All I need is a miracle…

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The “kicker” — the final line in an article — is one of those formal elements journalists endlessly obsess about despite the fact that the reading public seldom seems to notice. Kicker of the year, this time, goes to Phil Gunson, for this at the end of his ICG report:

The crisis will continue, not only for ordinary Venezuelans but for the government itself, which – despite its apparent strength – faces an acute shortage of cash, a hostile public and internal rifts that may well deepen once the immediate threat passes. Just in terms of debt repayments, Venezuela is obliged to disburse more in the next year or so than it currently has in its foreign reserves. If the power struggle within the regime is won by hardliners determined to close down any avenues to a political transition or to institutional spaces for its critics, then it is highly likely that a similar dispute within the opposition would also be won by the most hawkish elements.

If it fails, the Vatican’s intervention to restart dialogue will be remembered as yet another lost opportunity to halt the downward slide to greater conflict. However, such is the moral authority of the Pope, especially in a Catholic country like Venezuela, that to walk away from Vatican mediation could prove too costly for both sides and an agreement may eventually be reached. In that case, the moderates will emerge empowered, and the mediation could lay the basis for a negotiated transition.

For many Venezuelans, the odds of that happening are in the hands of a higher power, and for that, Pope Francis has the best connections. Asked if there was any hidden factor that made the Vatican more optimistic than many ordinary mortals, a Church source pulled a face. “Anything hidden?” he said. “We believe in miracles”.

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18 COMMENTS

    • Don’t forget, the Cubs winning the Series qualifies as a miracle.

      My hope is that Vatican involvement will lower the chance of violence by the government.

  1. Well, chavismo is doing their damn hardest to make the dialogue fail:

    http://runrun.es/runrunes-de-bocaranda/runrunes/286256/los-runrunes-de-bocaranda-de-hoy-10-11-2016-bajo-odio-contra-la-iglesia.html

    3 tons of medicines and medical supplies are rotting in La Guaira’s port, because according to the chavistas, “there’s no need for those here, we are perfectly fine.”

    I wholly suscribe Bocaranda’s words here to describe the chavistas in the customs (Minions of maduro and capodado): Hypocrites and cretins.

  2. “moral authority in a catholic country”. Good joke.
    Also when he writes that the Pope has connections with higher powers, does he mean Fidel?
    I hope nobody pays good money for such an “deep and insightful report”.

    • That’s right. Papa Francisco loves Cuba, to visit and embrace both Castro assassins and perpetual dictators. He might even befriend Maduro and the Chavista gang, and any other murderous thief like Cabello.

      After all, Venezuela and the Vatican do have one thing in common: they use Religion for profit, and are among THE most Corrupt countries in the world. Heck, per capita, the Vatican is probably even more corrupt than Venezuela or Haiti or Nigeria. Yep, the Pope does have many connection$ with Higher Power$$$. Not himself – he’s poor – but his entire Church is a mess.

      He should try and clean the Vatican’s den of thieves first. Then travel the world. Good luck with that.. Them priests nowadays love the good life..

  3. “Just in terms of debt repayments, Venezuela is obliged to disburse more in the next year or so than it currently has in its foreign reserves.”

    Has the regime ever been in this dire of straits?

    “However, such is the moral authority of the Pope, especially in a Catholic country like Venezuela, that to walk away from Vatican mediation could prove too costly for both sides and an agreement may eventually be reached. ”

    I think this vastly overstates the esteem/power the Pope has (regardless of who is the actual Pope) in Venezuela, times have changed. The position of the Pope may still be such that it is hard for the two sides to dismiss Vatican mediation attempts without at least pretending to give it a try, but walking away from it is not that costly. What are Chavismo’s afraid of, domestic public opinion? People hate them. Are they worried about the optics to the world? They are already pariahs.

    • “What are Chavismo’s afraid of, domestic public opinion? People hate them”

      Actually, the chavistas hate specifically maduro and capodado, but they still love the whole system where the “big strong government completely fucks up anybody you hate”, they simply don’t want to be in the wrong side of chavista system, they want to go back to the “good times” where everything was “free” for them, and where their favorite dictator screwed the life of anybody they hated.

      They still need to keep the charade that chavismo has always been “peaceful and loving descendants of Bolívar” while every non-chavista is a “ravenous, hysterical, drug addict, nazi, fag, homicidal, traitorous, baby-molesting and eating monster”, they even go as far as justifying every single murder committed by their death squads claiming that “the escuacas deserved it, they ran face-first into the bullets, it’s their own fault.”

      If that fallacy of superiority ever falls, chavismo will wither and die instantly, that’s the reason of their cynicysm, their brazen invisibilization of everybody that doesn’t kneel to them, they don’t even think that “if you’re not chavista you’re not venezuelan” like Chávez himself said, they think that “if you’re not chavista you’re even worse than shit”

      Chavistas in general are terrified to face the consequences of their actions, because in the best of cases, they’ll get mocked and teased as laughingstocks for the rest of their lives, or in the worst cases, they’ll end in a ditch face-down.

  4. The definition of the “Chavista Miracle” was just uttered on Ven. natl. TV (cadena) by a grateful recipient from NM of a new clapboard apartment in a Mision Vivienda complex in Trujillo, “Imagine, here I am, I don’t even have a job, and I have a brand new apartment.” Just another example of an economically-failed socialist state….

  5. Well at least the Vatican speaks frankly about its leverage in the face of worldly evil: nada.

    Another approach might be for the Vatican to name and identify the evil, and use its considerable resources to organize people and mobilize resistance to it.

    • Well at least the Vatican speaks frankly about its leverage in the face of worldly evil: nada.

      Seems to me that Chavistas have also been hoping for a miracle- a rise in the price of oil. Big rise. Hang in there until the price of oil rises. Didn’t Maduro tell us “God will provide?”
      When the mediator and one of the two sides are hoping for a miracle, there isn’t much hope for a miracle.

      The basic problem is that successful mediations involve compromise, and Chavismo has never been big on compromise. Miracle, indeed.

      A Little Bit is Better Than Nada. 🙂

  6. I think the article is overestimating the power and influence of the Catholic church in Venezuela, we are not Colombia, and vast sways of working class people are becoming evangelical christians or santeros (Chávez was rumored to be evangelic)

  7. Asked if there was any hidden factor that made the Vatican more optimistic than many ordinary mortals, a Church source pulled a face. “Anything hidden?” he said. “We believe in miracles”.

    ——- such bitter wretchedness

  8. Gracias por el enlace, no conocía esa web… (y no subestime a los lectores de prensa, todos en general tendemos a prestar más atención al comienzo y el final de cualquier texto y aunque normalmente no vemos la “endlessly obsession ” por el “kicker” del periodista que escribió el artículo apreciamos igualmente todos los buenos finales)

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