Prosecutor general Luisa Ortega Díaz issued a statement before allegedly travelling to Brazil, according to Colombian Migration officials.

The prosecutor explained that she will attend the Meeting of Mercosur Prosecutors set for today, an event that will allow her to expose evidence incriminating Nicolás and his cronies in serious corruption cases and to ratify her condemnation of the breakdown of constitutional order in Venezuela. She restated her commitment toward “the restitution of liberties abolished by the dictatorship.”

Her statement came long before Nicolás threatened to request an Interpol red code against her and her husband, lawmaker Germán Ferrer; claiming that the U.S. managed to blackmail the prosecutor general over corruption evidence collected against her husband. This man’s misogyny is proverbial.

Another boring monologue

With too much make up and dressed in the liquiliqui he insists on turning into his symbol, Nicolás started his monologue claiming that he has no weapons of mass destruction (other than chavismo itself), accusing BBC of being a voracious agency of anti-Venezuelan propaganda and talking about our crisis as if it were a mere sidenote.

The video of an American union leader was enough reason for Nicolás to drone on for an hour about PSUV’s alleged achievements. Proving that he’s a dictator, he commanded his ministers to give him the figures to prove that his government builds more houses that the U.S. government: since the figure he heard contradicted his claim, he demanded another, resulting in an uncomfortable moment that wasn’t resolved until someone gave him the figure he wanted.

He said that international pressure was “blackmail;” he praised former Colombian president Álvaro Uribe Vélez just to spite Juan Manuel Santos, and once again told Trump that he wants to talk with him, despite claiming that he’s prepared a set of decisions and measures (which he didn’t explain) to defend his regime from the commercial, financial and oil blockade that Trump will allegedly decree against him.

Social media control

Perhaps Nicolás wanted to insult presidents Santos, Cartes, Temer and Macri, among others, when he claimed to have 200,000 viewers on Facebook, even though he never even managed 700.

Shortly after, Delcy Rodríguez said at a meeting of the Asamblea Nacional Constituyente (ANC) that in order to achieve peaceful cohabitation, the “Law against crimes of hate, tolerance and violence” must regulate the use of social networks with severe sanctions, because social media has allegedly become “the most grotesque and brutal platform to undermine integrity.”

Evidently, the Constituyentes don’t watch VTV, the most efficient channel for the constant spread of hate, intolerance and violence. Their cynicism runs so deep, that Diosdado Cabello had the nerve to speak about the line that defines the script for his TV show:

Sin odio, el mazo no da.

The threats are news now, in any case.

International Commission of Jurists

This committee denounced that Venezuela’s profound institutional crisis prevents the possibility of those responsible for massive human rights violations from ever being served justice, due to the rupture of the Rule of Law and the Judiciary’s lack of independence.

The report also mentions the increase of “extrajudicial executions, torture and cruel treatment, illegal detentions, civilians tried by military tribunals and the persecution of any social or political dissidence.”

The ICJ expressed its concern for the truth committee’s creation, for its potential to be “an instrument of political manipulation meant to reinforce the executive’s impunity (…) and silence the opposition.”

Political prisoners

While NGO Foro Penal submitted the updated list of Venezuela’s political prisoners to OAS chief Luis Almagro, reporting that there are now 645 of them, lawmaker Wilmer Azuaje was indicted for the crimes of illegal possession of weapons of war, illegal trafficking of ammunitions, inappropriate use of military uniforms, criminal association and resisting authority, and will remain in prison, this time in the Centro de Procesados 26 de julio, in San Juan de los Morros, Guárico.

That’s why it’s good news that the Chilean government decided to grant diplomatic asylum to four justices and a dissident political leader who were sheltered at their embassy in Caracas.

Less and less

Oil exports fell by 24% in the first half of August, heightening concerns that Venezuela may not be able to fulfill coming payments for is $3,5 billion debt, according to Bloomberg. Venezuela exported 1.27 million daily barrels between August 1st and 15th, compared to the 1.68 million exported back in 2016 in the same period. Oil output dropped to its lowest in 14 years in July and there are indications that it could drop even more.

Abroad

The Vatican’s State Secretary, Pietro Parolin, said after a meeting with Russian Foreign minister Sergei Lavrov, that his country could contribute to dialogue in Venezuela due to its close links with Nicolás.

The UN’s Under-Secretary General for Political Affairs, Jeffrey Feltman, spoke to AN Speaker Julio Borges about his concern for the crisis and ratified his support for institutionality, pointing out that the UN can be space for discussion in favor of democracy if the government and the opposition want it. U.S. vice-president Mike Pence will travel today to Doral to meet with Venezuelan exiles.

Yesterday, former Mexican president Vicente Fox once again criticized the government and said that Nicolás must resign “or he’s leaving feet first, in a coffin.” He reiterated his call for the international community to create a common front to save Venezuela.

Carmen Dávila, Colombia’s vice-minister of Social Protection, said that any Venezuelan who enter her country will have guaranteed attention at least during the urgent phase.

Lastly, president Juan Carlos Varela announced that Venezuelans travelling to Panama will require a visa starting October 1st, 2017.

Isabel Allende talked about Venezuela in the presentation of her book Más allá del invierno, saying that ours is a massive crisis. She expressed her wishes for a peaceful solution that involves every country in the region in defense of democracy, and stated that Venezuela once sheltered Chilean citizens during Pinochet’s dictatorship, and now Chile is returning the favor. Allende was clearer than Bachelet.

Yesterday was indeed a day of great ironies, none so serious as the law against hate, that could be used against any dissident.

Chancellor Jorge Arreaza responded to the Panamanian visa announcement with reciprocity and announced “complementary measures.”

#Plop

13 COMMENTS

  1. “Proving that he’s a dictator, he commanded his ministers to give him the figures to prove that his government builds more houses that the U.S. government: since the figure he heard contradicted his claim, he demanded another, resulting in an uncomfortable moment that wasn’t resolved until someone gave him the figure he wanted”

    Anyone have that video? Buffoons

    • Most people in the US would be perfectly happy if they were told that their government built exactly 0 (zero) houses. The US government is not in the real estate business. That activity is best left into the very able hands of private individuals.

      • That is exactly right. And masburro is not the only one ignorant of that fact. Venezuelan liberals seem to be under the same impression….

      • In the 1940s thru the 1960s many local communities in an effort to address housing needs for the poor developed housing authorities that build public housing compounds. These tended to develop into high crime, gang, and drug infested areas. A example would be Cabrini -Green in Chicago built by the Chicago Housing Authority. They never lived up to the goal or worked to help the poor. The concept has been show to be non-workable and has fallen out of vogue. In 2011, Cabrini-Green was demolished.

        • Also at the time, Chicago was the most segregated city in the country. Things do not seem to have changed much but the city supported mixed use and multi-family/single family developments by private investment.

    • I have not seen any detailed figures for housing construction for the years 2013-2016, but I have seen Chavista claims that 1,500,000 housing units were built under the 18 years of Chavista rule. In 2013, CC had an article on housing construction: Gran Mision Mad Rush to Catch Up After Years of Broken Promises. From a link the article provides, we find out that from 1999-2012 there were 748,734 housing units built, which is an average of 53,481 housing units built per year. That data appears to me to be accurate- especially since it agrees with other sources I have seen for some previous years.

      For there to have been 1,500,000 housing units built from 1999-2016 under Chavista rule, arithmetic shows that there would have been about 750,000 housing units built from 2013-2016- an average of ~187,000 units per year. As two of those years -2015 and 2016- had low oil prices- and from 1999-2012 there were 53,481 units built per year, the 750,000 claim for 2013-2016 doesn’t sound very plausible. Which means the 1,500,000 claim from 1999-2016 doesn’t sound very plausible. Also recall that in 2015 Maduro stated that because the oppo won the Assembly elections, the government wouldn’t be building more housing units in 2016.

      Before Chavismo, most housing construction in Venezuela came from private enterprise, not from the government.

  2. The real story here is the evidence of corruption that LOD says she has. CC needs to get a hold of this and publish it widely! I am sure that Maibort is working this hard.

  3. Isabel Allende talked about Venezuela in the presentation of her book Más allá del invierno, saying that ours is a massive crisis. She expressed her wishes for a peaceful solution that involves every country in the region in defense of democracy, and stated that Venezuela once sheltered Chilean citizens during Pinochet’s dictatorship, and now Chile is returning the favor. Allende was clearer than Bachelet.
    Isabel Allende spent several years of her exile in Venezuela, which will mean she is more sympathetic towards Venezuela. Regarding Bachelet and leftist tyrants, consider Chilean author Roberto Ampuero’s Open Letter to President Bachelet. ( my translation)

    Your Excellency:
    In the public letter that I addressed to you… before you began your journey to Havana, I warned you that when a democrat embraces a tyrant, the democrat always ends up with the stained poncho. It is unfortunate for the image of our country that you, the nation’s top representative, in Cuba have effectively ended up with stained clothing and suffered an affront on the part of Fidel Castro that will happen to head the section “presidential hot flashes” in the book of Guinness’s World Records .
    The way that the .. “maximum leader of the revolution” interjected the theme of the outlet to the sea for Bolivia, frustrates and embarrasses me, but I am not surprised. I say this because I knew the system and the way Fidel Castro handled the island. I lived there and I knew real socialism from the perspectives of the nomenklatura and also as a young man with neither a roof under my head nor a ration book. Your visit suggests to me that you never understood what real socialism was- at least not the Cuban kind. If you did, you should have known two essential things before landing on the island: One, that the Cuban regime hates Chile for its history and because it is a hopeful model for the world for both its recovery of democracy and its economic achievements . Another, that Fidel Castro only respects those who do not bow to his dictates, who dare to oppose him, that the rest do not count for him because they are only his fellow travelers or despicable subordinates. It is the logic of every dictator.
    That’s why I felt embarrassed this Thursday when I saw you become emotional- rushing even trotting- forgetting the homage to Salvador Allende and the Chilean colony there, because Fidel Castro – who in those months should not have much agenda, let’s say – had ordered that you appear at one of his residences. I never imagined that I was going to see a Chilean leader running in a frenzy and agitated to see a dictator. I confess that I would have waited, out of respect for the position you hold, a statesman attitude, more decorous, perhaps paused and in accordance with his investiture. It was not even that you were late, because the meeting was arranged for the next day. And it was as you left the ceremony as if there had been a tragedy in Chile or had detected a bomb on the site, without even explaining to the compatriots why you were hurrying out. It is also astonishing that you have climbed into the caravan of the host president, breaking away from his own safety, and remained for an hour and a half, ingenuously and awash with admiration, in a secret place with the man who then stabbed you in the back with the statement on Bolivia…..

    And on Thursday night, Madame President, when you were still unaware of the surprise that Fidel Castro was preparing for you, you were photographed at the Havana Book Fair with Raúl Castro -who holds my novel “Our Olive Green Years ” in his hands. This was possible because a Chilean exhibitor dared to carry copies of that book-that is censured in Cuba. In another Castro maneuver, the Chilean President contributes to the creation of the image that my novel – as well as that of hundreds of Cuban authors and of the world culture censored today in that island – can circulate freely in Cuba. You, who knew East Germany and other communist countries, know well that books critical to the regime do not freely circulate there.

    It is incredible, Madam President, that Fidel Castro has thrown in your face an alleged injustice that occurred 150 [sic] years ago and you were not capable of throwing right back at him an injustice that is happening before your very eyes. (human rights in Cuba)

    Ampuero wrote this on the occasion of President Bachelet’s visit to Cuba in 2009. Ampuero was a member of Communist Youth who initially fled Chile for East Germany after the coup, He spent about 5 years in Cuba, after falling in love in East Germany with the daughter of the Cuban nomenklatura. Ampuero has some definite opinions about Cuba.
    Unfortunately, only one of his books has been translated into English. But well worth the read for Spanish speakers.

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