and all there are some talented reporters out working in el interior’s dailies. For how much longer, though?

1 COMMENT

  1. For a country whose only real enemies seem to be it’s citizenry, the military sure has some cool combat outfits and gear. They look like action adventure movie stars!

  2. I dunno. Ya kinda stare at THAT photo and wonder, “Is this what it’s come to? Is this the 21st century, politically correct means by which tyranny and social injustice is now fought for? Unarmed kids building barricades and fighting against THESE guys?” All of them are obviously hoping that the international media will take notice, condemn the actions of a low IQ’d former bus driver and demand a new government. Really? Is that the plan? Scary. What did the ancient Greeks do when faced with annihilation by the swarming Persians? Put-up barricades in Athens? Not even Robin Hood would face any of King John’s men without a quiver full of arrows. We’ve forgotten about human barbarity. We’ve ignored the signs of human evil, to our own peril.

  3. Hey are you sure it is accurate to say that the 1,600 soldiers participated in the removal of the Guarimba? The text reads: “En la actividad participó *una parte* de los mil castrenses que arribaron *al municipio Caroní* para reforzar a los 600 efectivos del Comando Regional N° 8 (CORE 8) que participan en las operaciones de restablecimiento del orden público de la entidad,” i.e., *a part* of the 1,000 soldiers that were reinforcing the presence of 600 officers in the whole municipality participated in the removal of the Guarimba, the article doesn’t seem to say how many were directly involved in the operation though…

  4. Completely unrelated, but does anyone know what happened with the resident trolls of the blog? Not sure if they called it quits after Quico’s “retirement” or if it is that they too are just tired of defending the regime… but I sure havent seen them much in the forums lately.

    • Just the other day Hector made a nasty comment, that quite shortly after, disappeared….I think it was erased and I was very happy about that.

  5. There is the incremental strategy, where you apply just the necessary amount of force, and if the doesn’t work, you apply a little more force until you get the job done. If the problem comes back again, you now know how much force to use

    Then, there is the “big gun” approach where you apply overwhelming force to get the job done right away, and then afterwards, apply the minimum amount of force to keep the problem from coming back! However, if that minimum amount of force is not enough, you add a little more, and so on.

  6. “Somos pobres, pero con educacion,” says an inhabitant of “La Churuata”, as she protests to be able to “vivir dignamente…y no tener que hacer cola hasta para limpiarse el trasero.” Meanwhile, other inhabitants nearby, iguales de humildes, pero probablemente sin mucha educacion, se algopean en la santamaria de un abasto en una cola para conseguir alimentos–the crux of the problem in Venezuela today….

Leave a Reply