The Caracazo is history, but it is also one of our founding stories: a narrative that marked a before-and-after moment in the lives of all those who lived through it. Today we launch a three part series that reflects the Caracazo’s two faces, weaving the history of the Caracazo as recounted by Rafael Osío Cabrices (marked ROC) with one of the many personal stories of the Caracazo as remembered by Cynthia Rodríguez (CR)

CR: “Please, stay here with me. Let’s play here, the three of us. Let’s bring some toys and hide here.”

I must have told my sisters something like that. The little one was only 7 months old, so I just grabbed her in my arms. The other one was 7 years old. I don’t know how much she really understood. I didn’t understand almost anything myself, actually. I was 13 and I just followed my dad’s instructions: “if you hear plomo o gritos, just grab your sisters and take them to the corridor. And don’t move. Don’t go anywhere else. Don’t open the door. We will be back as soon as we can, but I don’t know how long it’s going to be.”

And plomo I did hear. From the back street. I didn’t think. I just grabbed my two little sisters and told them to stay there and wait. We waited a long time. A long time. I couldn’t help thinking what would happen to us if mom and dad were at that place where the plomo came from. And I prayed.

It was March 1st, 1989.  

ROC: It’s a foundational myth for chavismo. A usual suspect in the search for the date when Venezuela stopped being a nice country. A collective trauma. The 27F — or more precisely El Caracazo, because events didn’t end that February 27th — is one of those moments in our past we don’t want to talk about, they are too painful. Like the Vargas disaster in 1999 or the 2002-2003 PDVSA strike. But it’s unavoidable if you want to understand how Venezuela became what it is today.

El Caracazo has attracted all sorts of interpretations. Let’s focus on the facts.

Many Venezuelans really were mad in 1988 and the beginning of 1989. The press and the walls were full of anger. It was normal to see hooded radicals clashing with police one or more days a week in the accesses to Ciudad Universitaria in Caracas. There was even a discreet, now forgotten attempt at a military coup, two months before the December election, led by an Army officer, J. D. Soler, who was jailed and pardoned (yep) after trying to take Miraflores one night with a couple of tanks. Things were bad: that same month, 14 unarmed fishermen in Apure were killed by a police and military task force who mistook them for Colombian guerrilleros.

The present was ugly, so millions of people tried to board a time machine to the past by voting for Carlos Andrés “El Gocho” Pérez. They hoped for a return to the “Saudi Venezuela” that existed before the so-called Black Friday in 1983, when the bolivar collapsed under speculative attack and the US dollar went from Bs.4.30, the exchange rate it had for 22 years, to Bs.7.50.

CAP ran on a promise to make Venezuela great again, after five years of economic decline and corruption scandals (like discretional sales of preferential US dollars to government’s friends. Yep, again.) Those who voted for him expected another consumerist orgy like the one Venezuela enjoyed during his first administration in the 70s. It wasn’t to be. Though oil prices were about the same that in 1977, the national debt was twice the size of the international reserves, and there were many more people around.

Few could foresee that instead of jacuzzis filled with Scotch and El Puma songs, we would have blood and gunfire.

When elected President on December 1988 with 52% of the votes, CAP had in mind a completely different program: his “Gran Viraje” platform of economic liberalization, dismantling controls, privatization, competition. He threw a great big party for his inauguration, on Feb. 2. Even Fidel was there. Days later, he said we were broke.

For the first time in history, a Venezuelan government sought a deal with the International Monetary Fund. In exchange for a loan of $4.3 billion, the IMF demanded a set of measures that the Venezuelan press christened as the Paquetazo: among others, some allowances to the poorest, price hikes in all but 18 cesta básica items, taxes and cuts of subsidies for everyone.

On Sunday Feb. 26, after days of nationwide violence among radical students and police, the government announced gas prices would rise 30%. That implied bus fares would go up too. On Monday Feb. 27, a protest in Guarenas made the country explode, to the surprise of everyone: the government, the ultra izquierda, the police, the ordinary people.

There are many things we don’t know for sure, and most likely we won’t know ever. To the confusion of those circumstances, we must add the censorship on the media once the government decided to tackle the crisis, and the deliberate obscurity the same government threw over the events in order to shirk its responsibilities. Weak institutions did little to deliver justice, and later administrations -Caldera’s, Velásquez’s and Chávez’s- were definitely more interested in using El Caracazo as a rhetorical weapon than in prosecuting and punishing the officers guilty of abuses and compensating the victims’ families.

We don’t exactly know, for instance, how many people died. The official death toll is 276. The human rights NGO insist that victims could have been more than 1,000. 27 years later, El Sacudón is still opaque, a family’s taboo we prefer not to discuss in detail, like a Father’s Day when a drunk uncle went crazy and beat his wife to death.

For those who remember those days and nights, the memories are as fresh and moving as a last night’s nightmare.

CR: We lived in La Pastora, a quiet place at that time. It was like a pueblo and I have somehow idealized those childhood years. The church, the Plaza Real, the Escuela Parroquial I went until 6th grade. The bodegas where we got simple things like toilet paper, harina PAN and refrescos… That night, I went to the window immediately. I had never heard screaming like that. I glanced a multitude running by the Puente Miraflores, doing something I couldn’t understand: they were moving carritos full of goods from the corner’s abasto.

My mom was as shocked as I was, but she had a word for that. She said to my dad, with fear: “¡Amable, están saqueando!”.

Dad told me to get off the window and to sit still at the living room. They started coming and going by the apartment, speaking nervously, making phone calls. I remember asking what saquear -that word that would then enter my vocabulary forever- meant.

Then came the real shock, when my mom explained to me that they were stealing food in the abasto they used to go everyday, the one we also used to shop in.

“Pero, mamá ¿por qué hacen eso?” That question still resonates in my mind because it wasn’t answered then. Many years would pass until I came to understand why they were doing it. By then, it was too late”.

ROC: It’s an accepted fact that all started in the morning of Feb. 27, 1989, in the city of Guarenas, 20 minutes from the Eastern tip of Caracas. It was a quarrell like many we can see today in Venezuela —none of the people involved could have imagined that they were changing their country’s history. A bunch or ordinary citizens argued with some bus drivers about the new fares they were demanding for rides to the capital, Bs.16 to Caracas, instead of  Government-approved bs 10. Things turned ugly. A group set a bus on fire, someone broke a window and looting started. Miranda police couldn’t stop the riot, so Caracas’ Policía Metropolitana and Guardia Nacional were called in to help.

The TV reporters were there, and for the following hours there would be a lot of live broadcasting of the riots, which attracted many more to join the looting. People saw the news, or listened to the radio, and started doing the same in Caracas. There were shortages of some basic groceries at the time, and according to the government, those items were being stocked by store owners who were waiting for a price increase decree to put them back on the shelves. Looters went for those things, and for TV sets, clothes, whisky, toys, anything, first in modest grocery or liquor stores, then in supermarkets and shopping centers.

CR: I had to contrast my memories with mom’s because sometimes I’m not sure if what I link to the 27 y 28 de febrero events actually corresponds to those dates or to the other zaperoco situations we lived later (I’m talking about 1992 4 de febrero and 27 de noviembre).

She tells me that her most vivid recall is the horror that watching our neighbors saqueando in real time brought to her.

She adds another detail that I didn’t catch then: there was a group of motorizados. She could see that they were in charge of the saqueo. They pulled apart the santamaría of the grocery store and entered, and they took out everything and laid it out on the street. And the people grabbed the things directly from there.

Now I see that it’s not an unimportant detail.

ROC: We call it El Caracazo because the capital was the main theater and the main source of victims. However, starting at noon on Feb. 27 the contagion reached dense commercial areas in La Guaira, Los Teques, Maracay, Valencia, Barquisimeto, Maracaibo, Mérida, San Cristóbal, Puerto La Cruz and Puerto Ordaz. Police, GN and DISIP were unable to stop violence also there, that in some cases -according to the government- was kindled by radicals from universities or public high schools.

By the morning of Feb. 28, looters were at ease in western and central Caracas. Clearly outnumbered, the Policía Metropolitana seemed paralyzed, thus the riots spread. No political leader was conducting the violence. Some streets and avenues in Central and Western Caracas were blocked by barricades or burning buses and trucks. It was a feast of rage and also joy, desperate poverty and pragmatic opportunism. Police and soldiers were there, but doing nothing; they were waiting for orders. Meanwhile, from the barrios in the slopes of the mountains surrounding the Caracas valley, the poor descended in masses. Finally, the prophets of disaster were right: “el día en que bajarán los cerros” had come. 

Taquito CMárquez

 

 

 

 

This is part I of a three-part series. Part II will be published on Wednesday

64 COMMENTS

  1. Excelente artículo y excelente idea el hablar de todo esto durante esta semana. La primavera árabe empezó con un frutero tunecino al que insultó y robó la policía, el caracazo por unas personas discutiendo el precio del autobús… Nadie sabe cual será el motivo de la siguiente explosión social pero previsiblemente tendrá que ver con cosas tan “irrelevantes” como estas. Las sociedades son sistemas complejos y una mínima variación provoca movimientos enormes si se vuelven lo suficientemente frágiles. La sociedad venezolana está dividida, fragmentada y difícilmente puede estar más débil. Lamentablemente entonces solo se puede articular y funcionar como una unidad cuando sigue la dinámica que impone el caos, no en función de principios rectores que le darían un orden determinado a ese cambio.

  2. Expect a deluge of comments about how it was all 100% planned by Cuba and absolutely nothing, nothing was “spontaneous”.

    The Cuba meme is now the CIA meme of the reverse polarity.

    • “The Cuba meme is now the CIA meme of the reverse polarity.”

      Because Cuba and the Castros have done nothing at all to interfere in anything in Venezuela, ever, no sire.

      Keep believing that ridiculous thing about the “bravo pueblo” that turned into an omnicidal bunch just because they got a bus ticket raise, when the last like 20 years have laughed (For not saying much more scatological verbs) on that theory.

      Bus tickets are like 20000% more expensive today than in that time and NO ONE’s looting nor burning the country for that.

      Gasoline also got the spectacularly ridiculous raise of about 95000% and NOBODY said a peep about it.

      • Fidel Castro and CAP met frequently. These meetings where private and usually took place in Margarita but also La Orchilla. The relationship was cordial and the meetings where strictly between those two. There was nobody else within earshot. Those meetings produced many results such as Cubans resettling in Venezuela ane the Spain ETA’s getting safe haven and new IDs in Venezuela. The ETA’s had strict rules to abide. When Chavez came into power, everything was scrapped

    • You know why “nobody has said anything” (with nobody being a lot of already nasty scrapes in queues, maybe?)

      Same reason the Caracazo never repeated even if everybody spent months worrying about it – the thing scared everybody shitless.

      The “Bravo pueblo” bullshit does not get fixed by the “it was all orquestrated from Cuba!” bullshit. We get then to the same stupid position as the chavistas, in which absolutely everything is the CIA and the Imperio and absolutely nothing happen without them.

      Whatever role agitators and hard-left militants had, it just overtook them quickly into a 100% Venezuelan happening of utter, absolute chaos.

      • I know why nobody has said anything, two reasons exactly:

        1) The whole “people gets pissed and spontaneously burns half of the city because they’re raging maniacs” is a complete and absurd lie, the average Pedro Pérez / María Rodríguez in Venezuela is peaceful and fears getting caught by any thug in an uniform.

        2) No one is there instigating the idiots to come and raze the city.

        In 1989, there WERE people instigating the marginals to go and riot, they were the ultra-leftist hyper marxist idiots that received even weapons from Cuba and whose purpose was to undermine Venezuela’s government power enough until the point that the Castros managed to seize the country through Chávez, they’ve been doing that since the 60s after the guerrilla pacification. There is even proof of snipers killing people from the january 23 buildings and the infamous malandro that killed Felipe Acosta, the murder that triggered the brutal military repression that ended in dozens killed, because let’s face it, the law enforcers ONLY go in a killing rampage when one of them bites the dust.

        The whole “the thing scared everybody shitless.” is also a lie, why is exactly that it scared people? No one seems to explain it in a convincing way, everybody who I have read speaking about the issue only claims that “the slums came down”, what are they scared from exactly? The government slaughtering people, or the “savage hordes” that supossedly came to destroy everything? The impotence-compensation myth about “the pauper sagaves” that replaced education and civility with brute force and thus could come and kill every single middle class person any time they wanted? The people in Venezuela is actually more scared to protest against chavismo for the slaughter Chávez ordered in Llaguno Bridge in the april 11.

        It’s not that the “movement overtook and got out of hand” from the instigators, the way it developed was EXACTLY what they wanted to achieve, to create destabilization in the recetly appointed government, have an excuse to topple it and replace it with a regime loyal to the Castros, which was what happened with chavismo today.

        There was a LOT of opportunists there, true, but that alone doesn’t make the whole thing a “spontaneous movement for the people’s emancipation against the evils of the IMF”

        • The fact that it was not a movement for the people emancipation from the FMI doesnt mean that your tesis is proven.

          It was a total breakdown, for God’s sake. If you think the full extent of the thing was planned by anybody, you are just being paranoid. If you think the extent of what happened was in anybody calculations, you are paranoid.

          That people like Chávez (and hey, Caldera for a while) where able to capitalize on it for their own goals is 100% true, and that they would want to portrait it as something it wasnt, is also true.

          Those days the usual suspects were doing their usual things, and neither them nor anybody else was thinking the whole thing was going to go ballistic as it went. As proven by the fact that NOBODY took any control of the situation or presented any kind of political angle to it till later on when the more savvy opportunists saw how to exploit the trauma.

          But hey, at this point, you are just going to repeat some paranoid rambling and I’m not going to convince you of the opposite, so …

          • Yeah, dude, keep believing, that Cuba only meddled in Venezuela’s affairs after 2005 when Chávez openly acknowledged himself as a marxist nutjob.

          • Ulamog is correct. Castro always played both sides even while CAP in power and they where meeting regulary. Castro would bring rifles in the hold of his planes.

  3. With age details become unclear, but I still remember where I was when I realized something was wrong.

    I was in El Marqués and my idea was to take the bus to El Llanito where I lived. And there I was when I see a great, great deal of people walking, almost but not quite running, from the general direction of Petare toward us. Lots of them, and lots of them looking scared.

    I then decided to go to a friend’s house that was very near and just ask my dad to come for me.. and there is where they told me what was happening, how their father was holed up in the factory, how the whole city was going crazy. Dad came for me hours later and then I spent days at home, with the small arms noise as background.

    Till much later, when it was replaced by something more machine-gun like, and then silence, which I gather was our small corner of Plan Ávila …

    • It wasnt a political uprising , it was basically a mass uncontrolled looting spree , a largely spontaneous explosion of unlawfulness , by people who no longer recognized ordinary authority and instead felt a sudden rush to engage in the ennactment of thrilling acts of mob violence……what Miranda would have called a Bochinche…..!! Of course there was an element of anger against certain recent govt measures …..and without doubt some conspiratorial stoking by groups antagonistic to the govt. At the core however we see more chaotic acts of happy pillaging than of serious political rebellion …., its been said before, there was in much of it the spirit of children opening up a fallen pinata……!!

      On a personal note I wasnt in Caracas when it happened , I was in an Amsterdam hotel preparing for a business meeting the following morning , then the phone rang and I heard the voice of a friend living in New York asking me ‘have you heard the news’ when I confessed my ignorance he told me about what was happening in Caracas, I became very alarmed at my family in Caracas and tried many many times to contact them without success, my friend called again and offered to connect me to my family via a direct line owned by the company he worked for , he finally got me thru and I was able to talk to my family , they were OK , had enough victuals to stay the emergency and the disturbances had not reached anywhere close to where they lived……., my father in law however had gone thru a scary moment , my wife had loaned him our driver to take him to Caucagua on a small errand,.as he was coming back they unexpectedly saw themselves in between a violent mob of shouting people at the back and a line of national guards men (including a tank turret in the very middle of the road) at the front, the driver very coolly kept going at a sedate pace , went round the tank turret and brought my father in law safely home…….!!

      That night a group of office collleagues who were to accompany me to the next days meeting arrived at the hotel , they were huffed and frightened , they told me that as they were about to enter the tunnel in Caracas on their way to the airport a mob invaded the ccs /maiquetia highway and begun burning tires and stuff to stop the traffic to the airport from flowing ….then all of a sudden a group of armed men came from behind their car and started shooting at the mob clearing the way for them to get to the airport ……!!

      When we took our way back home , the airline (Swiss Air: God Bless them) called us to say that because of conditions in Venezuela they were rearranging the trip home so we could get there before the curfew…….. , so we flew first to Zurich , spent the night there at a very nice hotel and went of to Caracas the following day in time to avoid the curfew and get to our homes in time…!!

    • At some point some very simple considerations entered into a lot of people’s minds – it was either I loot, or somebody else loots it, so better if it is me. Tomorrow I’m not going to be the only güevón here without stuff.

      That of course was supported by the outlook that is still ingrained, that of “we should be rich, if we are not is because somebody else stole it from us”. If that is the “truth” you use to understand anything, then of course it makes sense that the moment is cost-effective for you (low personal risk in the middle of that chaos) the moment you decide to do what you imagine your enemies have done to you… If, after all, all signs of prosperity are understood to be because everybody with money is corrupt and steals , then well, is my turn.

      Those nasty ideas of un-community, of everybody for themselves, we had been living with them for years but a lot of us never expected to see them explode in our faces like that; we still thought Venezuela was this modern democracy, a peaceful place of institutions and laws… and it took very few hours to undo that mirage and return to a more primitive but real Venezuela. Or maybe we middle-class people just found out in what real Venezuela were most people living. In any case, it was just the end of the illusion.

      • “That of course was supported by the outlook that is still ingrained, that of “we should be rich, if we are not is because somebody else stole it from us”. If that is the “truth” you use to understand anything, then of course it makes sense that the moment is cost-effective for you (low personal risk in the middle of that chaos) the moment you decide to do what you imagine your enemies have done to you… If, after all, all signs of prosperity are understood to be because everybody with money is corrupt and steals , then well, is my turn.”

        Communist brainwashing, the hardcore leftists that gleefully killed soldiers and cops were gnawing at the people’s brains, inserting those absurd propaganda lies during years after the armed raids failed.

        “…we still thought Venezuela was this modern democracy, a peaceful place of institutions and laws… and it took very few hours to undo that mirage and return to a more PRIMITIVE BUT REAL Venezuela.”

        Ah, well, now that I read this, I can see why you stick so stubbornly to the whole chanvista reasoning that “people in Venezuela is bad, stupid, cheating and barbaric because it’s in their DNA”

  4. It would be good not to left out the fact that Fidel smuggled a crapton of weapons to distribute among the many ultra-leftist radicals that were holed and infiltrated in many sectors of Caracas that later contributed to exacerbate the violence racking a lot of kills themselves.

    • Don’t forget to mention Castro’s goblings infiltration in AD leaders minds, in order to be controlled by reptilian-led military, that later were betrayed by Chávez cronies; as the latter inoculated Castro’s mind with just enough fervor to quit using goblins and reptilians as spies.

      From those days I remember a great quote by Francisco de Miranda. It said: “Dale a tu cuerpo alegría Macarena”.

        • So, I guess you don’t like trolls.

          Here’s my ultimate point, and I thank you that you mentioned the previous point on Cuba-CIA, because it allows me to state the following:

          Cuba has intervened in other countries before? Yes. Did the CIA intervene in other countries? Yes.

          Does that make the causes of Caracazo to be utterly related to foreign intervention? No.

          It cannot be assumed, because there’s no hint of documented proof to suggest it. Many social events happen espontaneously, and that viral, violent and immediate spiral of social reactions can be triggered by something small, simple and unexpected. And the complexity of these events, is that the same causes in the futures don’t cause the same social reaction necessarily (in contrast to 2016’s context vs El Caracazo). Or at least not in the same way.

          • “It cannot be assumed, because there’s no hint of documented proof to suggest it.”
            Neither there’s any hint of documented proof stating otherwise, so I’m not sure why you think that is black and white.

            After Venezuela guerrilla laid down their weapons various “urban guerrilla” appeared and lasted for many years in areas like 23 de Enero, they still exist and continued to be “armed to the teeth to defend the people”, so it isn’t impossible that they collaborated to some point to ignite the looting, even if after some point it got out of hands for everyone.

        • The article gives you documented sources, and explains partly the reasons of the social contagion from Guarenas’ protests. It is very different to say that ultras ignited in an orchestrated way the Caracazo, to say that radical groups “mounted the wave” (se montaron en esa ola) of the social explosion. In the former, your putting these small groups as intelectual designers and main cause. In the latter, the groups take advantage of the social unrest once it happened.

          The documented evidence, in spite of many events yet uncertain, point to the latter option, rather than the former. And there’s enough empirical and documented evidence, not only in Venezuela, but several Latin American and other developing countries about these kind of event being triggered in spontaneous ways. That’s why the term can be used as social explosion. It can happen without notice, for whatever reason and it can be contagious to other geographical areas or socioeconomic groups. To give “the credit” of Caracazo to a bunch of radicales, as if they were the intelectual designers, is simply too much, if we relate to all the documented evidence of those days.

          • “To give “the credit” of Caracazo to a bunch of radicales, as if they were the intelectual designers, is simply too much, if we relate to all the documented evidence of those days.”

            On that I completely agree, they weren’t intellectual designers by any means but they definitely put their grain of sand to accelerate the events.

            In your first comment you seemed to mock the idea that they could have helped in some way to fire the events and I see that a little naive, but the way you write your opinion in this last comment I can agree with you.

      • “Don’t forget to mention Castro’s goblings infiltration in AD leaders minds”

        In your pathetic attempt to make fun of what I said (Proof that you aren’t right and thus have to go by the tangent, typical chavista style), you forget that the AD ideology is actually very rooted in communism, with their staunch support for the “strong government that protects the poor from the evil rich enterpreurs” mindset

        “…that later were betrayed by Chávez cronies”

        Actually, the only thing that chavismo hasn’t betrayed, was precisely Cuba and the Castros, that IS why people is starving and dying from easily curable diseases today, chavismo prefers to pay tribute to their masters rather than helping the venezuelan people.

        “…Castro’s mind with just enough fervor…”

        How naive from you, are you going to claim that Castro is just a poor victim from the big, mean ol’ empire too? You seem to ignore that he was more than willing to sacrifice all the cuban people if that meant he could destroy the USA in the Missile Crisis.

        Try another time so you don’t ashame yourself this much.

        • All, Ulamog is correct. You all should know by know that what we DONT know is more than what we know. Does anyone here really think they had the inside track on those events? That you can understand what happened because you where there and you read the newspapers and watched TV? GIVE ME A BREAK. There is more that we don’t know than what we know. SAME GOES FOR 11A. I can talk about 11A all day long and nobody would know what the hell I’m talking about.

          • No, it wasn’t “trolling”, you just made a fool of yourself and are trying now to play the “I was just kidding!” card to save some face.

            Dude, you just crashed face-first on a concrete wall, pick up your teeth from the masonry, stick your jaw back in place, and deal with the ridicule you are making now.

  5. I was 9 years old at that time, I remember that we were dismissed from school early in the afternoon and was told to immediately go home so I quickly walked without really understanding what was happening (I lived and studied a few blocks away from Av. Baralt in Caracas). It wasn’t until early evening that I started to get a grasp (for a 9 years old) about the situation when we learned that my dad was stuck hiding after closing the local he had at the time because people was going crazy in the streets and he wasn’t sure if he was a good idea to walk home alone during the frenzy.

    That same night of 27th people looted the supermarket that used to exist in front of the building I lived so I remember how quietly and afraid I watched people getting out with shopping carts full of products and some with the cash registers in the cart, there was even people carrying entire cow legs on their shoulders. I also remember people running with fridges, beds, stoves and more from a furniture store that was a block away, it seemed so difficult to run carrying those items but that didn’t seem to stop them anyway.

    I think I’ll never forget any of those images in my head.

  6. Kepler insists “it is well known” that the riots were a well planned and orchestrated left-wing conspiracy. I would be very interested in reading evidence of this.

    • Vanessa Davies, Blanca Eekhout were some of those detained then. They had weapons. They were active in the extreme left movements.
      Any normal student of the UCV who had some eyes back then could see what was happening: the extreme left kept infiltrating student events, shooting at cops and hiding behind students.

      I could see, like many other friends, how these guys tried in early 1988 to provoke violence when the huge university march went to Caracas’ city centre. They joined the march at the Helicoide in spite of students’ desperate attempts to expel then. When everyone arrived at the city centre, the extreme left started to destroy shops and the police went after the students. That was early 1988, things became more and more tense from then on. We could see after that how the extreme left kept becoming more aggressive and provoking bloodier clashes. They were using in a very systematic way every single action that reeked of “adjustment” (including the attempt to raise meal prices at the UCV cafeteria from practically nothing to almost nothing)

      Just one of several views:

      http://informe21.com/blog/carlos-penaloza/verdad-caracazo

      Of course no one could know exactly how it would end but the extreme left were systematically intervening to provoke riots and blood letting. They had been trained to do so. I have linked several times to an original document about how PCV members had been trained by the KGB (and G2 did that more often)

      I translated one of the typical documents from Russian years ago, a document dissident Bukosvsky brought to the West. I copy here a fragment:

      “El Secretario general del Partido Comunista de Venezuela (PCV) T. J. Faría se dirigió al Comité Central del Partido Comunista de la URSS con la petición (OP N° 2954 del 10.X.1980) para la organización del curso de entrenamiento especial de trabajo ilegal y conspiración para el activista del PCV T. J. Lenin Moreno.”
      The Russian word I tried to convey before “trabajo ilegal” is “спецподготовка”. It has a very specific meaning in the Russian world…it is not just “any” special training. It is about the use of violent force, special forces.

      • You can present a truckload of proof to these people, yet they’ll happily dismiss it as pure “conspiranoia”, just because for some twisted inescrutable reason they don’t want to admit that it was planned from Cuba to topple the Venezuelan government.

        • Am I being included as one of “these people” you mention? Can we PLEASE stick to discussing ideas and REFRAIN FROM PERSONAL ATTACKS????

          • I wasn’t referring specifically to you on that comment, but seeing that you’re so eager to get a reply from me, well:

            You see, Kepler just presented evidence in his comment, evidence that you will zealously ignore just because it doesn’t fit your “poor little Cuba hasn’t done anything ever to Venezuela, it was just the mean snob middle class’s fault” and “the Venezuelan people have murderous savages slumbering deep inside, don’t mess with the brave people! Durrr Huurrrr!” ideas.

          • You probably should have just said: “No, I find myself unable to refrain from personal attacks.” By the way, did you know that “rhetorical question” is not in the dictionary?

      • Kepler.

        Am I correct to assume that the far left vandals and provocateurs were doing these things in an effort to cause the police to crack down and thus radicalize more students and young people? To provoke an overreaction by the state to legitimize it and turn the pueblo firmly against it?

        Thanks

  7. Why don’t we see a massive “Caracazo” today? Because most of us rebels are gone, living in other countries, and because the locals still left are intimidated by the criminal regime and their armed forces and jails. So no more “Caracazos” of any kind, until the Chavistoide corrupt military and guardia and police are eviscerated.

    • No, we don’t have the same “movement” today, because it was NOT a spontaneous thing, but it seems that there’s some people here that desperately wants to latch to the ridiculous theory that that disaster happened by “natural causes”.

  8. Nothing uniquely Venezuelan about this. We have the same situation here in the US. It has happened before, and it will happen again.

    I don’t know if firearms are legal in VZ. And if they aren’t, does everyone have one anyhow? Has everyone there armed themselves for the next El Caracazo?

    Here is the US, the private firearms do keep a limit on the spread of out-of-control rioting and looting. Looters would run in to a lot of trouble if they traveled to suburbs and started attacking them. It effectively limits the damage to dense urban areas. The rioting after the Rodney King trail damaged most of the black neighborhoods in LA and other US cities.

    This never made a lot of sense to burn down your own neighborhood because you are upset. Also in LA, we saw a photos of lots of people running down the streets with stolen TV’s and stereos because they were upset after the Rodney King trial. It sounds like VZ is no different.

    • What happened in LA in 1992 was a completely different scale than Caracazo, nor did it come anywhere near to shaking the country (and being a major event in the collective psyche of Venezuelan politics) like Caracazo did.

    • Weapon permits are illegal and suspended in Venezuela for civilians since the power void in 2002, it was made as part of the ridiculous charade were Chávez wanted to present himself as the sanctified victim of the violent coup from the “Cafetal crazy old crones”.

      It also had the purpose of disarming the civilian population in general so the only ones with firepower would be the chavista death hordes (known as bolivarian circles in the 2002, then the reserve, then the militia, and now the colectivos, actually the irregular army composed by regular criminals working as exterminators for the regime)

    • I was in L.A. during the riots. I do remember that people used private weapons to protect their businesses, by placing armed guards on top of the buildings at night. This helped to prevent the riots from spreading. However, the key to controlling the situation was the quick response of the police and the early and effective enactment of a curfew.

      In Venezuela, private ownership of guns is minimal, except for the criminals, who are heavily armed.

  9. I have discussed this a lot of times:
    “We don’t exactly know, for instance, how many people died. The official death toll is 276. The human rights NGO insist that victims could have been more than 1,000”

    First: Chavismo did not want to have an independent research on how many victims there were.
    Usually, Chavistas prefer to put high numbers: 3000, 5000 people.

    The thing is: where on Earth were the relatives of those people? The vast majority of people in Venezuela – but for a few isolated cases – have relatives and those relatives would report people missing. There is no such a list.

    My guess is that the real figure is very close to the official one.

    Paradoxically, the brother of a notorious Chavista, Luis Felipe Acosta Carlez, was one of the military killed by the extreme left thugs who were in the cat-and-mouse game during those days.

    And that is what that thing was: cat and mouse where those doing the killing would one day be acting as military and the other day as “revolutionaries”

  10. The Caracazo is one reason we are in the throes of a catastrophe today , the experience was so traumatic that it made the abolition or diminution of irrational subsidies or of absurd price controls almost impossible to conceive…..for fear of another caracazo , to this day there is nothing that is more feared by the regime, if CAP and the following govts had been allowed to dismantle price controls and the clientelar system of subsidies both direct and indirect we would have been in much better shape to avoid the ascent of Chavez…….!!

  11. I will speak in spanish because I´m very exhausted about the Caracazo´s conspiracy myths and I prefer express in my native language.

    A ver, a ver. Si el Caracazo hubiera sido una conspiración orquestada por Fidel y el G2, ¿POR QUÉ COÑO NADIE FUE A SAQUEAR MIRAFLORES, EL COUNTRY CLUB O ALGÚN MINISTERIO? Ni siquiera se atrevieron a ir por las grandes empresas o las sedes de los partidos. El Caracazo fue una simple revueltica en contra de los pequeños propietarios (sí, los PEQUEÑOS propietarios) y los supermercados. Una guachafa que no hubiera llegado a tanto si la TV no hubiera mostrado alegremente, por todo un día, a gente saqueando impunemente y si el gobierno no hubiera sido tan lento en actuar. A la gran mayoría de saqueadores no les dio la cabeza para ir por más, pese a que podían hacerlo, pese a que habían grupos malandros con sus propias armas participando en el saqueo. El Caracazo fue una revuelta de cobardes que solo saquearon lo que podían saquear sin arriesgar el pellejo. Una verdadera revuelta hubiera ido a Miraflores, a Fedecámaras, a las casas de AD y COPEI, al Country…

    Acaso Fidel es tan estúpido como para no organizar un movimiento dirigido directamente contra los “responsables” de la crisis: CAP, el FMI, Fedecámaras (y las empresas que la conforman), AD y COPEI… ¿que narrativa épica puede extraerse de una revueltica que solo jodió al panadero de la esquina? CAP pudo llegar tranquilamente a Miraflores en la noche del 27F sin que nadie intentara atacar al convoy presidencial, ¿que más quieren?

    Ese es uno de los motivos por los cuales hoy no hay, por ahora, un nuevo estallido. Porque la gente sabe que -al menos- la guardia nacional sí va a dar pelea y llevarse por delante a unos cuántos antes de lograr sobrepasarlos y obligar a la activación del Plan Ávila. Sin embargo, es solo cuestión de tiempo de que se colme el vaso y todos estemos tan desesperados que prefiramos morir luchando que esperando el tiempo perfecto de Dios.

    • No entiendes hasta el día de hoy qué es lo que la extrema izquierda ha hecho desde hace más de un siglo en todo el mundo.

      Sí, la mayoría de la acción fue de gente que quería saquear para obtener sus televisores, sus computadoras, lo que fuera. Y saquear, saquear, saquear. Y esa muchedumbe fue azuzada a ello por grupos con armas que esperaban la reacción del gobierno.

      La esperaban como siempre lo han hecho, desde tiempos de la Rusia zarista.

      En qué consiste en “ir contra el FMI”? Crees que Fidel ha traado alguna vez de “ir contra el FMI”? Qué es eso? Cómo se come?

      Entiende: un movimiento de izquierda extrema jamás ha querido tumbar a un gobierno a través de un cambio directo de personas. Saben que esto no tiene suerte. Lo que siempre siempre, en toda la historia, han querido hacer, es causar que el gobierno reprima a las masas para tener la justificación de que están contra un régimen sangriento y que lo que sigue es legítimo: más violencia y golpes.

      • “¿En qué consiste ir contra el FMI?” Consiste en, por ejemplo, ir a Miraflores a derrocar al “traidor” que había “entregado la soberanía” al FMI. En ir a los ministerios y apoderarse de ellos y saquearlos. En saquear las casas de AD y COPEI para destruir a los partidos que habían destruido al país. En ir a saquear Fedecámaras. En ir a saquear la oficina del FMI en Caracas (cuya ubicación sin duda era conocida por nuestros amigos conspiradores). En ir a saquear el Country Club y las urbanizaciones ricas.

        Aunque si lo dejamos en ir “contra el gobierno, el bipartidismo y los ricos que nos jodieron” también es válido. Y nada de eso pasó, excepto por unos pocos que sí tuvieron los cojones de intentar asaltar el Country. Que yo recuerde, Lenin tomó el palacio de invierno, no se ponía a armar revuelticas para hacer quedar a Kerensky como un represor, pues a fin de cuentas es mucho mejor para tu narrativa épica presentar una revuelta contra el gobierno y los ricos, que contra el panadero de la esquina. Y sobre el Domingo Sangriento, sería el colmo de la idiotez decir que unos manifestantes pacíficos con iconos que solo querían entregarle un papel al zar eran malvados comunistas.

        Por algo Chávez se pasó tantos años intentando re-escribir la historia del Caracazo para que fuese eso mismo, una revuelta contra el FMI y contra CAP, que es precisamente lo que no fue. Y ya que hablamos del galáctico, fíjate que la mega-conspiración de Fidel escogió precisamente una fecha donde el MBR-200 no podía mover un dedo y el mismo Chávez tenía rubéola. No más que uno de los cuatro que juraron en el samán de Guere (el hermano del general Eructo) murió reprimiendo a los saqueadores.

        Si en verdad hubo una conspiración para intentar derrocar a CAP (o al menos generar el suficiente caos para obligar al gobierno a reprimir en masa y que quedara CAP como el que reprimió a quienes se le oponían a su gobierno), fue una cosa más chapucera que el plan chaburro promedio, y para nada esperable de una supuesta mente estratégica como la de Fidel, pues les salió como el culo.

        En general, estoy de acuerdo con Jesús Couto Fandiño, y lo más que pudo haber hecho la izquierda esos días fue estimular disturbios, como igual hacían, por cierto, grupos malandros y otros pirómanos. Ya otra cosa es que luego intentaron re-escribir el Caracazo como la historia de una revuelta contra CAP.

        • Realmente crees que me refiero al Domingo Sangriento? No. Hubo muchos otros episodios de violencia. Lo mismo pasó en Alemania.

          No entiendes. No se trata ni de que se pongan a luchar contra “panaderos”.
          Se trata de poner a las fuerzas del gobierno a matar a gente común.
          Lo hicieron también en Colombia durante la Violencia.

          Para qué crees que hacía esto la Unión Soviética con los comunistas venezolanos?
          http://www.bukovsky-archives.net/pdfs/terr-wd/ct236-80.pdf
          Para qué?

          • En Rusia hubo muchos episodios de violencia, es verdad, durante la revolución de 1905. Pero, y acá viene lo relevante, eran episodios aislados motivados por el hambre más que otra cosa. Cuando los revolucionarios (llámense bolcheviques, anarquistas o social-revolucionarios) hacían algo violento, no se limitaban a joder a los pequeños negocios, si no que . Sobre todo si esa operación violenta era a gran escala y no solo saquear dos o tres negocios/fábricas y listo.

            En efecto a la izquierda le vino de perlas que CAP tuviera que sacar al ejército a matar a gente común. Pero si ellos hubieran sido los que organizaron el Caracazo, porque no trataron de atacar las instituciones de gobierno para así dejar bien en claro que la cosa iba contra CAP y no contra los panaderos? Acaso les convenía para su narrativa victimista que la gran revuelta planeadísima ni siquiera se acercó a Miraflores o al Country Club? Total, que justificación moral hay para no matar a unos delincuentes saqueando negocios? No era mejor mostrar al ejército matando a quienes intentaban derrocar al “traidor” CAP y tomar Miraflores?

            Si en efecto el plan de la izquierda era no tocar específicamente al gobierno, los partidos y el Country, que coño ganaban con eso? Lo único que “ganaron” (porque ya quedó claro que no fueron ellos los que prendieron el peo) es que en su momento todo el mundo le jalara bolas a Ítalo del Valle Alliegro por restaurar el orden. En buena medida el Caracazo no se ha repetido porque en el barrio aún no se ha olvidado lo que era realmente el Caracazo, una revueltica malandra que solo jodió a las pequeñas empresas.

            Repito, el papel de la extrema izquierda en el Caracazo no pasó de ayudar a prender disturbios y ya, que no pasarían de quemar un autobús y unos cauchos. No una revuelta a nivel nacional que amenazó el orden social de todo el país.

            Ahora, responde con claridad. Explícame claramente porque la extrema izquierda no quería tocar Miraflores ni el Country. Ese es el gran hueco de los mitos conspiranoicos sobre el Caracazo.

          • “Ahora, responde con claridad. Explícame claramente porque la extrema izquierda no quería tocar Miraflores ni el Country. ”

            Porque los comunistas NUNCA tocan directamente los puntos más fuertemente protegidos del enemigo, de hecho, en una guerra, SIEMPRE SE BUSCA EL ESLABÓN DÉBIL y se ataca desde allí. Es como hacen los terroristas, ellos siempre van tras los civiles indefensos, porque es más fácil provocar más daño matando civiles desarmados que a soldados que sí se pueden defender.

            En el caso de Venezuela, su eslabón débil era la población ignorante y fácilmente manipulable a la que se le lavó el cerebro para que salieran ellos mismos a crear caos y destrucción contra el objetivo que era el gobierno venezolano.

            Todos los saqueadores, todos los malandros, todos los asesinos y todos los que se rifaron tiros ese día eran CARNE DE CAÑÓN para los comunistas, que seguramente se estaban desternillando de la risa al enterarse de lo bien que les había salido su gracia.

          • “En el caso de Venezuela, su eslabón débil era la población ignorante y fácilmente manipulable a la que se le lavó el cerebro para que salieran ellos mismos a crear caos y destrucción contra el objetivo que era el gobierno venezolano.”

            Objetivo que ni siquiera fue tocado. Ni una sola casa de AD o COPEI, ni una sola urbanización rica, ni un solo ministerio, fue tocado. Puros negocios pequeños. Lo único grande que se saqueó fueron supermercados y algunas medianas empresas de tecnología. O es que en esa época los que mandaban en el país eran los panaderos portugueses de la esquina?

            O es que acaso todas las urbanizaciones ricas, todos los ministerios y todas las casas de AD y COPEI eran puntos fuertes que iban a ser defendidos a sangre y fuego? O es que como ahí era posible que hubiera dos o tres tipos armados que ofrecerían resistencia ya era demasiado para el todopoderoso Fidel, el temible G2 y los ñángaras de la Central?

            Que conspiración más chimba, coño. Con sus pajas conspirativas solo dejan peor a la extrema izquierda, como unos carajos que intentaron hacer algo grande y les salió tremenda chapuza.

    • La pregunta no es que hicieron los grupos de extrema izquierda. Coño, hicieron lo que hacen, igual que el morrocoy hace lo que hace, la lapa hace lo que hacen las lapas…

      La pregunta es que peso se le pone en el Caracazo. Y el peso va a ser muy poco a priori.

      Ellos hacian lo que llevaban años, décadas haciendo, pero resulta que ese dia de ese año la situación tomó su propia mecánica que nadie esperaba. Se salio de los canales del típico “voy a quemar un autobus en la Central”.

      Que fueron muchisimo mas listos a la hora de recoger los frutos del caos posterior, si, no cabe duda, y de mitificar el acontecimiento según su religión ideológica, también.

      Pero eso no hace del Caracazo una conspiración ejecutada y orquestada por la extrema izquierda. Lo dicho, la extrema izquierda de aquel momento ni se imaginaba la suerte que iba a tener, y la mayor parte de la violencia y el caos no estaba ni dirigido ni canalizado ni impulsado por nada mas allá de la podredumbre de la sociedad venezolana y la destrucción de toda apariencia de que, de verdad, habia una tal sociedad.

      Lo dicho, tanta paranoia con como todo todo todo fue una operación cubana no deja de ser la version de “derecha” de la estupidez de “izquierda” de que todo en Latinoamerica es cosa de la CIA, una visión empobrecedora y pasiva en la que todo parte de un enemigo omnipotente y omnisciente y los factores de la realidad del país desaparecen… y asi no hay culpas ni errores ni nada, todo es culpa del enemigo.

      La “extrema izquierda” no llevo al país a una situación en la que miles de personas que no sabrian ni decir que coño es el marxismo se pusieron a saquear. La “extrema izquierda” no llevo al país a la ruina económica que sembró el descontento y la rabia que luego, si, supieron canalizar e instrumentalizar. La “extrema izquierda” no alimentó sola los mitos de la riqueza petrolera infininta y su corolario de si tu eres pobre es porque te robaron – eso lo hicieron AD y Copei. Y un largo etc.

      Que si quieres pensar que ese sector “enemigo” aprovechó mucho mejor la oportunidad, eso es evidente. Que estaban jugando a lo de siempre, también. ¿Que TODO el Caracazo fue algo que planearon y ejecutaron? Ni de casualidad.

      Rio revuelto, ganancia de pescadores, pero su capacidad de revolverlo en ese momento era bastante limitada. Tuvieron la suerte, y el país la desgracia, de que si ellos jugaban con cerillas el resto del pais estaba empapado en gasolina esperando arder, pero ni siquiera fueron los únicos pirómanos.

      • (Jesus le doy un poco de que sonreir con mi mas menos que mas espanol aqui, y que no tengo el text para ponerle accentos.) Muy acertado, si. La situacion economica ya existia, y esa era el tinder, la madera para la fogata de protesta. ?Como llego todo a ese punto de rabia? – pues, fue el mal-gobierno, y (por mi) las grandes equivocaciones (malandreadas) de las hypothesis socialistas. Puede que alguien o algunos de Castro, o de quien sea communistas agitadores, le prendieron la mecha. El “trabajo” – y eso que por mi, es el “trabajo sucio” – ya se habia hecho, creando un chaos economico y emotional. Muy acertado, que fue y es de decadas.

        You need a spark to the tinder. IMO the communist / socialist “philosophy” is that mankind is inherently a “bad boy” which requires strict control – but does not realize that, so you have to stir things up and show mankind he needs YOU to bring militarized force and chains to HIM to force him to behave “socially”. It’s just so screwed up, it’s hard to fathom how anyone can be so twisted as to not see that the most prosperous countries are “capitalist free market”.

        Se ciegan a todas las maravillas y avances y prosperidad desdes los 1600, que es cuando empeso la idea de formacion de capital y venta de acciones publicas. (The 1600’s, under the truly great economically-enlightened Queen Elizabeth I, one of the greatest monarchs of all time, were the start of shipping insurance for commercial voyages around the Horn of Africa to the Far East, in a tea-house where shippers went, called Lloyd’s of London. As well, was the idea of selling shares of expected profits from voyages, so hundreds could contribute small amounts of capital and get a proportional shares of expected profits. That idea became the basis for capital formation and was very notably developed and extended by Alexander Hamilton with the founding of the American Stock Exchange, where those shares could be actively traded.)

        It wasn’t until Marx and Engels and that “crew” of mass murderers that you got chaos. We could have shot them, and spared tens of millions of massacred bodies, and hundreds of millions living in dirt-poverty under the guns of malicious, grinning, idiots.

        For sure, the poor and uneducated do not have the advantages of the wealthy, or even of the upper 50% of the population. For sure, you need something to promote, to offer the often confused lowest “classes” some direction that works. And how to do that is the problem. One of the best solutions is to keep open incentives and free markets. There is a new multi-millionaire Mejicano here in the U.S. who started a hotdog stand by raising all the money he could ($5,000, I’m told) from friends and family in Mejico. A poor Italian immigrant by the name Giannini started Bank of America on a card table in the streets of NYC.

        Man is not perfect by any stretch of imagination, and we still deal with greed and corruption and a host of other sins – at ALL levels of society. But destroying capital and markets and reducing EVERYONE to poverty is not a solution. The “Mega-Caracazo” of communist “revolution” is NOT a viable solution. Y punto con eso.

      • ** “La pregunta no es que hicieron los grupos de extrema izquierda. ”

        >> No hacer esa pregunta es evadir responsabilidades y repartir impunidad (La putrefacción central de Venezuela hoy en día), si un carajo sacó una pistola y mató a un trancazo de gente, no se puede salir a decir después que “la pregunta no es lo que hizo ese que saió echando tiros.”

        ** “Coño, hicieron lo que hacen, igual que el morrocoy hace lo que hace, la lapa hace lo que hacen las lapas…”

        >> Lo cual es, desestabilizar gobiernos a través de conspiraciones, terrorismo y guerra de guerrillas para tomar control de los países y extender el dominio cubano para al final mantener impune a Fidel y sus compinches.

        ** “La pregunta es que peso se le pone en el Caracazo. Y el peso va a ser muy poco a priori.”

        >> A esto se le llama “es que no lo creo porque no me da la gana y ya”

        ** “Ellos hacian lo que llevaban años, décadas haciendo, pero resulta que ese dia de ese año la situación tomó su propia mecánica que nadie esperaba. Se salio de los canales del típico “voy a quemar un autobus en la Central”.”

        >> Sus movimientos eran calculados, se llevaban años preparando la desestabilización carcmiéndole el cerebro a la gente con propaganda vendepatria a la gente que descuidaron los gobiernos, que estaban a su vez infiltrados también por agentes que se dedicaron a que esa población fuese abandonada, no fueron solo un grupito de parásitos quemando busetas en las puertas de la Central.

        ** “Que fueron muchisimo mas listos a la hora de recoger los frutos del caos posterior, si, no cabe duda, y de mitificar el acontecimiento según su religión ideológica, también.”

        >> No fue oportunismo, es que ese era su objetivo desde un principio.

        ** “Pero eso no hace del Caracazo una conspiración ejecutada y orquestada por la extrema izquierda. Lo dicho, la extrema izquierda de aquel momento ni se imaginaba la suerte que iba a tener, **

        >> La suerte no tiene nada que ver con nada acá, fué planificado y calculado, se estaba azuzando a la gente y en los principios de los disturbios se asesinaron a unos cuantos para decirle al resto que salieran a quemar la ciudad.

        ** “…y la mayor parte de la violencia y el caos no estaba ni dirigido ni canalizado ni impulsado por nada mas allá de la podredumbre de la sociedad venezolana y la destrucción de toda apariencia de que, de verdad, habia una tal sociedad.”

        >> De nuevo con la excusa chavista de “Es que como todos los venezolanos son pupú, entonces fue que hicieron eso, porque todos están tan podridos como nosotros.”

        ** “Lo dicho, tanta paranoia con como todo todo todo fue una operación cubana no deja de ser la version de “derecha” de la estupidez de “izquierda” de que todo en Latinoamerica es cosa de la CIA, una visión empobrecedora y pasiva en la que todo parte de un enemigo omnipotente y omnisciente y los factores de la realidad del país desaparecen… y asi no hay culpas ni errores ni nada, todo es culpa del enemigo.”

        >> En cambio prefieres ignorar la verdad, que es que el enemigo, Castro, quería invadir a Venezuela para saquear el petróleo y mantener su dictadura, mezclándola con la cantaleta izquierdosa ridícula de que “todo lo malo es por la CIA” y eliges la excusa ridícula de que “Todo el mundo tiene la culpa, incluyendo al que le quemaron el negocio y le arruinaron la vida porque ALGO HIZO PARA MERECÉRSELO, porque ese también es impuro.” Sí, excusita chavista de nuevo.

        ** “La “extrema izquierda” no llevo al país a una situación en la que miles de personas que no sabrian ni decir que coño es el marxismo se pusieron a saquear.”

        >> Sólo que pasaron años lavándole el cerebro a la gente que el gobierno descuidó.

        ** “La “extrema izquierda” no llevo al país a la ruina económica…”

        >> En parte, sí lo hicieron, porque elementos del comunismo infiltrados e infectando la estructura del gobierno presionaron y lograron que todo fuese más centralizado y para frenar y rebotar cualquier reforma que implicara una mejora en la vida de la gente (que por mucho que te duela, la respuesta era, y es, capitalismo)

        ** “…que sembró el descontento y la rabia que luego, si, supieron canalizar e instrumentalizar. ”

        >> Como dije antes, era todo parte del plan, hacer que la gente se arrechara contra el gobierno para luego salir a decir que la masacre era prueba de que el gobierno era malo, y dar una excusa posterior para derrocarlo y establecer la dictadura comunista después.

        ** “La “extrema izquierda” no alimentó sola los mitos de la riqueza petrolera infininta y su corolario de si tu eres pobre es porque te robaron – eso lo hicieron AD y Copei. Y un largo etc.”

        >> Sí lo hizo, de hecho, la ultra izquierda se BASA en ese mito, de que el “papá gobierno fuerte” puede resolverle TODO al “pobre estúpido que ni sabe caminar sólo”, la mentira de que “tú eres pobre porque el clase media te robó” es una de las falacias de la teoría de la GUERRA DE CLASES, piedra fundacional del comunismo. Y por cierto, carajito, AD y Copei fueron partidos que surgieron y basaron su acervo ideológico EN el comunismo (“El gobierno fuerte que protege a los pobres indefensos de los ricos malos y que debe intervenir y controlarlo todo”), sin contar con que AMBOS partidos estaban que hervían de comunistas de los más retrógados y talibanes que hoy son los chavistas más recalcitrantes de todos, ejemplo: Aristóbulo.

        ** “Que si quieres pensar que ese sector “enemigo” aprovechó mucho mejor la oportunidad, eso es evidente. Que estaban jugando a lo de siempre, también. ¿Que TODO el Caracazo fue algo que planearon y ejecutaron? Ni de casualidad.”

        >> El que tú quieras negar que el Sol sale todas las mañanas por el este no va a provocar que un día salga por el sur.

        ** “Rio revuelto, ganancia de pescadores…”

        >> Siempre he hallado específicamente recalcitrante, insultante y que demuestra un increíble complejo de superioridad, por decir los adjetivos más suaves de todos los que pienso en este momento, que la gente se las tire de inteligente hablando con ese tipo de expresiones como para decir que “son más venezolanos que los demás”, como si eso fuera a darles la razón. Es como esa persona cuya forma de hablar, de expresarse o simplemente su cara, dan unas ganas increíbles de acomodarle un puñetazo.

        **” …pero su capacidad de revolverlo en ese momento era bastante limitada.”

        >> Pasaron años en eso, que tú no lo hayas visto es tu peo.

        ** “Tuvieron la suerte, y el país la desgracia, de que si ellos jugaban con cerillas el resto del pais estaba empapado en gasolina esperando arder, pero ni siquiera fueron los únicos pirómanos.”

        >> Nadie más tenía ningún motivo para hacer eso, el querer empeñarse en esa hipótesis absurda sin ningún basamento de que fué algo espontáneo porque “la gente no se la calaba más” es hasta racista si se le examina un poco más de cerca.

  12. from my buddy ex Disip Comisario Ramon Rivero who was jefe de escolta de CAP: The looting was incited by the leftist groups of the day due to lack of police presence because the cops where on strike. Ramon arrived with CAP in Maiquetia and upon being received by the Minister of Defense, Ramon ordered CAP to Miraflores while he took the wheel of another vehicle to see for himself. During the drive, Ramon had to pull his service firearm (Glock 9mm or .45) to get through. He had some folks in the car who later recounted the events for El Nacional.

  13. The actions of MBR-200 loyalists where atrocious. One of their leaders got shot and killed chasing someone into a house. The perp got away. In reprisal, the military went to the local hospital and took away all the wounded never to be seen again. I think it was two or three guys they took away thinking one was the shooter.

  14. Narco-General Nestor Reverol is Mama Cilia’s favorite general. They are business partners. It was Mama Cilia’s idea to name him Minister of Defense but that got scrapped after DOJ leaked the narcotics indictment. This is a cocaine cartel top to bottom unlike anything the world has ever seen. They make Medellin, Cali, Sinaloa, and Gull look like cub scouts. The United States IS in secret war with Venezuela while BRV is in open war with America. Narcotics is their achilles heel. They can run but they cannot hide. Expect Cuba to intervene.

  15. The indictment of gneral Reverol as a drugtrafficking ring master helps make the US sanctions appear abundantly justified ……….that and the revelations about the narco sobrinos are transforming the image of the regime into that of a narcoregime , these are no longer speculative jurnalistic allegations but legally substantiated official indictements actually being treated as criminal acts by US Courts…..!! , with this kind of indictment the machinery of US law can turn the sanctions into much more than what they are now , they can go beyond the purely personal penalization of those indicted and begin to move into the realm of state sanctions which represents much more directly damaging to the regime………

  16. […] It might surprise you, given Venezuela’s current state, that the country was for many years a model Latin American country. Before 1989, Venezuela had a stable, two-party democracy. Its economy functioned when the price of oil was high, and it was free of much of the violence that plagued other Latin American nations. That changed in 1989 with an event known as El Caracazo. […]

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