It’s the kind of story that sounds so far-fetched you think it must be your crazy aunt from El Cafetal exaggerating. But no, we didn’t read it in a WhatsApp cadena, we read it in the Gaceta Oficial (N° 40.950 of July 22, 2016):

Resolución Nro. 9855, mediante la cual se establece un régimen laboral transitorio de carácter obligatorio y estratégico para todas las entidades de trabajo del país públicas, privadas, de propiedad social y mixtas, que contribuya con el reimpulso productivo del sector agroalimentario, estableciendo mecanismo de inserción temporal de trabajadores y trabajadoras en aquellas entidades objeto de medidas especiales implementadas para fortalecer su producción.

That tongue-twister is not actually understandable enough to translate properly, but here’s our go:

Resolution #9855, through which a transitory labor regime is established that is mandatory and strategic for all workplaces in the country, public, private, and of social and mixed property, to contribute to the productive relaunch of the agri-food sector, establishing mechanisms for the temporary insertion of workers in those entities that are the object of special measures implemented to strengthen production.

Our confusion turned into deep concern as we started to untangle the text of the resolution. It’s murky, yes, but it seems to be aimed at creating a temporary mechanism to forcibly send workers on secondment into the agriculture and food sector.

Which workers, exactly?

According to articles 2 and 4, it applies to all workers, whether in the public or private sector,  who are in suitable physical conditions or who have relevant knowledge.

In other words: if you are physically and mentally able to work in the fields, the government can ask —or better yet, order— your company to send you to work out there.

And just to be clear on the obligatory nature of the resolution, article 3 states that public and private sector businesses “are obliged to comply with the strict rule of this administrative act”.

Though the resolution sets the conditions for payment and social protection of workers, it leaves many unanswered questions: how will workers be selected? How will workers express their will to undertake the secondment? What are the penalties for not complying? How will the worker or business owner know they are not complying? What are the tax risks and consequences?

And lurking behind it all, a dark suspicion: isn’t this a recipe for forced labour?

According to Article 2 of the International Labour Organization (ILO) Forced Labour Convention of 1930 (No. 29): “forced or compulsory labour shall mean all work or service which is exacted from any person under the menace of any penalty and for which the said person has not offered himself voluntarily.”

We wish we could say with confidence this will not turn into a Myanmar-style system of Forced Labour, but we know who we’re dealing with. It’s disturbing to realize this is the path Maduro’s’ administration -or is it Padrino López’s?-  has decided to take. However, it’s not surprising.

A couple of days back, an agricultural engineer turned cab driver told us he wouldn’t consider going back to the farm because “they” (the Government) had destroyed everything and mafias were charging more in protection money than he could ever afford to pay. For him to go back to the farm, he said, things would have to change.

“They” —the Government— keep talking about their willingness to work with the private sector, but they do nothing to regain our trust. Forcing workers into the agri-food businesses seems like… well…  las últimas patadas de un ahogado.

In any case, Venezuela’s government is pushing the envelope and might be on its way to joining the likes of Burma and Qatar in the dark arts of forced labour. The human rights implications of the practice are ghastly. Take ”ethnic Rakhine civilians were forced to dig graves and carry supplies for Burma Army forcesor workers at Khalifa International Stadium [flagship World Cup 2022 stadium] are forced to live in squalid accommodation, pay huge recruitment fees and have had wages withheld and passports confiscated”.

According to endslaverynow.org, there are “at least 2.2 million people worldwide in state-imposed forms of forced labor”. Let’s hope we don’t bulk up this number.

57 COMMENTS

  1. Force a Venezuelano to work? Not to worry………Seriously none of my friends or family would participate in forced labor unless threatened with death, and even then I’m not so sure. This transitory labor regime will fall flat on it’s face like many other government initiatives. Nonetheless, I hope the order goes down in history as one more crime against the people from this failed state.

    • Oh, it’s easier than you think, actually.

      Does your family depend on regulated food because your meager salary can only pay for that? Oh, did you know that such food at the “affordable for the poor price” is only available through the clap? And who controls the claps?

      Yep, it’s “do as I command, or STARVE.”

      The question wasn’t aimed specifically to you, OaGG, so it doesn’t matter that you can buy the food and other stuff at black market prices, there’s a lot of people whose only hope to eat is the regulated (or better, almost free) food.

  2. Reminds me of the “corvee” or forced labour system, imposed on French serfs prior to the revolution. It’s a way for the state to impose a tax qon those too poor to pay in actual money.

    Here, the Venezuelan state can no longer pay wages to those who do valuable work. So it forces them, on pain of imprisonment.

  3. Year after year this blog has written about “Las doñas del cafetal” “there super electoral forecast scheme” “radicales” “10 things you’ll love about HCR” “Don’t believe the radicales, Venezuela is a democracy” “No were not like Cuba”

    Well guess what folks? The boggey man already came and destroyed the country. So keep you’re silly “Que bolas” and “they were right” to you’re self. The people that write these stupid articles are the same that immigrate to the states and love Bernie. Because of people like you our country [Venezuela] is bat sh*t crazy and non recoverable, so please, pretty please when you come to the states keep your political thinking to your selves—you guys already destroyed one country, let’s not make it two.

    • I feel sorry for those mocked and wise El Cafetal old ladies too, if only they had heard their aunts and grandmothers instead of ridicule them in the 90’s, they wouldn’t be doing forced labor now. There are so much stories like that in children’s literature, but I guess Latin Americans will never learn. We’d rather give the great leap forward with the helmsman from Sabaneta straight to hell than hearing or old aunts, hehe.

    • It fits Hausmann’s mistake. She posts 7283 youtube videos explaining why venezuela is fucked and the next she does is to support Bernie.

      Sad state of affairs. Venezuelans, including these who write here, are deeply ingrained socialists.

      Doñas del cafetal were right all along, and deserve an apology

      • There’s a left-right axis.

        And there’s an orthogonal authoritarian-constitutionalist axis.

        Trump is much closer to Chavez/Maduro on the authoritarian-constitutionalist axis.

        Bernie is much closer to Chávez/Maduro on the left-right axis.

        To me, the problem with Chávez/Maduro has much more to do with authoritarianism than with leftism.

        To tar Bernie supporters with the ills of the Chavez era is to show the kind of slackjawed rightwing simplemindedness that brought us…well, that brought us candidate Trump.

        • I agree with you in that the left-right model is too simplistic and that there is another axis to consider. However, what you label as “authoritarian-constitutionalist”, I consider statist. By this, I mean that on one extreme, one believes in the power of the state to “do good” and wants the state to have greater power, and on the other extreme one is deeply suspicious of the power of the state and prefers that the state be tightly constrained.

          Bernie Sanders is an extreme Statist. However benign his intentions, he believes in more powerful and intrusive state, and in this, he is also similar to Chavez/Maduro.

        • To tar Bernie supporters with the ills of the Chavez era is to show the kind of slackjawed rightwing simplemindedness that brought us…well, that brought us candidate Trump.

          In his day, Bernie Sanders of Democratic Socialism fame has done his fair share of defending Totalitarian Socialism as practiced in Cuba. I refer you to Sanders in the Vermont Freeman _Cuba: The Other Side of the Story. [1969] [page 5]. Sander’s article was a resounding defense of Totalitarian Socialism as practiced in Cuba. Why would a so-called Democratic Socialist defend Totalitarian Socialism? Inquiring minds want to know.

          Sander’s “main source of information” on Cuba was an article that appeared in Monthly Review, which most would label as at least Marxist. Sanders is not a complete shill, as he points out that Monthly Review left out some important facts about Cuba.

          From the article:
          The facts presented in the article, to be sure, do not tell the whole story of the Cuban situation. They do not tell, for example, about the lack of civil liberties in Cuba..or why tens of thousands (including workers and peasants) have already left Cuba.

          Having made that disclaimer, Sanders went on:
          They do, however, present a side to the Cuban Revolution which is very rarely presented to the American population; a side which needs to be told if Americans are to gain a more intelligent perspective of Castro’s Cuba than they have at present.

          IOW, Democratic Socialist Sanders wanted Americans to “gain a more intelligent perspective of Totalitarian Socialism as practiced in Castro’s Cuba.” Because that is what has been practiced in Cuba since 1959- NOT so-called Democratic Socialism.

          Here Sanders quoted Monthly Review verbatim:
          “The statistics prove that a revolutionary approach to the problem can bring down sickness and death rates in the short space of eight years in a way that is not possible in Latin America without socialism.”

          First: As Sanders quoted Monthly Review without comment, he implicitly agreed with what Monthly Review stated. Second: No one will claim that what transpired in Cuba was Democratic Socialism. What transpired in Cuba was unabashed Totalitarian Socialism.
          So a more accurate statement from Monthly Review would have been:
          “The statistics prove that a revolutionary approach to the problem can bring down sickness and death rates in the short space of eight years in a way that is not possible in Latin America without totalitarian socialism.”

          Second, the Monthly Review quote does not correspond to the facts. The percentage reduction in the crude death rate from 1960-1968 was 19.2% in Cuba, compared to a 19.1 % reduction in Latin America and the Caribbean. [In absolute numbers, Latin America reduced its death rate by 2.3/1,000, and Cuba reduced its death rate by 1.7/1,000]. Monthly Review’s claim that only [totalitarian] socialism can bring down death rates so quickly was and is a false claim, as Cuba’s performance was only slightly better than that for Latin America and the Caribbean in percentage terms, and slightly below average in absolute terms. The following countries had a higher percentage reduction in the crude death rate than Cuba for the 1960-1968 period: Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Venezuela of horrid Fourth Republic fame, Nicaragua, Honduras, Brazil, El Salvador, and Colombia.

          So-called Democratic Socialist Bernie Sanders parroted a false claim about the alleged accomplishments of the Cuban Revolution, in order that Americans “gain a more intelligent perspective” on Totalitarian Socialism as practiced in Cuba.

          I repeat myself: why would a so-called Democratic Socialist parrot a false claim in the defense of Totalitarian Socialism? Just wondering.

          When asked about Venezuela, Bernie has declined comment, probably hoping that his previous stands on Latin America will be forgotten. He couldn’t make a statement favoring freeing political prisoners?

          Death rate, crude (per 1,000 people), % decline 1960-1968
          Latin America & Caribbean (developing only) 19.1
          Costa Rica 28.1
          Dominican Republic 27.9
          Venezuela, RB 24.7
          Nicaragua 24.0
          Honduras 20.6
          Brazil 20.4
          El Salvador 19.3
          Colombia 19.3
          Panama 19.2
          Cuba 19.2
          Guatemala 18.5
          Chile 18.5
          Peru 18.3
          Ecuador 17.6
          Haiti 17.3
          Mexico 16.5
          Bolivia 13.6
          Paraguay 8.7
          Uruguay 0.7
          Argentina -4.7
          http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog/world-development-indicators

        • To tar Bernie supporters with the ills of the Chavez era is to show the kind of slackjawed rightwing simplemindedness that brought us…well, that brought us candidate Trump.

          Bernie Sanders has currently declined to comment on Venezuela. In the 1980s, in his capacity as Mayor of Burlington, Bernie Sanders was not so bashful, as he spent a lot of time defending Cuba and Sandinista Nicaragua. After all, it is very important that a small city in Vermont has its own foreign policy. Or at least that the mayor of a small city in Vermont has his own foreign policy. 🙂

          As Bernie Sanders has declined to comment on Venezuela, he has made no statement about the food lines in Venezuela. However, in his capacity as Mayor of Burlington, Bernie Sanders did make a statement in support of food lines in Sandinista Nicaragua.
          Bernie Sanders: “It’s funny, sometimes American journalists talk about how bad a country is, that people are lining up for food. That is a good thing! In other countries people don’t line up for food: the rich get the food and the poor starve to death.”

          Couldn’t you just hear a Chavista honcho informing the public that long food lines are Chavismo’s guarantee that the rich won’t get all the food and that the poor won’t starve to death? Funny thing, the longer the lines, the less food there is.

          Brought to you by a slackjawed, simpleminded rightwinger who will point out that as Bernie Sanders has defended regimes in Cuba and Nicaragua whose policies have had some similarities to those of Chavista Venezuela- food lines for example- it isn’t so “simpleminded” to bring up Venezuela to Bernie supporters.

          • “Bernie Sanders: “It’s funny, sometimes American journalists talk about how bad a country is, that people are lining up for food. That is a good thing! In other countries people don’t line up for food: the rich get the food and the poor starve to death.””

            DID that guy really said that???

            Ok, kill him with fire.

        • To tar Bernie supporters with the ills of the Chavez era is to show the kind of slackjawed rightwing simplemindedness that brought us…well, that brought us candidate Trump.

          As commenter Marc pointed out, Let’s not forget that Bernie Sanders and his supporters share the same opinion of the Chavistas and Fidel Castro about Dilma’s 100% constitutional impeachment: “coup d’etat”.

          It is easy to document what Bernie Sanders and Maduro have said about Dilma’s impeachment.

          Bernie Sanders on the impeachment: “To many Brazilians and observers the controversial impeachment process more closely resembles a coup d’état.”

          Maduro on the impeachment “I have no doubt that behind this coup is the label ‘made in USA,’” President Nicolas Maduro said in a speech on state TV.
          I copy and paste what I previously wrote, to keep comments in one place:
          Yup, it’s really an example of “slackjawed rightwing simplemindedness” to see resemblances between Bernie Sanders and Maduro, especially when they have very similar opinions on the impeachment in Brazil.

          Crickets from Quico. if Quico doesn’t want discussion on his Sanders comment, then Quico should not have brought up Sanders several weeks ago, a time when it was obvious that Sanders was dead in the water. I suspect that Quico didn’t really care about Sanders- he just wanted to insert a crack about “slackjawed rightwing simplemindedness.” Which, given his education at Reed, is no surprise.

          Quico, there are now three well-documented examples which show it is anything but “slackjawed rightwing simplemindedness” to connect Bernie Sanders and Maduro, but crickets from you.

        • To tar Bernie supporters with the ills of the Chavez era is to show the kind of slackjawed rightwing simplemindedness that brought us…well, that brought us candidate Trump.

          In the 1980s, in his capacity as Mayor of Burlington, Bernie Sanders was a vehement supporter of the Sandinistas.The Sandinistas were, in turn, vehement supporters of Soviet Imperialism. In March 1980, within three months of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, 5 Sandinista Comandates made a trip to Moscow and signed a Nicaragua-USSR Proclamation Joint . An excerpt follows.

          “The Soviet Union and Nicaragua resolutely condemn the campaign that the imperialist and reactionary forces have launched of building up international tension in connection with the events of Afghanistan, a campaign aimed at subverting the inalienable right of the people of the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan and other peoples of the world to follow the path of progressive transformation.”

          This is not the only example of Sandinista support of Soviet imperialism. In 1982, Robert Czarkowski, a Polish national, entered Nicaragua with a valid tourist visa. Nicaraguan authorities arrested Czarkowski at the border on suspicion of belonging to Solidarity. After five months of imprisonment, Czarkowski was set free. His book, De Polonia a Nicaragua [From Poland to Nicaragua], tells his story.

          It is far from “slackjawed rightwing simplemindedness” to point this out. Was Bernie Sanders aware of the Sandinistas being vehement supporters of Soviet imperialism? If Bernie Sanders was aware of the Sandinista stance on Soviet imperialism, and said nothing, Bernie Sanders was not and is not exactly the very model of modern Democratic Socialism that you and others claim. If Bernie Sanders was not aware of the Sandinista stance on Soviet imperialism, Bernie Sanders was and is a fool. Rather like a PSF, no?

    • Thank your for this comment sir, much needed…can’t believe it’s fucking 2016 and people still make that old “middle class self loathing” joke about the doñas del cafetal, that naturally, was created by chavismo. Between this, the honeymoon posts, the payed subscription service for “insider info” and Juan endorsing Trump, this whole thing has gone way way down the drain.

      On the Trump/Sanders comparisons, i think it’s just as stupid to being a venezuelan dissident and voting for either, one is a radical populist, the other one is a radical leftist, Chávez was both at the same time.

  4. This is deeply disturbing. The language of the resolution discusses workers as though they are the PROPERTY of the referenced public and private enterprises. They might as well be talking about trucks or tractors. There is no mention whatsoever of the rights of the workers.

    • And who said workers have any rights on chavista socialism? Those subleties are only for effemitane burgueoise rich sifrinos!

  5. Time was when it was very chic for US radicals to go to Cuba to assist in the sugar cane harvest. Perhaps George Ciccariello-Maher can come down to Venezuela and lend a hand to the effort. In 1970, Fidel made a big effort to have a sugar cane harvest of 10 million ton. The Ten Million Ton Sugar Harvest (La Zafra de los Diez Millones)This effort included “voluntary” labor.

    In addition, the absence of qualified personnel in the administration and technical sectors of the mills and in the fields, was often compensated by appointed personnel from the Revolutionary Armed Forces (Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias, or FAR), staunch revolutionaries, yet mostly ignorant regarding sugar production. Out of the estimated 350,000 individual who worked as cane cutters in the 1970 harvest, 100,000 were members of the FAR. Professional cane cutters numbered 50,000. The rest was comprised of voluntary workers from all sectors of the economy and society, including students, athletes, professionals, housewives and Cuban cabinet members. The shortage in the number of experienced cane cutters created irreparable damage to the harvest. The inadequate cutting performed by hundreds of thousands of workers, taken to the cane fields as volunteer laborers, produced several negative consequences.

    The harvest fell short of 10 million tons. According to the article, the 1970 harvest was 7.558 million tons. According to FAO stat, 8.29 million tons – 4.38 million tons in 1969. The big motto for the campaign was “Los diez millones van,” variously translated as “Ten million on the way” or “The ten millions go.” [Former translation by Jose Luis Llovio-Menendez in “Insider:My Hidden Life as a Revolutionary in Cuba.”] One could modify the motto to “Los 10 millones van a Miami si pueden.” [Ten 10 million Cubans go to Miami if they can.”]

    • Ironically, in that same year, there was a bumper sugar harvest all over the world, causing prices to plunge. In spite of the increase over the previous years’ sugar production, Cuba did not increase it’s actual revenue in hard currency significantly as a result. And, on the negative side, because so much of Cuba’s resources and labor were redirected toward sugar production, the rest of their economy was neglected costing them far more in the long run than they made on the “Great Sugar Harvest”.

      All in all, yet another spectacular failure for state-run economies.

      • All in all, yet another spectacular failure for state-run economies.
        During the 1980s, when the Soviet Bloc still provided a protected market for Cuban sugar, Cuba’s annual sugar production fluctuated between 7-8 million tons. After the loss of its Soviet sugar daddy, Cuban sugar has had trouble competing on the open market. Maybe operating with sugar cane refineries that haven’t been updated since 1959 just might be a factor. The Soviet Union also used old production facilities in its manufacturing. Sugar production in 2014 was 1.8 million tons, which is an increase from averaging 1.28 million tons from 2005-2010.

        Probably the most egregious example of the failure of Cuban agriculture is its milk production. From 1961 to 2013, milk production in Latin America increased from 18.2 million metric tons to 85.6 million metric tons, an increase of 370%, or 4.7 times greater than in 1961. From 1961 to 2013, milk production in Cuba increased from 350,000 metric tons to 589 metric tons, an increase of 70%, or 1.7 times greater than in 1961.

        So much for Ubre Blanca. Or was the CIA shooting Cuban milk cows? 🙂

        http://faostat3.fao.org/home/E

        • Obviously, the CIA is shooting the cows in Venezuela too. But, curiously, they only shoot the milk cows, but leave the cheese cows.

  6. Trump is actually more like a moderate Democrat, something in between Eisenhower (r) and Bill Clinton on econ policy.

    You can’t judge if he would be authoritarian because he has never held office, you’re just guessing. Obama has been very authoritarian, signing a lot of unconstitutional executive orders, after FDR has been most overturned president by the Supreme Court. You’re judging Trump because of his big un p.c mouth, be it’s just that, rethoric.

    Don’t know of a place where socialism has been implemented without an authoritarian state, maybe you could enlighten me? Nordic states don’t count.

    Right wingers brought us chavez? Haha there are like 10 right wingers in Venezuela, the road to serfdom is what brought us to here.

    Saludos,

    • I’m sorry? And why don’t Nordic states count? Because they reflect positive Social Democracy? Take your right-wing blinkers off, my friend. There is a huge difference between actual Social Democracy and the totalitarianism practiced by self titled ‘Socialist’ regimes such as the USSR, Cuba and Venezuela.

      • There is a huge difference between actual Social Democracy and the totalitarianism practiced by self titled ‘Socialist’ regimes such as the USSR, Cuba and Venezuela.

        I suggest you see my posting on Bernie Sanders’s defense of Cuba, a country which NOBODY has called an example of Social Democracy. Cuba is an example of Totalitarian Socialism, and Bernie Sanders has defended it.

        So-called Democratic Socialist Bernie Sanders parroted a false claim about the alleged accomplishments of the Cuban Revolution, in order that Americans “gain a more intelligent perspective” on Totalitarian Socialism as practiced in Cuba.

        I repeat myself: why would a so-called Democratic Socialist parrot a false claim in the defense of Totalitarian Socialism? Just wondering.

        Since Bernie Sanders considered food lines a good thing in Sandinista Nicaragua, than why wouldn’t he believe the same thing about Chavista Venezuela?

        Bernie Sanders: “It’s funny, sometimes American journalists talk about how bad a country is, that people are lining up for food. That is a good thing! In other countries people don’t line up for food: the rich get the food and the poor starve to death.”

        Links are provided at my comments below.

        • Free for the downloading: Manipulism and the Weapon of Guilt: Collectivism Exposed.
          Manipulism and the Weapon of Guilt: Collectivism Exposed is the utmost controversial exposé and carefully detailed description of the awful emotional mind game that facilitates communism, socialism, social-liberalism and fascism, known as collectivism. The book exposes Denmark, the supposed happiest nation on earth, for what it truly is: collectivism’s biggest propaganda hoax. Danish author Mikkel Clair Nissen tells the hidden facts and realities of life in Denmark’s democratic-socialism that they never want you to know.

  7. The revolution is failing and it is time for the sequel to the Cambodian massacre. I cannot imagine disillusioned, hungry Venezuelans who are already dying of malnutrition and lack of medical care now being literally forced into slave labor in the hot sun where many will probably die. Anyone who opposes communism will usually end up dead in a totalitarian state like Venezuela is becoming, and the people who grow the food will never get to eat any of it. This is Stalinist-Leninist communism rising to kill again while the rest of the world watches TV and obsesses about KIm Kardashian’s butt. Turn your rakes and hoes into spears.
    Gracias, Papa Fidel.

  8. “,,estableciendo mecanismo de inserción temporal de trabajadores y trabajadoras en aquellas entidades objeto de medidas especiales implementadas para fortalecer su producción.”

    Trabajaores y trabajadoras? LOL.

  9. Embajadores y embajadoras, musicos y musicas, politicos y politicas, lisensiados, y licenciadas, corruptos y corruptas, chavistas y chavistoides, embajadores y embajadoras, ministros y ministras, rameras y rameros, licenciados y licenciadas, politicos y politicas,. chamas o chamos, ministro o ministra, presidente o presidenta. limpia botas o limpio sin botas. Eso vaina deberia cantarse en un reggae song.

  10. I was born in El Cafetal and left for the US when I was a toddler. This was the 1970s so I remember next to none of it.

    Can somebody explain to me what the recurring “Aunt from El Cafetal” callback is about? Is El Cafetal now full of doddering conspiracy theorist shut-ins or something? 🙂

    • The whole “Crazy old lady from El Cafetal” joke was created as a stereotype to ridicule and oversimplify the earliest opposition against chavismo and dismissing those people as high-class hysterical snobs who were just throwing a tantrum because they were disgusted of the poor and couldn’t stand the “regular people being treated as human beings” and thus bit on their handkerchiefs.

      The stereotype was carefully constructed by the chavista propagandists, picturing the opposition people as frail, annoying and over the top melodramatic old ladies that only complained and over reacted all day long even when they supossedly lived in the richest part of Caracas, the so called “east”.

      The characterization of everybody that wasn’t chavista into what’s basically the most hated kind of person in Venezuela allowed the chavizmo’s polarizing hatred-loaded-speech to permeate deeply into the society very easily.

      In the later years, Chávez would come with more elaborate insults and labels, each of them most likely planned in Havana, as chavismo is just an extension of castro-communism, those insults and labels would be used to dehumanize any dissention to the regime so its enforcers could slaughter them as we have seen so far.

      • So similar to what was done in Brazil, the oppositionists were labeled “pessimildos” (pessimists), the government even did several aggressive criminal ads portraying the “pessimildos”, always grumpy, always saying that everything the government does sucks and would backfire (they were right!).

        In this one the Pessimildo talks about the Olympics, for example:

        https://youtu.be/TbOSa0KTQks

        Pessimildos and El Cafetal aunts know what they are talking about, they should form a political party, they would have my vote.

    • Ulamog explanation is great. the other thing is they were always saying all this would become Cuba, with ration systems etc…And the rest were “I don’t believe it, Venezuela is not Cuba” Oh well now we are right there…without a ration card but with the captahuellas and a day that you could buy certain basic stuff according to your id number!

  11. At a more fundamental level, this is just, exactly, “patadas del ahogado”, the thrashing of a drowning man.

    Even dismissing all the important and fundamental aspects of how this is wrong… you dont fix a production problem by yanking people “temporarily” from their actual jobs and throwing into something they dont know how to do (even menial work needs practice to be done well, fast, and without screwing). You only ensure substandard work, higher rate of accidents, etc.

    • I don’t think is any patadas de ahogado…this is how they show they still have control…How do you think this would be used? Not really for production it would be a sistematic way of punish people that they find annoying or not aligned with the revolution…it is very easy to see it…they just need to take some students, some doctors, people that are rebelling against the party and Comez style….”work”

  12. the resolutions assumption that employers can just redeploy their employees to new tasks totally different from those they perform and were hired to perform is incredibly naive , in a collective contract situation for example changing an employees job description and placing him in an entirely new job can result in a lot of resistence and both legal and sindicate probles ……this is a labout contract and law situation , Employers arent as all powerful as the resolution assummes……Funny for a Workers govt to miss on the labour aspects of this resolucion , a resolution cant pass over collective bargaining agreements , established labour practices and labour regulations …..the implications of changing a persons job description are complex in terms of hourly scheduling and pay. There is also the problem raised where a person is deployed to work on agricultural projects while their old jobs become vacant , finding a replacement can be difficult and sometimes near impossible…….!!

    This govt is full of people who indulge in magical thinking , you issue a resolution and presto reality is like dough that bends to your whim……..they are always too sold on the power of declamations to change reality to suit their desires……..!!

  13. You really think they would use this for that objective or they will use this to choose some people , specially those who dare to complaint about the government? they only need to take a few…in certain parts pf society…it does not matter what they are going to grow!!!

  14. Is the author of this post the same mental midget that wrote the post that we should let chavismo destroy the country for the “good” of it?

  15. Lo único que iguala darle la razón a la izquierda radical, es dársela a la derecha radical.

    Alaridos. Es todo lo que escupen. Alaridos.

    No se adjudiquen una reconocimiento que no es suyo, los alaridos nunca ayudaron a nadie. Pudieron tener la razón, pero la verdad nunca la blandieron. Saltaron derechito a las conclusiones. Pocos se tomaron el tiempo y la paciencia de diseccionar objetivamente el movimiento y esos pocos que lo hicieron son estos mismos que en este blog escriben. Mis felicitaciones a ellos.

  16. I’ll be happy to comply with this directive, as long as I am the one who decides which employees go.

    I have about 30 out of 150 employees who simply clock in, read the newspaper and fart for 8 hours, then clock out and go home.

    We’ve tried every way we can think of to get them to move on, but as a few have told us, they’re not quitting no matter how much we offer them.

    I can see a golden opportunity here in “fiscal assistance” for the government pukes that will be the ones deciding who goes to the cane field.

      • Well, chavistas won’t fully believe we are in a dictatorship until they experience it first-hand, so like I said about their blind stupid hatred, you just have to point them away from you, because you can’t stop them.

        I laugh at how many chavistas will stop being chavistas when they’re forced to work under a scorching sun during hours and very possibly getting beaten by a bunch of sadistic thugs dressed as soldiers.

  17. Well, at least Nicolás has not executed his uncle with a 14.4mm machine gun.
    So, Venezuela is better than North Korea in this regard.

    • But his putative father was executed by Fidel using the cuban pseudo-doctors.

      Which is, kinda worse when you think about it, because the uncle at least didn’t feel a thing after he bit the bullet, but it’s said that the corpse was agonizing horribly until he kicked the bucket on december 30.

Leave a Reply