Short-Lighted

For Wednesday, August 1, 2018. Translated by Javier Liendo.

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Photo: El Nacional

In addition to the torture that Zulia and Táchira states have to live daily, ravaged by a low electric energy distribution that has nothing to do with planning, this Tuesday, there was a blackout that lasted several hours in Caracas, some areas of Miranda, Vargas and Aragua. Electric Energy Minister Luis Motta Domínguez, in another exercise of spite of Venezuelans, first said that heavy rains (amidst raining season) in Santa Teresa del Tuy explained the incident. But after the malfunction repeated, Motta summed up a report from the Bolivarian Service of National Intelligence (SEBIN) which justified the blackout saying that “the control wiring for tension transformers was cut” and showing a worker without protection or equipment, he added that those cut wires caused a system lockdown.

Later, Minister Jorge Rodríguez spoke of an identified failure, claiming that it was difficult to make repairs due to weather conditions at the Guatopo National Park —hard to reach, according to him— contradicting the area and the status announced by Motta. Rodríguez added that three tropical waves will affect the coastline and will cause “hydric difficulty” in some coasts.

Nicolás and electric energy

Strictly speaking, if the electric system still works at all, it’s because there were considerable investments in the past to develop it. Chavismo has only brought corruption, disinvestment and lack of maintenance, as well as a severe deprofessionalization of the sector. Nicolás has been explaining system failures for five years, without announcing investments or maintenance labor: in 2013, he proposed militarizing all electric substations and making a “special plan against sabotage,” as well as decreeing electric service as paramount to State security. In September that year, he denounced an “electrical coup” and in October, he blamed Henrique Capriles, Leopoldo López and María Corina Machado for all sabotages. By September 2014, he’d created the theory of a guerrilla that caused the malfunctions. In November 2015, Nicolás “denounced” a plan for a great national blackout and announced the arrest of five (electrocuted) perpetrators in the dress rehearsal. By April 2016, he was already speaking of a “true electric emergency” situation, except he blamed it on the “extreme drought” and activated a plan against the weather phenomenon El Niño. In October 2017, he asked the ANC to modify the laws to suspend benefits in the sentences against system saboteurs, and then in February this year, he once again “militarily armored” the system. As you see, it’s a very serious problem, handled with brazenness.

With the governors

After being ratified as PSUV chairman and violating the party’s statutes, now enjoying absolute power for his decisions, yesterday, Nicolás demanded chavista governors and “protectors” (figures imposed in states with opposition governors) to quit “the excuses and the whining” so they can start “birthing” the necessary solutions, promising all the weight of the law on those who try to sabotage the economic measures he announced and talking of new measures to beat down speculation, inflation and recover workers’ purchasing power; but of course: with more price controls.

The guy with absolute powers urged “a great democratization of all government instances.” In order to stick to the script I just summed up for you in the previous paragraph, and contradicting ministers Motta and Rodríguez, Nicolás explained the blackout as one more “sabotage”, claiming that they’re investigating: “In a few hours, we’ll know who’s responsible, don’t be shocked with the political masterminds of these mischiefs,” he cautioned. In his sham version, Caraqueños reacted with “morality, support, understanding.” Lying is a compulsion.

Amazing chavismo

There was another bit of information where Nicolás’s and minister Jorge Rodríguez’s versions didn’t align, because even though the former set August 3 as the date to start the vehicle census, Rodríguez announced it would start this Wednesday, August 1, and he also said that it would take place through the carnet de la patria website (patria.org.ve), he didn’t offer any more details on the process.

Interior Minister Néstor Reverol met with rectors of several universities to work on the security issue. He proposed the activation of some “peace quadrants” —whose ineffectiveness we’ve already confirmed— opening the question of how and to what extent this policy will affect university autonomy. Reverol also met with SAIME authorities to work on “the service’s profound transformation and restructuring.” He mentioned that there are almost a hundred thousand unretrieved passports that they’re planning to use as material for new documents, although they’re working with the ional Mint Currency Houseto issue new passports. CANTV employees spoke yesterday about the lack of resources to offer a quality service, demanding improved workplace conditions and denouncing the company’s utter decay: no transports, supplies or tools for repairs and emphasized a key detail: in the rooms that house the equipment for the operation of phone lines and internet, the air conditioners are out of order.

Briefs and serious

  • At least 2,700 people have been affected in Amazonas by a flood of Orinoco river, caused by the rains, as explained by Sidney Rodríguez, head of Civil Defense in the area. For former governor Liborio Guarulla, this flood is “the largest of the last century,” criticizing the government’s indifference to the situation, saying that Amazonas natives “have been forced to go to Colombia” because this country did activate an emergency plan to help.
  • At the border between Venezuela and Colombia, Army lieutenant Roberto Carlos Ulpin González (27) was murdered near the Perija mountain range, a Zulia area where the guerrilla and Venezuelan paramilitaries are vying for control of illegal trade. Whether the culprits were Los Pelusos gang, the ELN or the EPL, it’s unclear.
  • Over 55 cancer patients lack medicines for their treatment in Venezuela, denounced Codevida director Francisco Valencia. In 2018, they’ve recorded the death of 11 transplant patients for the same reason.
  • Just like on Monday, President Juan Manuel Santos said that he sees Nicolás’s government close to the end, yesterday Luisa Ortega Díaz said: “Resign, how long will you keep Venezuelans suffering? Your days are numbered,” said Luisa, to later claim: “Maduro told me that he wouldn’t leave power even if he lost an election.” Coherence isn’t her trademark. In any case, she claimed that she’s making progress with the trial for corruption with Odebrecht.

  • Ah! Peruvian Foreign Minister Néstor Popolizio announced that several countries in the region are studying the possibility of asking the International Criminal Court’s Prosecutor for a preliminary investigation about the human rights situation in Venezuela.

It’s been 100 days of civic rebellion in Nicaragua against the government of dictator Daniel Ortega. The balance is bleak. Following chavismo’s path, yesterday in an official event, the Army’s chief proclaimed the institution’s “apolitical and non-deliberative nature,” but among the FSLN’s red-and-black flags. This Thursday, the OAS Permanent Council will debate a resolution against the Nicaraguan crisis.

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20 COMMENTS

  1. So… to shutdown the power grid to several states all a person has to do is to cut some colorful wires? As the comrade said working on fixing it means some dude with snips and electrical tape? I was under the impression that the Brave Sovereign Bolivarian Armed Forces were tasked in securing electrical installations. Sorry arse troops.

  2. The issue is not they made up the cut “colorful wires” excuse, it is that at least 1/2 the uneducated population actually believes the story!

    • Do you mean to say that I could wander over to a pile of construction debris at my job site, pull out some wire from it, photograph it and tweet it to the Dumb Masses as “proof” of my work site being sabotaged… and the Dumb Masses would believe it?

      Man, I’m going to try that sort of “proof” on all sorts of stuff today. I wonder if everyone falls for that? I’m going to download a picture of a Saturn 5 rocket today and use it as proof that I am an astronaut. Because seeing is believing!

      • YUP ….. You could try using the Saturn 5 rocket picture with a sub-caption of “North Korea’s new ballistic missile. That would also work 🙂

      • “…and the Dumb Masses would believe it?”
        They desire to believe every official lie, just as they desire to believe in chavismo/marxism even though they know it’s false and destructive. Self-hate brings out the worst of human nature.

        • Ira, seems like the skill sets of the iguanas are improving weekly. Must be the ongoing CIA training. It is really bearing fruit now! If they could train some little birds to go talk to Maduro and convince him that they were sent by Chavez to tell him Chavez wants him to come join Chavez in Paradise.

  3. Strictly speaking, if the electric system still works at all, it’s because there were considerable investments in the past to develop it. Chavismo has only brought corruption, disinvestment and lack of maintenance, as well as a severe deprofessionalization of the sector.

    CC, the Devil, and Daniel responded to the 2010 Guri crisis with exemplary discourses on the history of the electrical energy sector. Commenters also pitched in. From those postings there were two main points.
    1) Droughts, with a resulting reduction in hydroelectric capacity, have been a recurring part of the weather since day 1. Those who managed electricity generation took periodic droughts into account in designing the electricity generation system.
    2)There were already plans in place to increase hydroelectric capacity when El Finado took office in 1999. He ignored and/or delayed implementation of these plans.

    Recall those doofuses who claimed that the problems of electricity supply in Chavista Venezuela were problems of success- of increased consumption. Those claims ignored two main facts:
    1) Electricity consumption has always been increasing, not just during Chavismo.
    2) Venezuela’s increase in per capita electricity consumption during Chavismo was one of the lowest such increases in Latin America, yet Venezuela was the only country with electricity supply issues.

    Chavismo- few worse at running a country, but few better at acquiring and maintaining power.

  4. It’s been 100 days of civic rebellion in Nicaragua against the government of dictator Daniel Ortega. The balance is bleak. Following chavismo’s path, yesterday in an official event, the Army’s chief proclaimed the institution’s “apolitical and non-deliberative nature,” but among the FSLN’s red-and-black flags.

    Daniel Ortega’s brother,Humberto Ortega, ran the Nicaraguan armed forces from 1979 to 1995. Allegedly the armed forces became non-political. Or instead of the armed forces, various Sandinista paramilitary gangs now do the dirty work.

  5. “…President Juan Manuel Santos said that he sees Nicolás’s government close to the end…” I wonder, did Che see Castro’s government close to the end?”

    Talk is cheap: “Peruvian Foreign Minister Néstor Popolizio announced that several countries in the region are studying the possibility of asking the International Criminal Court’s Prosecutor for a preliminary investigation about the human rights situation in Venezuela.” Eventually one must accept that every indoctrinated leftist has blood on their hands.

    • A lot of qualifiers in that mumbo jumbo. And a lot of very subjective terms help too, like…

      Soon, we will try to get some electricity to as many of the people as often as possible.

      I should be in politics!

  6. Gordon Rives Jr. The assembly referred to in the article is the national assembly which is completely toothless and powerless these days. And no, Maduro does not give a crap what they say.

    • I expect that when things get to crisis level, the Chavistas will offer up a carrot… new elections and an opportunity to “power share”… because what dickhead MUD politician doesn’t believe that they might be able to pull the next one off against the Chavismo machine? (As if the Chavistas would power share!)

      Mark my words, the Chavistas are going to insist on a reset so that they can gain another 3-6 months before their next rigged elections, and the oppo’s “usual suspects” will be front and center, yapping like lap-dogs at their next NEW opportunity. The likes of Falcon and Allup cannot help themselves.

      Don’t fall for it, Venezuelans. Chavismo owns all of this, and nothing short of them getting on a private jet heading to Havana (with a plane full of stolen loot) will fix your country. The die-hard Chavista voter has to have a “come to Jesus moment” and a lot of people are going to have to become very angry (and possibly very deceased) before the Chavists run away.

      Where/who is the REAL opposition? Not Allup/Machado/Falcon/Capriles/Lopez. I mean the opposition party that isn’t Chavismo Lite? Which candidate is going to tell the truth about what is ahead for Venezuela? Because it is going to take a Hell of a lot of sacrifice and a HUGE Marshall Plan that comes with a VERY specific price that El Pueblo (and the FANB) isn’t going to like.

      • “Chavismo owns all of this, and nothing short of them getting on a private jet heading to Havana (with a plane full of stolen loot) will fix your country. The die-hard Chavista voter has to have a “come to Jesus moment” and a lot of people are going to have to become very angry (and possibly very deceased) before the Chavists run away.”

        You’ve got that one straight on the head!!!

      • “…and possibly very deceased…”
        There it is. That’s what everyone is so reluctant to admit. Dislike it as much as you want, history shows us that is how it works. (Stand by to be called a Fascist.)

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