Original art by @modográfico

Write this one down: in the coming months, oil and gas production in PDVSA Gas Anaco will abruptly drop. Why? Because nobody wants to run a drilling rig when hungry.

The industry is still reeling from the military takeover of PDVSA. The purchasing power of wages has collapsed. Here, in Anaco, the large PDVSA Gas facility has been been hit hard by it all.  

And so, a large number of employees have grabbed their suitcases and left the country.

César Castro is a gas technician. He’s been working for PDVSA Gas Anaco since 2006. Frustrated by the terrible wages, he decided to go to Peru, where he’s now working in a fast-food restaurant.

It’s not fair that the company’s income is in dollars and we’re paid in bolivars that constantly depreciate.

César says that during his 7 x 7 watches  (seven consecutive work days and then seven free days) he had to jump through all sorts of hoops to eat well: borrow money, sell appliances, wire and parts. He didn’t formally resign: “One day I decided not to keep wasting my time there. I gathered the money I could and set off for Lima. If I had stayed on at the drilling rig, I’d have starved to death. Many of us are left waiting for a severance pay packet that’s not enough to live on.”

Clause 20 of the Oil-Sector Collective Bargaining Agreement for 2015-2017 guarantees food will be supplied to workers working on drilling, production, wallcover and flyway. Another broken promise.

PDVSA hires companies meant to cater food to employees. Most of the time, the food is already spoiled when it arrives. Other times, portions are far too small. Everyone we interviewed for this piece, some of them only accepted if they could remain anonymous, said that sometimes they bring their food to work, some days there’s nothing to eat there and they bring that lunchbox back home to share with their families.

Employees feel trapped. Without alternative ways to produce income, forced by the circumstances to work for Bs.200,000 a week.

Crime wave

In addition to the poor workplace conditions, the staff on the night shift at the drills is vulnerable to constant robberies.According to employees (who, again, asked to remain anonymous) management won’t adequately protect the facilities. There have even been robberies where State personnel has been involved.

In several opportunities, they’ve expressed their dissatisfaction by shutting down the scarcely operational drill for 8 hours, but they’re immediately threatened with prison. The employees demand Will Rangel, head of the Unitary Federation of Venezuelan Oil Workers (FUTPV) and ANC member, to set more favorable clauses in the next Oil Collective Bargaining Agreement (expired on October 1, 2017) with real benefits. There hasn’t been a word about the contract.

“It’s not fair that the company’s income is in dollars and we’re paid in bolivars that constantly depreciate,” said Carlos Uzcátegui, a worker on the PDV 51 drill, in the Anaco-San Mateo road. “Foreign contractors such as CNPC pay bonuses in dollars to their employees.”

In view of the absence of solutions, oil workers protested in Anaco during the first week of January, covered up by the tight filter of PDVSA information. There’s only one active news outlet in Anaco, La Noticia de Oriente, and it doesn’t cover the tension and conflict within the oil company.

Plummeting production

The situation is getting worse and it could become a massive exodus of qualified personnel in the Venezuelan Oil Industry in the coming months. Currently, the drills PDV 21, PDV 145, PDV 146, PDV 03, PDV 116 and PDV 64 are inactive, according to employees, due to lack of equipment and of raw materials.

It’s important to ponder about the future of what used to be one of the main oil producing companies in the world, looted in the last years of socialist administration, but with much to give to the country still.

There are 26 billion cubic feet in total gas reserves in Venezuela’s Eastern area alone. Less than 50% of that wealth is developed.

However, corruption reached its climax and now it’s employees themselves who face the apocalyptic consequences. Not so long ago, working in PDVSA meant prestige; now employees have to be creative to bring food to their homes.

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52 COMMENTS

  1. Good. The worse Klepto-Cubazuela gets, the angrier the people, the hungrier the corrupt military, the better.
    Keep Rex Tillerson posted for the final blow after the election mega-fraud.

    • Probably about 30% of the population will still vote for Maduro today. (The rest will be fraudulent, for a 60% “win”). Many are scared to lose their Clap food from Brazil, or their bogus jobs and various freebies, others,millions of them, are just corrupt Enchufados, leeches of the Kleptocracy. Many Millions of Kleptozuelans are complicit, corrupt and do deserve what they get.

    • I could guess but I would be low balling it.

      They all signed up for a juicy union contract and are now feeling the bite.

      What happens when there is not enough people to get enough oil to keep legal income moving?

      Full on narco statehood.

  2. “Oil World Turns Upside Down as U.S. Sells Oil in Middle East

    The United Arab Emirates, a model Persian Gulf petro-state where endless billions from crude exports feed a giant sovereign wealth fund, isn’t the most obvious customer for Texan oil.

    Yet, in a trade that illustrates how the rise of the American shale industry is upending energy markets across the globe, the U.A.E. bought oil directly from the U.S. in December, according to data from the federal government. A tanker sailed from Houston and arrived in the Persian Gulf last month.

    The cargo of American condensate, a type of very light crude oil, was preferred to regional grades because its superior quality made more suitable for the U.A.E’s processing plants, a person with knowledge of the matter said, asking not to be identified discussing a commercially sensitive matter.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-06/u-s-oil-heads-to-middle-east-in-latest-sign-of-shale-s-spread

    Tillerson holds all the cards when talking to Venezuela’s neighbors about further isolating the regime.

    • Agreed.

      The balancing act will be to nudge things along without putting a “Made in America” sign on the inevitable downfall of the regime. Meanwhile Venezuelans suffer.

      Quico has the ear of some in Washington and at the Washington Post. Tillerson could use some advice from those close to the action, meaning Quico and the CC staff. That is, if they can get over their anti-Trump funk long enough to help.

      • “Quico has the ear of some in Washington and at the Washington Post.”

        Maybe, but WaPo has an insane case of TDS and by definition have to be opposed to anything the Donald (aka “Orange Julius”) or his administration does.

        Anyway, why bother with any sort of additional intervention if pdvsa is collapsing nicely on its own. Just let it play out, and there will be no oil to sell to the US. No boycott needed.

        • Agreed. The US needs to do nothing, other than to express solidarity with those who seek freedom from Chavismo.

          Chavismo is doing all the hard work for Trump. Maduro is counting on Trump to save Chavismo’s bacon by intervening.

          Dear President Trump:

          DO NOTHING. SAY NOTHING. OFFER HUMANITARIAN AID AFTER CHAVISMO IS GONE.

          Thank you.

          Signed,

          The People of Venezuela

      • “Quico has the ear of some in Washington and at the Washington Post. Tillerson could use some advice from those close to the action, meaning Quico and the CC staff. That is, if they can get over their anti-Trump funk long enough to help.”

        Right, let’s parse that, shall we? So basically Quico will do nothing for Venezuela as long as Donald Trump is president?

        Really? I mean, I get you and Quico disagree about many isms, but seriously?

        No me jodas.

        “Maybe, but WaPo has an insane case of TDS and by definition have to be opposed to anything the Donald (aka “Orange Julius”) or his administration does.”

        Hey, I get you don’t cotton to liberal news outlets. I hear you. But it’s obvious the last time you read a WAPO editorial, written by the board as opposed to an individual author, must have been 6-7 years ago. WAPO, NYT and other news outlets that in the past at beat turned a blind eye to Venezuela have solidly come out against the regime, chavismo and the rest.

        Seriously pana, informate mejor vale.

        • Robert Nasser,

          I admit I can’t stomach those partisan rags (NYT, WaPo) these days, although I have subscribed to both in years past. The constant pants-shitting, bed-wetting pussy-hat-wearing tantrums of derp since they lost the election in Nov 2016 has made them unreadable. The Cheeto trolls them with practically every tweet, and they never fail to do this when he does:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_Lnz64vXB8

          No doubt that Quico cares more for the fate of Venezuela than his need to virtue signal anti-Trump (although bonus points if he can do both). But, so what? That absolute worst possible outcome for Wapo and NYT mouthpieces of the Democratic Party in US is that Trump succeeds at anything, including Venezuela policy. They’re entire strategy seems to be “see, we told you how much of a shitlord Trump is.” When he does something stupid, they pounce with smug superiority. When he does something good, they lose their shit because they cant do that.

          Maybe start a rumor that Venezuela is hosting the Russian bots that caused deplorable white women to vote for Trump. Now THAT would be something that might get their attention.

          • Otro Gringo:

            No question but that one nanosecond after Trump was declared the victor, the liberal media started the anti Trump frothing.

            Just like the more conservative inclined media did for Obama.

            I subscribe to the WAPO as it’s my local paper, but find myself skipping the political stuff in favor of the local news. To balance it out, I read the Washington Times, which is pretty much diametrically opposed to the Post.

            The bot thing? It would certainly make things interesting!

        • EVERYONE is against Chavista. What separates the men from the boys is helping the administration do something about it. Even an occasional, “spot on, keep up the good work,” would be nice.

          Life is a bitch, and there are times you just have to do what is right, even if it means you will not get invited to the next faculty wine and cheese party.

  3. People fought to be hired by Pdvsa , they were considered cushy , well paid jobs , with lots of benefits , now they give people nothing to hope for , if this is happening in Pdvsa its happening all over ……a return to normalcy will be welcome like nothing else ……., clap bags may buy the regime some temporary peace but not anybodys sympathy , specially as most of people dont get them regularly but only every one in a while and what they carry doenst cover all the needs of a family , only some and then only for a short while ……., if people dont steal everyhing in sight , they are inhuman , the instinct is to survive no matter how …….but how much can you steal if no one has anything worth stealing ……..?? , this is putting a fuse on a bomb that may explode at any time ……!!

  4. Any employee that works for PDVSA is a chavista and therefore a 100% entitled to live a miserable life for eternity. May they all die of hunger and or curable diseases asap. Chavez and Fidel are awaiting them in hell for a 1000 year during bbq.

  5. Interesting that in the workers paradise of Nicolas Maduro the penalty for not working is now incarceration. You can’t get fired, and you can’t not work. I think there’s a name for that.

    It is troubling that people want to lay blame for the existence of this regime at the feet of the people who are suffering and trying their best to survive. In this victim blaming they take a very selective view of cause and effect that ignores, for example, what they have been purchasing and putting in their gas tanks all these years that Hugo Chavez and Nicolas Maduro have been ranting and raving about the Revolution.

    If you want to really demonstrate your moral superiority to the drug dealer and the thug, you’d be better to avoid being his best customer.

    • Based on the chart in the following link, US imports of oil from Venezuela peaked in about 1998 and have been in a slow and steady decline since. Here’s the link to the graph, check it out:

      https://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler.ashx?n=PET&s=MTTIMUSVE1&f=M

      And while I agree that not buying any oil from Venezuela would represent a noble symbol of not contributing to chavismo’s sins against the people of Venezuela, in the end, as a fungible product, the government would simply have sold it elsewhere for the same dollars, though likely slightly discounted.

      In light of not buying Venezuela’s oil, what else was there to do? As we’ve discussed here ad nauseam, since Chavez took power, American presidents have generally been loathe to do anything about the problem. An “embargo” right now (as opposed to years earlier) would certainly inflict severe damage on the regime because of its precarious financial position.

      A blockade….aka an act of war…..would quickly result the regime’s collapse though the political and human costs would probably be much higher than the return on the investment.

      My personal opinion, today, is that an embargo by the US would help tremendously though doing nothing and just staying-the-course is still a viable option. The economy is collapsing at an amazing rate. While our small business does not necessarily reflect what’s going on everywhere within the country, we’ve seen at least a 50% drop off in business in the last few weeks. Part of it involves the recent CLAP boxes that arrived, no doubt about it, but there’s still no denying that this economy is on its deathbed. Hyperinflation is here and it’s killing people’s ability to feed their families. This can’t continue much longer in my view. Something’s going to blow.

      Finally, in response to the main theme of your post Canuck, that you “find it troubling to lay blame for the existence of this regime at the feet of the people who are suffering and trying their best to survive”, I have to ask, who the hell created this mess Canuck? And with such a significant portion of the country, namely those who followed constitutional means of trying to oust this regime via the ballot box, now having left the country, today more than ever those who remain bear an even greater share of the responsibility for the shithole in which they find themselves living. It’s really that simple.

      • I think the position that el pueblo and their votes are completely responsible for the mess they are in contradicts your position that elections have long been totally rigged and meaningless. If it would have happened anyway- this mess- if it was all rigged from the beginning, how is el pueblo primarily responsible?

        But in any event, assuming I am right and that while the last two presidential elections were deeply unfair and to some extent probably rigged, but not meaningless, what we have seen in any election cycle under chavismo, and particularly in the last two presidential elections, is an outpouring of expenditures made possible on large measure, and to this day, by the North American consumer.

        So what I’m suggesting is that when we go on our rot in hell cubazuelans tirades, we should not be so selective about who supported that in substantial ways. And maybe, if needlessly dying human beings does not capture our understanding, some idea of the basic hypocrisy of our rot in hell cubazuelans position might.

        And maybe if the hypocrisy of our moralizing and denunciations sinks in, we’ll be inclined to take more constructive positions.

        I’ll defer to the experts as to how easily and quickly transferable on world markets Venezuelan oil is, but to return to my analogy, it’s not defending any principle against drug dealers to say that if you don’t buy it, someone else will.

        • “I think the position that el pueblo and their votes are completely responsible for the mess they are in contradicts your position that elections have long been totally rigged and meaningless. If it would have happened anyway- this mess- if it was all rigged from the beginning, how is el pueblo primarily responsible?”

          No, it doesn’t contradict my position because I’m not on record as saying that elections have long been totally rigged and meaningless. Others here have said that, that they’ve been rigged since the beginning, not me.

          The last “fair” election I believe was in Dec of 2015 when the overwhelming majority of the country voted in favor of a new National Assembly…..just over 2 years ago. This obviously took Maduro et al by surprise and since they’ve done everything possible to guard against a reoccurance.

          Additionally, if you doubt my word, you’ll find my posts here where I stated that once it became obvious that the AN was going to be emasculated, I was confident that with the 2016 recall, Nicolas was history. After the cunt dragged that out into 2017, I figured, well, at least we’ll get rid of Nicolas…..he’ll be forced to name a successor. Then, boom, that entire process was illegally stopped. THAT was the day I gave up all hope on elections and a constitutional means of ousting this regime.

          “But in any event, assuming I am right and that while the last two presidential elections were deeply unfair and to some extent probably rigged, but not meaningless, what we have seen in any election cycle under chavismo, and particularly in the last two presidential elections, is an outpouring of expenditures made possible on large measure, and to this day, by the North American consumer.”

          We get it that you hate the United States, but to blame the US for Venezuela’s shit-holiness is simply outrageous and typical of a leftist who’s always looking to blame others (usually successful others) for the misery leftist policies have delivered to this country.

          “So what I’m suggesting is that when we go on our rot in hell cubazuelans tirades, we should not be so selective about who supported that in substantial ways. And maybe, if needlessly dying human beings does not capture our understanding, some idea of the basic hypocrisy of our rot in hell cubazuelans position might.

          And maybe if the hypocrisy of our moralizing and denunciations sinks in, we’ll be inclined to take more constructive positions.”

          I have never used the word cubazuelans, and actually, hardly ever mention the cubans even though they’ve obviously got a significant role in all of this. And now that I think of it, if you believe that the cubans have done their part to bring misery to this country, then perhaps it’s time for you to condemn Canadians and Canadian policy of the last 50 years or so of your country’s trade with them, providing them with hard currency they can use to create misery outside of their own borders. Where’s your outrage about that? Or do you simply believe that’s not the case?

          • MRubio you were doing well there responding to the substance of my comment and then you went off the rails again about Canadians and leftists. In defense of the let them rot in hell position apparently.

          • Yeah, that was a brain fart on my part.

            When you mentioned drug dealers I was triggered to talk about something everyone knows is closely related to the subject like Americans having not yet addressed the phenomenon of the angry, alienated (usually) white male with a gun that can inflict mass murder in seconds, but I forgot.

            My bad.

          • Great discussion guys.. my applause ????.

            Regardng oil consumption it’s almost like a balloon, squeeze here, it moves there. Supply defines the size of the balloon. An US embargo of Vz crude would just mean US buys elsewhere, Vz sells elsewhere. But both parties pay a price, US a bit more for shipping, Vz receives a bit less for shipping and a quality penalty since receiving refinery is probably not designed to refine heacy crude optimally, nasty byproducts etc. The cost to US is minimal as volumes are so low, US has options… but the $ cost to regime would be huge. In past the political cost to US would have been huge, not so mich now.

    • The “problem” in a democracy is that your vote has consequences.

      This VZ Government has been voted in power for 20 years by the people of VZ.
      This includes presidential, regional, and local elections, over and over and over again.

      This disaster was foreseen by economist and by historians.

      Who Canuck is to BLAME?

      or is it that the majority of VZ people are “non qualified” to make informed decisions?

      Compassion is usually reserved for those of misfortune. Natural Disasters, Military Coups, and spillover wars are some ways that a population can be blameless.

      • There’s voting. And there’s other things that have consequences that keep the regime in power. For example, if you’re looking for spineless followers of the regime’s dictats, why don’t you ask MRubio if he’s paid Nicky his due for the 2017 fiscal year? That tear gas is expensive.

        Or would it be better for the Marines to take care of things instead of provoking a dispute with the Venezuelan tax authorities? Where are the brave and valiant capitalist bodega owners rising up?

        Or am I being unfair, placing it all on him?

        Look. I’m not suggesting Venezuelans who supported Chavez and Maduro are innocent or blameless. I’m just saying, the rhetoric of blame I’m reading in this beautiful comments section obscures some important truths about how the regime has survived and who has materially contributed to its survival.

        • What complete crap. Rhetoric of blame obscuring some important truths about how the regime has survived and who has materially contributed to its survival?

          We’ve talked about this subject for years on end and have examined it from asshole to appetite. Only recently have you started whining about Americans buying Venezuelan oil……and then when I point out it didn’t matter who bought it because they’d have sold it somewhere anyway, you try to muddy the waters comparing it to drug dealers and drug sales. One’s a legal enterprise, one’s not. Chavez had a right to sell Venezuelan oil where he damned well pleased.

          Why don’t you bitch about the HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS of dollars the Chinese have “loaned” to the country when no one else would or the illegal mining in the south destroying and contaminating the environment that chavismo is committing to buy a few more hours of breath for its miserable life?

          The truth is that shortly after Chavez took office investments in this country by US interests began a steady decline and though only a fraction today of what they once were, you’re going to beat that fuckin’ anti-American drum every chance you get.

          • Hey man. Pay your taxes to Nicolas Maduro. Keep calling for the Marines. Then you’ll be financing the weapons that …well…whatever….Render unto Caesar….

        • “Hey man. Pay your taxes to Nicolas Maduro. Keep calling for the Marines. Then you’ll be financing the weapons that …well…whatever….Render unto Caesar….”

          LOL!!!!! That’s your angle now? That’s the hill you want to die on? Mean ole MRubio is living and working in Venezuela so he’s paying taxes to Nicolas and he’s using MRubio’s money to enslave the people? You really don’t have a fucking clue what you talk about when you blabber and pontificate to others about Venezuela, do you?

          When your woman is on her feet 16 hours a day maintaining a business packaging coffee, rice, beans, cheeze, processed corn, platanos, auyama, sugar, pasta, and casabe, medicines and numeous other daily supplies (when she can find them), for sale to the locals so they can feed and maintain their families…..preach to me about how our bodega is helping prop up fuckin’ Nicolas Maduro.

          And when you put your money on the line maintaining tractors, plows, fumigators, seeders, and other assorted equipment so that those who still wish to plant a crop and try to produce something to better their families can do so, then you can talk to me about how I’m helping fuckin’ Nicolas Maduro with my taxes.

          We don’t make any money here Canuck, we keep our noses above water, at best. Or as I’ve told others, yeah, I’ve made a small fortune in Venezuela…..by first starting with a large fortune.

          Despite the fact that we’re on opposite ends of the political spectrum, I’ve always considered you to be a very bright fellow. Now it seems you’re just trolling. That’s unfortunate.

          • Canuck, I take back my previous comment.. you are trolling.. you’re off the rails to say operating a business, selling product to feed people and paying taxes to stay open and out of jail is supporting the regime. Wow dude.. pack up and go down, start a protest.. see how long you survive.

          • I’m suggesting that you guys ratchet down your rhetoric about how Venezuelans are complicit in this situation, are spineless, and therefore they can rot in hell ( or similar terms) from 11 to say, 3, on a 1-10 scale. Because it’s not so easy and it’s complicated and we all have different means and motives for what we give, and don’t give, our captors. Right? (I’m not optimistic you’ll agree)

          • What we give our captors???? Would someone who lives in Venezuela please chime in and explain how taxes work here so Canucklehead can understand? I’d do it but he’d probably not believe me, or he’d merely distort my words to suit his narrative. Suffice it to say Canuck, that we’ve got all the forms and other legal paperwork filled out with the Seniat and the other 444 government entitites who oversee a business in Venezuela, and fortunately, not even one of them has ever visited our premises…..nor do we communicate with them.

            And canuck, I’ve got no problem ratcheting down my “rhetoric” about how Venezuelans are complicit in this situation though it’s kinda hard not to blame the people who put chavismo in power, no?

            In his post above, Gringo 2 explained better than I the reasons why an oil embargo years ago would have had minimal effect on the regime. Without the red herring drug comparison, can you be intellectually honest and admit that CITGO and a few other US-based refineries being tooled up to handle Venezuelan crude is probably about number 9 or 10 on the Top 10 list of reasons why this regime is still in power?

            Okay, I didn’t think so.

          • MRubio, your forefathers, when they were forced to pay taxes to an unelected despot, stopped paying them. They didn’t suggest (to cover up their embarrassment) that they were not paying the King because they never spoke to the King and instead filled out piles of paperwork.

            If the USA being the largest trading partner of Venezuela is number 10 on the list of reasons why Maduro is still in power, I would suggest to you that a 10% stake in a despotism is not a great position to point at some poor guy trying to feed his family as being the person to blame.

          • Canuck, would you just stop with the stupid tax paying angle of trying to shame me. Please. I’m not embarrassed about anything I do here to earn a living or help those around me.

            And for the record, no one that I’ve ever met pays personal income taxes here and businesses don’t even pay taxes except perhaps tangentially via paying “official” invoices which have the equivalent of a VAT. I can’t recall the last time I paid for something and was handed an offical invoice. The entire system is broken, nothing is functioning. It’s amazing they still keep the lights on……and for us that’s only because we’re fortunate enough to be hooked into a PDVSA substation. That’ll go soon enough.

            As for my forefathers, they were Acadians who arrived in South Louisiana with the clothes on their backs after being expelled from Canada. So fuck off.

    • “You can’t get fired, and you can’t not work.I think there’s a name for that”

      Yes, there is: Communism. From each, according to her ability. Wreckers and Kulaks will be liquidated.

  6. The article is too PC. They are leaving and protesting because there is nothing left to steal, the guisos are getting scarce. Same with the other state companies employees that are protesting. Let’s call a spade a spade.

  7. Chavismo has achieved a catastrophe on par only to a war zone. They unleashed hyperinflation, something that many Latin American countries have done in the past. But what sets them apart though is the destruction of their oil industry, the source of most of the Venezuelan revenue.

    One piece of news a couple of weeks ago was the decree that all food distribution was to be done by Godfather Lopez. They already had ‘trusted military’ doing this a couple of years ago and yet they fail. I am thinking that Venezuela may be unleashing a real famine.

    Another thing that I’ve perceived from comments here and by a conversation I had with a trusted friend this weekend is the downright pessimism prevailing in Venezuela. Even in the face of this disaster, the assessment that I keep hearing is that Maduro is going nowhere. El pueblo hates those escualidos more than they hate Maduro (parusing Aporrea one verifies this). Likewise, la guerra economica is a dogma of faith to justify all the misery. I for one, would think that if you believe that myth, then you also conclude that Maduro is a terrible ‘guerra economica’ warrior.

    But, this horse shit seems to be enough for the people to settle in squalor.

    Logic would dictate the opposite, but Chavismo has defied logic every time. I guess they will defy even the materialistic analysis of history by which if you starve the people you will eventually lose power.

    With that said… fuck’m all.

  8. The US just added a few more generals to the “bad hombres” list:

    “The governor of Aragua, Rodolfo Marco Torres; the Minister of Frontier and Peace, Gerardo Izquierdo Torres; the retired General of the Division, Francisco Rangel Gómez and the Bolivarian National Guard, Fabio Zavarse Pabón.”

    “As a result of the sanctions, all the assets that these four officials own in US territory will be frozen, and they will be prohibited from having commercial relations with US citizens.”

    https://www.aporrea.org/ddhh/n320698.html

  9. Arturo Perez Reverte put it best:

    “Juntas a un fanático o un malvado con 1.000 tontos y, matemáticamente, obtienes 1.001 hijos de la gran puta.”

    That is, to me, the definition of chavismo.

  10. Excellent article, I have been able to hear the complaints of payment and food of the people who work at Pdvsa Gas Anaco, it is a complete mockery that the PDVSA company that was one of the best in the world has fallen so low, thanks to the policies deploram and populist of this government, who use the resources of the state company to finance political campaigns and even criminal groups … I did an internship in PDVSA Gas Anaco in 2011, for several years I did interviews there in the state company, I did the medical exams to get to work and they never called me again, but I have seen how family members of managers enter and that they do not have any degree of instruction, but that they are affected by the government … in the end they destroyed the company of the country

  11. For the narco-regime, a large population serves one purpose only: as cover (e.g. as human shield).

    But then, neighboring countries must care enough about the life or death of that large population that serves as shield. If they do NOT…the narco-regime can conclude that it is in it’s best interest to depopulate the country.

    Moreover: Forced emigration as the new weapon of mass destruction against neighboring countries.

    I think this is where we are with Venezuela. Remember, Holomodor is not in fashion. But the goal is still the same: to get rid of the annoying population and keep the entire country for oneself.

  12. Very good (and sad) piece.

    Just a comment. Drilling is performed by a Rig. You do not operate drills, you operate rigs or drilling rigs.So PDV## and PDV$$ are RIGS, not Drills.
    Cheers

    • Back in the day I read a pop fiction book by someone like Forsyth or Follett which involved the Middle East and also oil. It talked about a “tip” on a rig to replace the drill bit. Trip, not tip.

  13. “The article is too PC. They are leaving and protesting because there is nothing left to steal, the guisos are getting scarce. Same with the other state companies employees that are protesting. Let’s call a spade a spade.”

    Exactly.

    But God forbid anyone dares to say anything bad about our beloved “bravo pueblo”, always the poor victims, soooo honest, sooo hard-working, sooo well educated..

  14. “MRubio if he’s paid Nicky his due for the 2017 fiscal year? That tear gas is expensive.”

    There are a lot of things I could nitpick in this comment, but… tear gas? really? did you know it’s been over a decade our currency lost all of its value outside venezuela? I’d have as much luck buying tear gas with a folded paper I dub the “carupanero” as the government using the bolivar to import anything.

  15. There are some translation errors. The most glaring is “… workers working on drilling, production, wallcover and flyway.” These are all rigs. “Wallcover” is certainly “workover”, but I have no idea what “flyway” is. Lightweight? There are some references to “drills”, probably from the Spanish “taladros”, but those should be “drilling rigs”

    These are quibbles. Great story.

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