That chavismo will fight to the death to stay in power is no longer controversial. But chances are high that, in the next 1 to 4 years, they’ll find themselves out. Which brings up a hair-raising question: who’s the most likely figure to bring them back to Miraflores?

Venezuelan parties have a long history of failing to empower the generación de relevo, the breed of younger guys (and yeah, they’re almost all guys), willing to look two, or three, election cycles down the road. Copei basically died because it never managed to solve this problem. AD, weirdly, has managed to not solve it for three generations in a row a succession of gerontocrats, holding back the new players until the biological solution takes hold.

This is one area where chavismo does much better than we do. You can call them terrible despots, even worse rulers, but they are not improvisers – they are working on a prospect to succeed in some three decades.

Out of the up-and-coming generation of leftist lunatics who are likely to take over once the Maduro cohort is out, one man towers above the rest. Héctor Rodríguez was 16 years old, on that long-ago February day when Hugo Chávez was first sworn in as president. Now, 35, he is a kind of laboratory version of the Next Big Thing.

Young, charismatic, and silver-tongued, Hector is a chemically pure product of life in the chavista movement. I mean, the guy named his youngest child after one of Chávez’s bureaucratic dependencies (his kid’s actual name is Inti). [ooops]. Loyal as a dog, he’s blindly devoted to the cause with absolute zeal. He’s also smarter than a bunch of his putative bosses. Quite the candidate for big things.

Nobody expects Rodríguez to win that race, but they do expect him to campaign with gusto, to fight a good fight, and to lose honorably.

Asking some political friends, I discovered something odd: virtually everyone I know quietly, inwardly, takes it for granted that Hector Rodríguez will be president of Venezuela one day. Not soon, you see, but sometime in the 2030s, or maybe the 2040s, he is going to bring them back to power.

At his age, who else has had that amount of ministries under his belt? In 2008, at the tender age of 28, he took over the President’s Office Ministry, even if it was for just four months. In 2010, he was appointed as Minister for Sports, where he stayed until 2013, when he was switched to the Youth Ministry. Nine months later, in January 2014, he became Minister of Education, before being appointed in 2015 as the Vicepresident of the Ministerial Council for Social Development and the Misiones. Next stop was the National Assembly.

His biggest test yet, leading chavismo as a minority in the National Assembly, has been carried out with success. Unlike the typical cero-a-la-izquierda chavista, Hector actually thinks through his argument, and delivers searing speeches that roast the MUD, based more on actual facts and arguments than on ideological bromides it’s weird, nobody else on their side can do that.

He’s got a taste of politics and its lateral network, of course at the top level, both in the executive and the legislative branch. And now, he’s got his own “real first election race”. He’s tasked with improving PSUV’s odds, in the race for Miranda against Carlos Ocariz (everybody’s favorite politician with a lisp). Nobody expects Rodríguez to win that race, but they do expect him to campaign with gusto, to fight a good fight, and to lose honorably.

It’s not a task he’s likely to fail at. All part of a long-term training program. Grooming at its best.

And let’s be honest, he’s not doing a bad job. He’s sticking it to whomever he must in the opposition, climbing further up the ranks of the chavista greasy pole with each shanking. His latest rally was held at El Poliedro, an iconic place for chavista meetings.Usually reserved for those way on top of the ladder. It doesn’t matter that El Poliedro isn’t in Miranda, the state he is running in. At this point, nobody is counting descaros anymore.

Quietly day in, day out Hector Rodríguez is laying the groundwork for a nationwide network that will eventually bring him to power. You can hear the lines being seeded even now Héctor, ese hombre sí trabaja”. He is chavismo’s best, and perhaps only, chance at resurrection.

Write it down.

29 COMMENTS

  1. A thug whose only merit in the sports ministery was to embezzle over 300 million dollars, famous for buying 5000 $ wristwatches and being even more infamous for his crystal clear hatred against the poor people, expressed in this immortal phrase:

    “We won’t help people to get out of poverty so they become escuálidos and turn against us, hahahah!”

    Thusly, the perfect chavista candidate.

    • As a joke nowadays might be accepted but these people are burning bridges and severing any possible line or ties to a future accommodation with any possible alternative government that may come to power in future. They act as if they do not care for the consequences of this regime actions, and the harm it is doing to Venezuela. In a nutshell this country is in the verge of a major outburst of violence of unpredictable dimensions. the worst part is they have no mercy for their victims

  2. Sorry, but I don’t find this article credible. The comments about Rodriguez, his history, and his charisma amongst chavistas is all credible, it’s this crap that bothers me:

    “And now, he’s got his own “real first election race”. He’s tasked with improving PSUV’s odds, in the race for Miranda against Carlos Ocariz (everybody’s favorite politician with a lisp). Nobody expects Rodríguez to win that race, but they do expect him to campaign with gusto, to fight a good fight, and to lose honorably.”

    WTF? The author would have us believe that the 15 October election will be legit. It won’t be. The winners and losers have already been hand-picked to give that impression and apparently some are already taking the bait, hook, line, and sinker.

    • Participating in rigged elections is inane.
      The opposition declares the elections rigged and then bestows legitimacy on the system by participating.
      Maduro’s demand that all governors submit to the ANC or be removed shows that the whole process is a farce.
      The elections are a waste of time and energy. They only become a distraction to the real issues.

  3. At some point I read in the Economist that the worse government of Latin America was Alan Garcia Perez 1985-1990 (I presume his is now outdone by Maduro) and yet the circumstances were such that he got re-elected in 2006. Furthermore, he is the only living Peruvian president not in jail.

    I would not be surprised that Chavismo gets elected again and in fact this Chavista becomes president in the future. The only hope is that democracy is restored and institutions are strengthened.

    Las mayorias se equivocan, y a veces los errores son terribles.

    • I’m not a huge fan of his, but to be fair he was a very different president when he got re-elected. It would seem he was capable of growth and learning from past mistakes and abandoning failed ideologically driven policies.

      Can we say the same about Rodriquez? I think not.

  4. OMG… the Venezuelan version of the Kennedys. “Born to Rule”. (or as the Democrat Party in the US likes to say euphemistically, “Destined for Leadership”)

  5. Sorry to be negative but I view anyone who supports anything socialist as a dangerous murderous psychotic. And this guy Rodriguez is apparently totally locked into that murderous psychosis. Over 100 million dead and billions living in stagnation are the results of that psychosis. That is not power, dynamism, organization, thoughtfulness, and intelligence. It is mass murder.

    • Socialism and almost every religion was invented and is being used to manipulate and suppress the masses! Both are the cancer that plagues our world!

      • I disagree. Religions seek to uplift man to his spiritual nature, and establish a realization of the importance of individual goodness. Socialism seeks to eradicate religions of all kinds – as in Chinese communists machine-gunning Buddhists. One has to ask why socialism would denigrate religions. In socialism, the state, the government, is the “religion”, and that is aimed at enforcement of joint collective activity, not freedom for the individual to choose to participate in collective activity to temporarily assist others in need.

        Religion points upwards, to the heavens; socialism point downwards, to the mud.

    • Just read Solzhenitsyn’s “The Gulag Archipelago” for Statin’s work. But your numbers are off by a factor of ten (I guess the number) when you consider all the regime calling themselves believers in socialism ideals(?)). But, as skeptic, I have to agree Duncanvd on religions. Too many people looking for “promised land”, just look at Venezuela (and a lot other places) for the result.

  6. … with the current setup, why would Chavistas need a new, charismatic (for them) figure to “win” anything?

    I mean, I dont see them at any point thinking about having to depend on anybody to “get back into power” in the ’30s or ’40s. They may be grooming him for something, but sure as hell is not to “come back to power”.

    They dont plant to leave it, ever.

  7. “WTF? The author would have us believe that the 15 October election will be legit. It won’t be. The winners and losers have already been hand-picked to give that impression and apparently some are already taking the bait, hook, line, and sinker.”

    The perfect definition of insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

  8. Allow me a small niggle: I don’t believe Hector R named his son after the land reform institute. I’m guessing he’s called Inti after Guido ‘Inti’ Peredo, a Bolivian guerrilla leader who fought alongside Che Guevara in the 1960s.

  9. “Silver tongue” …holy shit! The standard then must be incredibly low! He is nothing but riding the coats of the dying “revolution”. He will be black-listed once democracy is re-instituted. #byefelicia

  10. Seems like the author is secretly is hoping for him to take hold of power. Haven’t we learned the lesson already? For all intents and purposes, he’s one of the top MAMAGUEBOS of chavismo: cynicism and jalabolismo are his speciality. The dictatorship goes down with him.

  11. That chavismo will fight to the death to stay in power is no longer controversial. But chances are high that, in the next 1 to 4 years, they’ll find themselves out.

    My main qualm with this article. The opposition has been saying this since chavez took power. What makes you thinkl rthat they are going out.

  12. Oh come on.

    If you are looking for a stupid crowd who actually cares the about the fucking rigged faked elections, look elsewhere. We don’ t fucking accept them.

  13. John: I have been reading your comments on here for a good deal of time. From what you’ve opined it seems you and I share a similar perspective and probably not too far apart on the birth year. In my three score and fifteen I too have spent a number of decades toiling for our Uncle Sam. And like you I can not for one moment imagine how a man can stand around, for years, rationalizing and justifying plain cowardice while a psychopath holds his country hostage.

    I have been in touch with my representatives in congress asking they not authorize the spilling of one drop of U. S. military blood to assist Venezuela until Venezuelans demonstrate they are willing, and have the courage, to help themselves. My guess is they will have the same lack of fortitude as the Cubans who fled Cuba vowing to return and remove Castro.

    While the most vulnerable in Venezuela are allowed to die, the pontification of the nattering nabobs continues. Diplomatic pressure indeed. Venezuela only requires three things. A rifle, a scope, and someone with balls enough to use them. The first two items I’m certain they have in Caracas, but the testicles seem to be missing otherwise how could they do nothing while children die…for years?

    • ASA, your points are well taken buy I beg to differ. I’m surprised that you are contacting representatives. You will not make a difference. What will happen will happen with or without you.

      You have a very simplistic and sided view.

  14. Whoever you are ASA/058 you are an idiot!!. Maybe you’ve seen too many cowboys movies. Castro´s dictatorship is a byproduct of a bad agreement reached in Viena to have the missiles removed from Cuba. Kennedy´s government accepted to leave alone Cuba, so this monster had the island to do as he pleased. Get some information before you venture an opinion, not the other way around you ignoramus

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