This weekend, a series of photographs showing women in labor inside the waiting room of Barquisimeto’s Pastor Oropeza Hospital, run by the government, under the banner of the Venezuelan Social Security Institute or IVSS, went viral at home and abroad.

The government’s response was immediate, focusing on what really matters: PR.

Information Minister Ernesto Villegas published a quick response on Twitter, and Health Vice-Minister Linda Amaro blamed the Lara State Government, regarding the state of Barquisimeto’s Central Hospital state Governor Henri Falcón told Amaro to take care of the Pastor Oropeza instead.

But the effect on public opinion was so overwhelming that the hegemony couldn’t beat it. Therefore, they sent the Venezuelan Intelligence Service (SEBIN) and the Criminal Investigations Police (CICPC) to find out who was responsible for taking the pictures.

According to El Estímulo’s Vanessa Arenas, sixteen people working in the hospital were interrogated. Miriam Valiño and María Brizuela, medical students from the local public university (UCLA), spent several hours detained by the SEBIN. They considered their detention as a retaliation against UCLA and the university suspended all their internships in the Pastor Oropeza.

The government eventually found out who took the photos administrative hospital worker Lenny Martínez González. She’s now under SEBIN’s custody and local NGO Funpaz made public what appears to be her mugshot. Martínez shared the pictures with a former hospital doctor now in Chile, but her main purpose was to denounce the situation to her boss.

Funpaz’s Andrés Colmenares told Efecto Cocuyo the reasoning behind this intimidation:

“(The government) doesn’t care about the integrity of the women portrayed or the health of the babies born. What it wants to avoid is the hospital’s precariousness going public.”

As the government prefers to show outrage about foreign crisis in Catalonia, and present themselves as moral paladins in the Calma Pueblo incident, cases like this one truly show the public what hides beneath the image they want to present of themselves.

And they’ll do anything so you don’t peek under their mask.

15 COMMENTS

  1. They are terrified of a ‘candelita que se prenda’. Proportional to its intolerance is its precariousness.

    Next two challenges for the dictatorship:

    1)-How to muddle with the upcoming election so that they can claim a fake victory.

    2)-Paying upcoming Venezuelan bonds.

    • “candelita que se prenda, la vamos a apagar a coñazos y a tiros” said pedro carajalino, one of the infamous chavista lapdogs who takes great pride in being a general asshole.

      Also, he got a slapping for being such an asshole:

  2. Muddle the upcoming election?
    Head to the airport…..check out how many new citizens are cvoming in …Turkey…china…..at least 4 planes full today in Maiquetia…..all foreign…familys…..instant voters….you must wonder how many will land before the 18th…..
    Read cobello…. they win 15 governor’s…its over..
    But we knew already

  3. And then you have the future governor of Miranda campaigning promising the following: “Héctor Rodríguez: Alumbraremos las calles y pondremos salas de cine.”

    Something is seriously wrong with the Venezuelan psyche….

    • Because for the tierrúo chavista they don’t give a rat’s ass if there are girls dying at a hospital waiting room.

      chavistas are extremely selfish, miserable and egocentric, and the “I’m giving you free stuff” campaign is the only thing they care for.

  4. But 99,999% of Venezuelans do fuck all as usual. Polar lite is still served cold on every street corner so all is well. This government, sorry, dictarorship can sink this country even further down the shithole because the people, sorry, sheep will never fight for a better way of life. Viva Cubazuela!

  5. You missed the big story:

    Maduro visiting Belarus to discuss military ties.

    The milk came out of my nostrils laughing at that one.

  6. This is also an obvious result of a flood of pregnancies caused by a complete lack of birth control pills and condoms.
    Even if you can find them they are too expensive for the vast majority of the pueblo.
    Given a choice between beer or rum and birth control we all know what the choice would be.
    The result is super overcrowding in the maternity wards.

Leave a Reply to Juan Largo Cancel reply