In their latest report, Cáritas Venezuela confirmed that the amount of children with some degree of malnutrition – in the poorest parishes of the states covered by the study – climbed from 54% to 68% between April and August; the trend tripled in four months. A larger number of malnutrition cases in all three forms, acute, moderate and severe, was registered. Those figures surpass the severity threshold that defines a crisis and push us closer to a food emergency. In the homes covered by the study, respondents admitted they’ve reduced their meal intake, as well as the quantity and quality of the products they consume. Deficiencies in food diversity went from 66% to 85% between February and August 2017.

The head of the Venezuelan Observatory of Health (OVS), Dr. Marianella Herrera, said on Thursday that 50% of malnutrition in children starts before the age of five, explaining that the Venezuelan dietary pattern has changed drastically. Specialists believe that if urgent action is not taken, “the damage will be severe” and there will be “many more deaths.” 

Shortage of medicines

The head of the Pharmaceutical Federation of Venezuela, Freddy Ceballos, said that the ten million doses of medicines that arrived in the country won’t be enough to cover all of our needs. To illustrate the shortage of medicines, Ceballos, explained the drop in the index of annual doses: in a year, it fell from 740 million units to 264 million. There’s an 85% shortage of medicines and no antibiotics for children came in this shipment.

Francisco Valencia, head of Codevida, remarked that the crisis is caused by both the lack of foreign currency to import medicines and the fact that Venezuela isn’t producing any of them.

The manager of Transfusional Medicine of the Venezuelan Society of Hematology, Fernando Guevara, said yesterday that the Health Ministry won’t send reagents to the country’s blood banks for the rest of the year and pointed out that from now on, each hospital will have to purchase its own products, even if they don’t have the funds to take on that expense.

Sanctions without banknotes

Interior minister Néstor Reverol announced that the government raised the interbank ATM cash withdrawals limit to Bs. 5,000, enough to pay for a hot dog. He also announced future measures to fight the crisis: raising the limits for purchases at retail POS systems, online transfers and ATM cash withdrawals – absurd! –, as well as slashing the VAT by 3% for transactions of up to Bs. 2 million and by 5% for operations beyond that amount.

He gave an extended report of inspected and sanctioned businesses, blocked POS, confiscated cash and arrests due to “irregular practices.” That is: he offered all the arguments necessary to support the absurd notion that cash issues aren’t caused by inflation or cash shortages to satisfy the demand of the bolívar’s new “value”, but by the wicked people who carry it out of the country to play Monopoly.

Less oil

“Venezuelav vortex” is the title of the chapter dedicated to our country in the International Energy Agency’s report for August, in which they explain that oil output dropped by 20% in merely two years due to operational issues. They also report that sales to the U.S. and India dropped by 90,000 barrels per day this year. “Output has decreased to about 2 million barrels per day, close to the minimum in three decades, and reductions may even accelerate because it is increasingly difficult to urgently import the solvent required to process extra heavy crude (…), pay for goods and services required for daily operations and reimburse international oil companies,” says the report, adding that exports dropped to 1.7 million barrels per day.

But relax, BCV will reactivate Dicom auctions with their selection of currencies, who knows when.

Subservient to PSUV

Diosdado Cabello cautioned public employees that they must vote for chavista candidates in regional elections and that the carnet de la patria is precisely intended for that: “We know everything,” was his threat.

That’s why it’s not strange that the board of Táchira’s Bar Association denounced the dismissal of 20 Prosecutor’s Office prosecutors as political retaliation. Senior prosecutor Euclides Quevedo notified them that they were fired, without specifying the reason for their removal. They also denounced that six courts of control have no judges, explaining that the same situation has been reported in Carabobo, Lara and Sucre.

Abroad

“The Venezuelan conflict can only be resolved peacefully and a military intervention from any of the parties can cause a chaos and a slaughter that country doesn’t need,” said Costa Rican president Luis Guillermo Solís.

Paraguayan president Horacio Cartes said that he talked to Nicolás to offer him food and medicines but he refused help: “all we need is Venezuela to accept the help,” he said. After his meeting with UN chief Antonio Guterres, he said that he offered to be an instrument for good and that he doesn’t want to do “political marketing with the pain of so many people.”

Lastly, Russian Foreign minister Sergei Lavrov said before the UN General Assembly that “It’s unacceptable to incite riots and threaten to use force to democratize Venezuela or undermine legitimate authorities in any country,” saying that the unilateral sanctions imposed by the U.S. are wrong.

Briefs

  • It wasn’t an iguana: CANTV reported that hurricane María’s passing caused issues with the country’s internet service.
  • Payments: Venezuela said yesterday that the funds for a pending payment of the Global 2027 bond had been transferred, but bondholders told Reuters that they haven’t been paid yet.
  • Before default: Brazilian officials from the Central Bank and the Ministry of Finance are planning to visit Venezuela to prevent the nation from failing to pay contracts for up to $5 billion.
  • Sanctions: the U.S. ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, said yesterday: “There’s a lot of support in Latin America to see Venezuela start to respect its people and go back to the democracy it’s supposed to be (…) If things don’t improve, all those options are always there,” saying that the an oil embargo remained a possibility.

27 COMMENTS

  1. Okay, educate me:

    For decades, I’ve been hearing about the miraculous wonders of Cuba’s pharmaceutical industry. It’s one of their five main talking points.

    So why is VZ suffering such a drastic pharmaceuticals shortage?

    • You’re right: it is one of their main “talking” points. Just “talking”… Question: Do you believe everything you hear? It is a truth of communists… Just saying…

    • Because Castrogovia’s claims are just that, claims. They are the ones that present these numbers to the world. And they are much more accomplished liars than even the Chavistas.

    • Cuba sells medical equipment and supplies to Venezuela with, as I understand it, large “markups”. It’s a relationship based on pure self interest, from the Cuban perspective at least. I imagine if the dollars aren’t coming in, the supplies aren’t going out.

      Having said that, I know people who have taken medical supplies to Cuba, which are chronically in states of shortage. Sort of like what Venezuelans now do, except the Cuban authorities apparently have tolerated it.

      • Do tell. Which company in Cuba make autoclaves, MRI machines, and incubators? I know they import parts and do assembly in country, but complex scanners we’re something they we’re just rebranding for quite some time.

        • At least a significant amount – and maybe all- of high tech medical equipment Cuba sells to Venezuela is imported by Cuba itself. They’re the middle man. Don’t get your knickers in a knot.

  2. We keep hearing the rumor that Maduro has officially proclaimed that eggs will now be sold for Bs 3,000 per carton. That’s the equivalent of Bs 100 per egg. We haven’t had eggs here at our bodega for a few weeks, but to give you guys some idea of how ridiculous Bs 3,000 per carton is, the last eggs we sold were for Bs 1200 PER EGG! Amazingly, eggs seem to have disappeared from the market. Can’t figure out why.

    “close to the minimum in three decades, and reductions may even accelerate because it is increasingly difficult to urgently import the solvent required to process extra heavy crude (…), ”

    I’ve been waiting to receive a second set of 20 plastic drums which I’ll use to store processed corn in another month or so but the Morichal Plant (heavy crude) has been basically shut down due to a variety of problems including electrical problems, labor union problems, and shortages of chemicals.

    As Naky says, we go on.

    • This is a big deal, big leagues major deal.

      People have been crossing out fish, red and white meats already from their diets. Caraotas and other grains are out as well, ironically what yaras ago was considered “·poor people food” now eggs which are the major source of what little protein venezuelans eat is going to get the socialist shaft.

      Oh boy, are venezuelans in for a viacrucis.

      al menos nobody is eating perrarina like in the cuarta vale

      • Vero, perrarina is at about 10,000 bs per kilo right now, at least here locally when it can be found. Chicken, when it can be found, sells at about 17,000 Bs to the kilo and the last beef I bought was at 14,000 Bs to the kilo.

        Of course, no one can produce eggs at Bs 100 each. Every thing that comes out of the man’s mouth is lunacy, but then, I guess that surprises no one here.

        Once the full force of price controls are instituted (and they’re threatening price to controls to “protect” the population), we’re going to be in even deeper shit than we are now, if that’s possible.

        Classes are cranking up again. It’ll be interesting to see how much weight the local kids have lost since I last saw them in mid June. One benefit I guess is that some won’t need new uniforms as last’s year’s will still fit just fine.

        The crimes against humanity continue.

        • Price controls are always an excuse to give more control to the military, more extortion power to the bureaucrats and to pump up the prices of the bachaquero network associated with both military and bureaucrats.

          It always goes one more step towards the extreme, they don´t care if they steal from a sick or starving person, or children or elderly, the level of mafia and clientelism is astonishing.

          They are a few steps shorter from regulating the air and making everyone choke to death

        • MRubio

          So, without having chickens, how do people where you live get eggs? Are they not available at any rate? I couldn’t imagine eggs disappearing from the market, how low can things go? my goodness

          Thanks for sharing.

          • Rory, chickens mass produced for human consumption are basically a totally different animal than laying hens which produce eggs on a mass production basis.

            Back when one could find quality baby chicks, and quality feed, and the proper medicines, one could have chickens ready for slaughter, that’s to say, chick to adult, in 35-36 days, sometimes a day or two less sometimes a bit more, especially for the females. The animals are typically butchered to yield a carcas of 2 to 2.5 kilos.

            Several years ago, and over a period of a couple of years, we produced and slaughtered something on the order 10,000 birds here at the house, typically in groups of 500. Chick quality, lack of feed and mecdicines, and disease finally caught up with us and we quite the service.

            Laying hens take as much as 6 months before they bear their first eggs and productive life varies, but is really not all that long relatively speaking.

            A few people still produce chickens and eggs in their back yards, but that’s mostly for personal consumption and most of those folks here in this pueblo have slaughtered their birds for lack of feed and raw corn over the last year.

            It’s tough now, and getting tougher by the day. I see no end in sight.

  3. Venezuela said yesterday that the funds for a pending payment of the Global 2027 bond had been transferred, but bondholders told Reuters that they haven’t been paid yet.”

    How much you wanna bet that they don’t get paid, as the funds haven’t (won’t be) transferred? I’ll wager dollars to donuts that the wheels have officially come off the “We ALWAYS have repaid our debts” Chavista wagon. A month earlier than I predicted.

    Rats.
    Sinking.
    Ships.

    In 3… 2… 1…

  4. So Maduro pays the bondholders at the expense of feeding the children. To me that means he thinks he has the popular revolt possibity well under control. Venezuelans are either apathetic or frightened.

      • You know what’s tragic?

        With VZ taking center stage on the world stage now, NOW’S the time to ramp up the protests and get things fucking moving. I just don’t GET it!

        Get everyone out in the streets, provoke the administration to carry out the repressive measures they carry out best…

        AND GIVE THE FUCKING U.S. SOME VALIDITY TO TAKE MILITARY ACTION, on whatever level.

        VZ’s pussy neighbors aren’t going to do a damn thing, and it seems either will Venezuelans.

        It’s been said before and it’s worth saying again:

        It’s a lost cause, and it’s all over.

        Except there’s one guy who won’t accept that, and this site…and every Ameriphobic Hispanic on earth…has the ignorance and balls to criticize him.

        Trump.

  5. […] Just like Naky reported, “Cáritas Venezuela confirmed that the amount of children with some degree of malnutrition – in the poorest parishes of the states covered by the study –, climbed from 54% to 68% between April and August; the trend tripled in four months. A larger number of malnutrition cases in all three forms, acute, moderate and severe, was registered. Those figures surpass the severity threshold that defines a crisis and push us closer to a food emergency.” […]

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