Since when is “marching” a right in Venezuela? [UPDATED]

    32

    Live updates on the march to the National Electoral Council.

    As you can see, the opposition’s march to the CNE is being welcomed with open arms.

    "Las Nalgas de Rómulo" bridge in Caracas
    “Las Nalgas de Rómulo” bridge in Caracas

    Eventually, the march decided to go around the national guard barricade, over the Güaire sewage river and through a dirt path, and ultimately made it to another military blockade, where some tear gas was fired.

    IMG_2601
    IMG_2584

     

     

    And ... we're off.
    And … we’re off.

    Henrique Capriles was pepper-sprayed in the face by National Guard agents, who did not allow the march to go through.

    IMG_2619

    Other marches in Venezuela that ended up in cases of repression include: Barinas, where there are reports of some injured activists, Bolívar and Aragua.

    There were several marches in different cities around the country that effectively reached their respective CNE offices, even if some were closed: In Apure, Táchira, Trujillo, Yaracuy, Sucre, Falcón, Mérida, Cojedes, Anzoategui, per our reports.

    Final note: a single, lonesome UCV student made it all the way to the CNE headquarters in Caracas and held up a sign asking for the Recall Referendum. A military goon took his sign, and he was arrested.

    MUD has announced a new march will take place this Saturday.

    32 COMMENTS

    1. Nada grave, ni especial, ni relevante.

      Lo mismo de siempre. Se anuncia una marcha veinte años antes, el gobierno les cierra todos los caminos y luego les tira gas.

      El mismo libreto cansino e inútil de siempre.

    2. The best thing that could have happened to the marches nationwide is that they were blocked, with Capriles’s face pepper-sprayed–this will be the national/international takeaway, not the not-so-great numbers of marchers….

      • Of course, let us not forget that showing up to those marches has a real probability of mortal danger. So I can see why people would rather sit it out.

        Now, sitting it out is acquiesces to Chavsimo. So pick your poison, Chavismo intimidates you to submission or you play the death lottery run by ‘colectivos’.

        Ultimately, traditional escualidos are bad revolutionaries, it is better to bid your luck in some new found country as a political refugee of some sort than expose yourself to become cannon fodder.

        Meantime, el pueblo puro wil go very hungry as Chavismo keeps digging the hole of despair deeper and deeper.

        Chavismo is sadly self inflicted. Yup, they adored ‘el galactico’ and like any prostitute, the bill is now due.

        I’ll go drink now to forget. We’ll see tomorrow…

        • Those without families to support, primarily the young, will be the ones who continue the struggle in the streets. As is always the case in resistance or revolutionary movements.

      • Blocked marches have been a staple of chavismo for years, with no consequences.

        I can´t see how this one surfaces as “the special one”

        • This particular march had a specific constitutional right objective–that the Regime comply with the RR requisites so that Venezuela can, perhaps, achieve a peaceful solution to its impasse. Most marches in the past, much more multitudinous than these, have simply expressed general discontent with the Govt.

      • Look at how the situation in Venezuela is being reported on. International press is next to non-existent. North American press is even worse. There are events occurring in Venezuela that are not reported on in the mainstream press. A good friend of mine tells me what he is hearing in the Latin American press. I go to Google (English) and it’s rare that it appears as soon as it does where he is looking.
        Why? Little is being taken as seriously as it should. This is what happens when the government acts like a bunch of idiots on the International stage.

    3. Sounds to me like the general populatiion, at this point, are no more than walking zombies.Standing for hours listlessly in colas, locking themselves inside their houses after dark, accepting the daily murders/assassinations as though it’s normal, etc.The future looks grim.

    4. El final de esa marcha estaba cantado de antemano.

      Julio Coco, que debe de saber algo de.como quemar cauchos y manifestaciones, dijo hace días que EL PEOR lugar para iniciar una marcha es en Bello Monte. Era fácil el boqueo por parte de la GN.

      Pareciera que eso era lo que Capriles buscaba. Mi opinion es que era puro teatro.

      Esto que estiy diciendo tal vez no le guste a los admiradores de Capriles, al que yo le sugeriría que se defina en que bando está. Cuando se encargó personalmente de minimizar las otras opciones que estaban en la mesa dejando sólo el RR como la única alternativa.

      Yo en lo particular me cansé de que me vea la cara de poceta. Y con los moderadores y comentaristas de este blog, el cual considero muy serio y distinguido, les pido disculpas por mi arrechera.

      • Capriles swings both ways (and I’m being generous calling it both ways) That much has been obvious for a few years.

        The fact that in 2016 some people doubt this is really stupid.

      • Capriles and most of MUD swings both ways (I’m being generous here calling it both ways) that much has been obvious since 2014. If people don’t see it in 20 fucking 16 they’re beyond help.

      • Capriles lacks direction and magnitude… Vector!

        I do hope he does not consider himself presidential, that boat sailed 3 years ago…

        It is interesting that the clashes between the 4th, the 5th and the upcoming 6th are happening at Romulo’s ass…

        And yes, for 10% of Maduro’s bullshit we would have gotten rid of him in the ’90s.

    5. When it comes to protesting, perhaps the opposition should consult with participants of the arab spring protests. Historically they have a better track record than any Venezuelan protest.
      Ask the the Tunisians!

    6. The student who went all alone to the CNE is today’s fricking hero! The only one with intelligence… The strategy should’ve been MUD main leaders in Bello Monte while small groups, each with a MUD leader, split and go to CNE by different routes… There’s a video from a women ranting and screaming her ass off demanding MUD do not leave the march. I could be her right now…

    7. Capriles: gets sprayed in the face with an annoying substance.

      Lopez: goes to jail for some years.

      I know WHO thought things out better here.

      Lopez guarimbas: terribly timed, seen by most as adolescent vandalism.

      Capriles marches: done at a time where more than one chavista will sympathize.

      My people, stay fucking cool. Truth is I think the marches were a bad idea. You don’t point lances at a mortally wounded enemy, you give them a wide berth and block any route to help. But I also see the idea of putting some pressure. It’s risky, but neither insane nor stupid as other such undertakings have been.

      • Tranquilo, papá, que total, todavía se puede esperar unos 20 años más a que todos los chavistas que quedan terminen de desencantarse y se vote contra la hija del fiambre en un 100%.

        Igual no ha pasado gran cosa, ¿Qué son cuarto de millón de muertos hasta ahora, y qué serán otro milloncito más de muertos en los próximos 20 años?

    Leave a Reply