Photo: Globovisión


Panama adopted the lists published by other countries about Venezuelan citizens (natural, judicial or final beneficiaries) politically exposed (PEPs) to money laundering and the financing of terrorism, in order to prevent these crimes. The National Committee against Money Laundering, Financing of Terrorism and the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction issued two resolutions, one about the prevention of acts of terrorism by the UN Security Council, and another urging the countries to adopt policies and procedures to limit PEP operations and transactions. So far in the Venezuelan case, we’re talking about 55 natural persons and 16 companies. Panama is the first Latin American country to adopt measures against Venezuelan government officials.

Venezuelan PEPs

Starting with Nicolás, there are 55 current and former chavista officials which are considered by Panama to be “of high risk in terms of money laundering, financing of terrorism and financing of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.” The initial list includes all CNE authorities: Tibisay Lucena, Tania D’amelio, Socorro Hernández and Sandra Oblitas. From the TSJ, Maikel Moreno Pérez, Lourdes Suárez Anderson, Calixto Ortega and Gladys Gutiérrez; also imposed prosecutor general Tarek William Saab. From the ministerial cabinet, María Iris Varela Rangel, Ernesto Villegas, Elías Jaua, Néstor Reverol Torres and Carlos Osorio. From the brass: Antonio Benavides Torres, Gustavo González López, Fabio Zavarse Pabón and Bladimir Lugo. From the governors and mayors, we have Rodolfo Marco Torres, Carmen Meléndez and Erika Farías. And from PSUV: Diosdado Cabello, Hermann Escarrá, Freddy Bernal, Adán Chávez Frías, Américo Mata, Alejandro Fleming, Elvis Amoroso, Carlos Malpica Flores, Justo Noguera, Julián Isaias Rodríguez, Francisco Ameliach, Carlos Rotondaro, Simón Zerpa, Carmen Zuleta, Katherine Haringhton and Francisco Rangel Gómez. These persons are banned from carrying out commercial or financial operations in Panama. The Ministry of Economy and Finance remarked that this list will be updated.

Official silence

The fire in the dungeons of the Carabobo Police Command appeared on important international media but not in the public media system. Apart from the three tweets of imposed prosecutor general Tarek William Saab and a statement issued by governor Rafael Lacava promising new prisoners, the 68 known victims of this tragedy are invisible for the State. Neither Prisons minister Iris Varela nor Interior minister Néstor Reverol have issued any statements. Official media only shows the Holy Week translated in security campaigns, churches to visit and adequate beaches. Governor Lacava says in his statement: “we assume the commitment to create a higher security council (…) to allow clearing out of police detention facilities and the creation of new spaces for prisoners in Carabobo state,” adding that the culprits “must pay for their crimes they’ve committed both in action and in omission,” sending condolences, support and solidarity to the families. Moving.

The flip side of the cell

The bodies of the 68 victims at Policarabobo headquarters were treated even worse than they were treated in life. The recount from the yard where the autopsies were practices describes the violation of several protocols, the serial butchery to open bodies and close them back with plastic bag threads in less than 15 minutes each to fill express death certificates, as denounced by NGO Proiuris. And thus, the bodies were handed to the families of the victims, as they demanded justice and an investigation on the incident. From one of the windows of the Policarabobo Station, some survivors of the fire shouted their version to the media, explaining the detail that they were doused in gasoline and that everything started with a clash with police officers. They say the number of casualties is much higher than the confirmed by prosecutor Saab and they pointed out that one of the deceased was a visitor.

Investigate the incident

Lawmaker Juan Guaidó announced that the National Assembly will open and investigation on the deaths of these 68 citizens. The United Nations Commission for Human Rights urged Venezuelan authorities to carry out an expedient investigation, expressing their consternation for this incident and denouncing the general overcrowding and the terrible detention conditions in Venezuela. European Parliament Speaker Antonio Tajani wrote: “How much longer will Maduro’s dictatorship cause the death of his citizens? Profound solidarity with the families of those killed in the fire in Carabobo!”; adding the prediction that democracy will win out in Venezuela.

A new frog!

Scientists from Venezuela and Colombia identified a new frog species in the Perijá mountain range. The Hyloscirtus japreria lives in rivers and streams at an altitude of 1,000 meters and it was discovered during expeditions carried out a decade ago. Its name pays homage to the japreria, a dwindling native tribe in Perijá, Zulia state. With this finding, published on the scientific journal Zootaxa, there are 37 species from the Hyloscirtus genus. The work made by AFP has beautiful details about the scientific effort of these biologists which included bioacoustics analysis in habitats so complex that they can only be accessed on foot after days of travelling. It’s a beautiful accomplishment to get to know our biodiversity.

Abroad

  • The Cucuta Diocese donated 250,000 communion wafers to the Catholic Church of Venezuela so it can celebrate the central mysteries of the Holy Week, staving off our shortage crisis. The wafers were handed over at the Simón Bolívar International Bridge.
  • Florida governor Rick Scott signed the law banning the state and its agencies from doing business with companies that have engaged in commercial transactions of have “collaborated” with the Venezuelan government.
  • Yesterday, the UN restated that it has no plans to send electoral observers to May 20 elections and clarified that they rarely ever establish those missions. Jeffrey Feltman, undersecretary for Political Affairs, remarked that the UN only intervenes in electoral processes to try and improve the voting system to “improve the election’s integrity and technical merits.”The invitation for lawmaker Julio Borges to attend the Summit of the Americas as representative for Venezuela was ratified.
  • Yesterday, Guyana requested the International Court of Justice to confirm that the arbitration award of 1899 on their borders with Venezuela is legal, valid and binding. Foreign minister Carl Greenidge delivered the request to ICJ Secretary Philippe Couvreur. According to Guyana, Venezuela never showed any evidence to justify their late repudiation of the Award of 1899.

The University of Los Andes (ULA) was founded on March 29, 1785, under the name of Royal Seminar College of San Buenaventura of Mérida, which would later be elevated to seminar and finally recognized as an university on September 21, 1810. Yesterday, the ULA turned 233 years old.

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39 COMMENTS

  1. “Panama is the first Latin American country to adopt measures against Venezuelan government officials.”

    Good news, but why is Panama important? The Narco-Tyranny will be quick to declare it was just another order from the US Empire, while they continue to ship Tons of Gold worldwide, where no one could find it. Did Chavista Mega-Thieves have their millions hidden in Panama banks? Perhaps Reverol or Padrino, they are dumb as shit.

    • Nah.. if they were dumb as shit, they would have invested it in the Petro. (tee hee… thats funny right there…)

      My guess is that they have it in various Russian banking entities. The remainder in real estate throughout the Caribbean. That is what I would do.

    • “Panama is the first Latin American country to adopt measures against Venezuelan government officials.”

      Good news, yes.
      Is it not strange though that as an atypical latino reaction to the venezuelan problem, they are doing some of the shouting, but did absolutely no action to oust this tyranny.
      So you have America, UK, Canada, the whole EU, Switzerland etc etc all doing sanctions on a country that has no immediate threat to them (i know America declared them a National Security threat)
      And what have the selfish Latin American countries, of which the situation effects the most done to publicly rebuke and stand in solidarity with democracy and an end to tyranny?
      As an Englishman living here, all i see is shame and double standards, Latinos should be a little more introspective and see themselves for what they are. What a pathetic situation!

      Its all ok though, as the Americans will invade and spill blood for you………..really?

      • “Its all ok though, as the Americans will invade and spill blood for you………..really?”

        I can’t help but wonder where this line of thinking comes from. Who is putting this into peoples heads? Here in the states, you would be hard pressed to find ANY information about Venezuela. It certainly isn’t in the evening news, and rarely do I see anything about Chavismo on cable news. I doubt half the government educated automatons could find Venezuela on a map. I haven’t talked to a single politically aware person who has mentioned (even in passing) Venezuela.

        It has to be coming from the Venezuelan end. Is it wishful thinking? I know that Maduro likes to throw it out there periodically to whip up nationalistic sentiment, but I honestly want to know WHO is spreading this ridiculous gospel of US military intervention?

        I believe that Maduro would LOVE for the US to invade, as it would absolve Chavismo from any culpability for their incompetence. “¡Mira! El Yanqui has plotted this from the beginning! The guerra económica! Chavismo works, only it wasn’t allowed to!” And of course, the fawning Dumb Masses would lap it up… waiting again for Round Two.

        • I think the original comment was referring to several commenters on here advocating for the US to send the Marines in for a quick and easy operation to overthrow the dictatorship.

          • The overwhelming point of note, as i have said on previous post, is that of the 20 countries in Latin America, or 33 if you include the Caribbean, only now at the start of April 2018 do we have THE FIRST LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRY TO SANCTION VENEZUELA!
            Latin American countries need to look at their own understanding of morality and justice, as they have clearly weakened substantially.
            This will be among the main historical revelations of the Venezuelan debacle in the future.
            Shamefull.

        • The overwhelming point of note, as i have said on previous post, is that of the 20 countries in Latin America, or 33 if you include the Caribbean, only now at the start of April 2018 do we have THE FIRST LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRY TO SANCTION VENEZUELA!
          Latin American countries need to look at their own understanding of morality and justice, as they have clearly weakened substantially.
          This will be one of the main historical revelations of the Venezuelan debacle in the future.
          To the shame of Latin America.

          • its annoying when you are timed out on posting a comment so you type it again, if there was an edit facility i would have deleted the second one!

          • Exactly, a bunch of pencil dicks thusfar as compared to the Northern Free World.

            Maybe here we have a bunch of leaders who are almost as corrupt (Kleptozuela is on a whole other level and the envy of any klepto). Hey look what just went down in Peru, maybe that is why they are not lifting a figure.

            It is interesting to find out why more sanctions are not coming from the neighbors…Mexico, Colombia, Costa Rica, Panama, Trinidad, Brazil, Argentina…or if they are just waiting for right moment.

            El Nacional had a really good graphic on this earlier in the week and I can not find it now, but it was a breakdown of sanctions by country and what chavista scumbag they were applied to (want to see some MUD scumbags on there as well in future).

            Cumbre de las Americas will be big. Would like to see some good analysis on this.

      • Please don’t call us Latinos. That’s a word coined by the US left in an atempt to create a homogeneous identity which they then claim to represent. It’s part of an identity politics strategy I object to. I’m Cuban, other latinoamericans (not Latinos) did NOTHING to help us deal with the Castro dictatorship. Therefore I don’t feel I have much in common with them. I help Venezuelans because I’ve lived in country for many years. So it’s a personal issue. But Venezuelans should not expect much real help from other nations. Maduro is a Castroite metastasis, and as such none of these “Latinos” will do anything. And many of them are communists, will cheer and help even if this genocide kills one million Venezuelans.

  2. “Scientists from Venezuela and Colombia identified a new frog species in the Perijá mountain range. The Hyloscirtus japreria lives in rivers and streams at an altitude of 1,000 meters and it was discovered during expeditions carried out a decade ago. Its name pays homage to the japreria, a dwindling native tribe in Perijá, Zulia state. With this finding, published on the scientific journal Zootaxa, there are 37 species from the Hyloscirtus genus. ”

    That’s just Henri Falcon mutating during his Semana Santa vacation.

  3. “Yesterday, Guyana requested the International Court of Justice to confirm that the arbitration award of 1899 on their borders with Venezuela is legal, valid and binding. Foreign minister Carl Greenidge delivered the request to ICJ Secretary Philippe Couvreur. According to Guyana, Venezuela never showed any evidence to justify their late repudiation of the Award of 1899.”

    Ever since I read about this snit years ago, I have been of the belief that Chavismo will us it to divert attention away from whatever tragedy of the moment they are enduring.

    I sense that the minute that social unrest erupts throughout the country, Maduro will deploy the military to the Essequibo region to “put down a Yanqui led, Guyanese invasion” (!) of Venezuela sovereign territory in order to whip of nationalistic fervor.

    Heaven help the hapless Guyanese Federal Credit Union part-time employee who might be wandering past a border checkpoint during such an event… to be on the receiving end of such military Chavista rage… he is liable to be taken and branded a saboteur and agent of Yanqui intrigue and espionage!

    • Q lawyer friend of mine wrote a report a few years ago and was able to convince me that this is a lost cause for Venezuela. It is worth noting that Venezuela formally recognized the 1898 arbitration ruling and even issued official maps and postage stamps that showed those boundaries. The lawyer for Venezuela(Severo Mallet Prevost) wrote a letter to be opened after his death(1948) that alleged irregularities in the arbitration, but I do not understand why he wrote a letter that would have no legal weight. Then sometime in the 1960s the Accion Democratica party decided this case could be used to whip up nationalist fervor, leading to the situation we have today. This is one of the cases that makes vennies lose their cookies, many otherwise rational venezuelans go apeshit if you question Venezuela’s claim to the Esequibo.

      • Just another example of whipping up fervent nationalism, oh wait didnt the Argentinians try to do the same with Galtieri and their Military Junta?
        Falklands 1982……. thats when you find out what fighting a war is all about, and its a lot harder than subjecting your own populace to abuse!
        I would not want the fat arepa eating Veno military to make the same mistake.

  4. Individual economic sanctions against prominent Chavistoide Mega-Crooks are nice and dandy. First with Obama and the US (see how much that affected them), then Macron and the EU, whatever they have done, then Switzerland, that was great, if only symbolically, and now Panama.. hopefully this will set a precedent for the rest of semi-civilized 3rd World in Latin America to tighten the noose.

    But what has happened and will continue to happen? Very simple: They get better at hiding their stolen millions and they steal some more. Just be feel more comfortable, for kicks and laughs. They get creative and wiser at laundering money, using different names, aliases, fake companies, distant family members and unknown complicit “friends”. Then they diversify. Rule #1, if you’re not an utterly retarded, severely lobotomized Chavistoide thief: Diversify. Some here under that unrelated name, some properties there in Antigua, Barbados, St Vincent and other Oil Slave Leeches in the Caribbean. Then get creative, and diversify some more: The Klepto-Petro: designed for money laudering, perfect. Gold: By the Metric Tons to the Middle East now. Under who knows what Saudi or Iranian names and companies. Plus the Chinese, Russian Mafia connections to hide more millions and diversify even more. Bribe lots of complicit crooks, including in Panama, and especially Latin America buddies, Bolivia, Nicaragua, Ecuador.. and hide some more. Cabello, Tarek, Rodriguez and all, they must be cagados de la risa with this Panama new circus. They must be laughing out loud, all the way to countless unidentifiable bank accounts worldwide. Plus mansions and properties, or Stocks under Maikel Moreno’s niece’s aunt’s name. Plus Gold vaults who-knows-where now.

    • Not quite accurate Poet. The US financial sanctions are strangling the once great pdvsa. It is a slow death for everyone, but virtually inevitable. No one can do business with Venezuela in $US. With that others are joining in. When there is nothing left to steal or eat, when the trickle of exiles rises to a torrent, when the collectivos turn on themselves, the “brave” standing army deserts.. then something wil happen. It’s ugly and nasty, and slow. But as the sub point of the article, finally a LA country places sanctions. Why not Colombia? Because they are making money (quico?) and not until the exodus is costly and painful will they or others do anything. At least it is something, at least someone(s) doing for Venezuelans that won’t do for themselves.

  5. “the serial butchery to open bodies and close them back with plastic bag threads in less than 15 minutes each to fill express death certificates”

    And here I thought plastic bags served only as Venezuelan electrical tape. Learn something new every day.

      • I can’t say I’ve ever seen a roll of duct tape in Venezuela.

        John, Crystal is still in intensive care, improving slowly but surely. The plan is to get her well enough that they can add some weight to her and then do a kidney transplant from her mother. I think if they can manage that, the outlook will be much brighter because the recurring theme with the doctors is that they don’t know how she’s surviving with the single kidney she has.

        Thanks for all you do my friend.

  6. What would be helpful (at least to me) is to have (more?) links embedded in these updates, that a person could click on to get to the source.

  7. I would imagine that the story appearing in the Miami Herald last week concerning the up coming U.S. military exercises/war games in Trinidad and Tobago may have ratcheted up the hopes in Venezuelan that the drills are dress rehearsal for something more. I don’t think that is the case. I think it is a matter of let’s be ready just in in case the bottom falls out sooner than we think it will.

  8. “Its all ok though, as the Americans will invade and spill blood for you………..really?”

    This is what many “Gringos” here or there fail to comprehend:

    It IS in the United States’ OWN INTEREST to intervene in Kleptozuela. (Who said “Invade??)

    As a US Citizen I tell you its in our own interest to Strangle Chavismo economically first (no more oil cash, zero, no more gasoline). And then, since that probably won’t be enough for the “bravo” pueblo to revolt, then briefly intervene military. (1-2 weeks, a few choppers, few dozen troops, that’s it, if well coordinated with local malcontents) Hand it to the MUD and get the hell out.

    WHY is it in our selfish own Geo-political and economic interest? I don’t feel like typing now. Suffice it to say that rich Venezuela, double the size of France, smack in the middle of our own continent, our own backyard ain’t no little tropical island named Cuba. It’s just becoming a serious pain in the neck for us Gringos, comprende? We don’t need Chavismo to spread in our entire Region, (Colombia, Mexico, even Brazil could be next) Plus the DEA is pissed off already having all the freaking Drugs in the world from Colombia, Bolivia and Mexico, all being shipped outta Narco-Kleptozuela. Sick of it.

    • Im not a gringo and take offence to that title.
      I would currently say that even with John Bolton and Mattis in place America is not in a politically convenient space to invade anyone.
      With the political ramifications internally of the forthcoming investigations into Clinton, Obama, Comey, Mc Cabe, Strozk, Paige etc etc due to see oxygen in the next few months, the last thing that American Trump supporters will want, is the nightly news to be taken up by an American intervention in Venezuela and not the destruction of the Democratic party.
      Trump has no intent for foreign conflict involving American soldiers.
      “1-2 weeks, a few choppers, few dozen troops, that’s it, if well coordinated with local malcontents) Hand it to the MUD and get the hell out.”
      I was involved in the military incursions of both Kosovo in 1999 and Iraq in 2003, and in my opinion anyone who has such a flippant attitude to invasions is sadly deluded.

    • Seriously now on top of the copy and paste daily message you are claiming that drugs come from Mexico through Venezuela to the US? Going to have to do better than that for Tillerson/err Pompeo.

    • Poeta your comments are hugely irritating to read. You have NO FUCKING CLUE about Venezuelan, Latin American or US politics or interests. Please get it through your thick skull that even if all the worlds troubles would be solved over night and the only problem left would be Venezuela the next morning Trump wakes up, HE STILL AIN’T SENDING 1 SINGLE SOLDIER TO CARACAS!!! EVERRRRRRR!!! You’re almost as ignorant as those chavistas you write about …. no …… you ARE as ignorant (and irritating) as those cunts.

    • I disagree. The cost of an invasion would easily top a trillion dollars. So, where is the benefit for the US? Other than an ever diminishing supply of pretty poor quality crude to the states – that only a few refineries are geared up to process – the US gets no benefit from Venezuela. Venezuela’s political influence throughout the region has mirrored the slow death of Chavez. Why spend the money when the country is imploding. Yes, it is a tragedy for all Venezuelans. But it is easier and less costly to facilitate the demise of this regime via sanctions and other means. The USA will not invade. They didn’t invade Cuba even at the height of the cold war. They won’t do it in Venezuela, either.

  9. Traditionally the two most important countries in the world for people who need to stash ill gotten gains in some bank account where they cant be discovered are Panama and Switzerland, that these two countries have within 24 hours of each other taken measures that condem the regime most explicity and gone after the assets of its most important officials with the argument that they are corrupt is very telling !! Dont know that its ever happened before ……the degree of international rejection to the regime is every passing day becoming more and more damming …..add to that the decision not only confirming that Maduro is not invited to the summit of the Americas but that in his stead Borges from the National Assembly is to represent Venezuela in the summit , a summit which President Trump will attend on his first ever visit to an international conference in Latin America….!! Worst of all is the impression that this is only one step in an scalating set of programmed steps which are being prepared against the regime …….

    At the same time Falcon who had made a point of there being international electoral oversight by the UN for the voting to be considered possible is now advised officially by the UN that it wil not be sending anyone to the elections ….., meantime you have the horrible massacre of prisioners at Carabobo and Guayanas taking the Esequivo dispute to the International Court of Justice , two events that put the govt against the ropes .!!

    They are putting the screws on the regime and its response is to talk of how meanie the US is in expelling russias diplomats , to us Venezuelans of course the news of the hour !! These are not good times for the regime …not at all!!

    • Bill your points are illustrating the type of issue that people should orientate onto, ‘Real Politik’
      There is no time to be looking at this issue from simplistic cause and effect, this whole play is on a much broader stage.
      Catch up has begun, and the domino has hit its neighbour, another will fall, then another.
      Chavismo is no longer controlling events.

    • Bill,

      I am inclined to agree that coordinated actions by national powers are in play here. However, these plans have not yet passed the point of no return.

      If I were to speculate, I would guess that what has been done to date is in preparation, but that the final decision to commit, or not, will be made by the heads of state at the Summit of the Americas.

  10. I still can’t understand…and will never understand…

    The ridiculous point of view that a U.S. military intervention will play into Maduro’s hands. Seriously. What are you guys smoking?

    He’ll be dead within hours of Marines on the ground if that’s what is required, and not dead by the Marines.

  11. Ira—I can only speak for myself but the argument would go as follows; if there is an US intervention then the failure of Chavismo policies do not play out to their disastrous end and they have an everlasting excuse for failure. Whereas if things are allowed to “play out” they will be discredited for the foreseeable future.

    My take and I have had a “slight” bit too much to drink for anyone to listen to me so give others responses more credence.

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