So Many Ways of Being Violent

For Saturday, June 2, 2018. Translated by Javier Liendo.

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Photo: RunRunes

Very early in the morning, the streets filled with the elderly lining up to try and collect their pension of Bs. 1,400,000, and by order of SUDEBAN they’re discriminated by ID card number. Meanwhile, the official media system announced the payment of the Carabobo victory bonus for Bs. 4,000,000 through the carnet de la patria. During the morning, a group of non-government organizations gathered under the Acción por la Vida network submitted a document before the Interior Ministry, the Prosecutor’s Office and the Ombudsman’s Office demanding that the Executive put a check on guns and ammunition, disabling government policies that increase the presence of weapons in civilian hands (militias and colectivos) and that police bodies cease extrajudicial executions and respect the progressive use of force; all of this with the goal of reducing the figures of violence and break down the way we’ve normalized violence in the country. Over 80% of murders in Venezuela are committed with firearms. Meanwhile, the Venezuelan Observatory of Social Conflict (OVCS), an average of 28 per day: 68% of the protests in May 2018 were to demand economic, social, cultural and environmental rights. It’s serious that 12 people have been murdered in the first five months of the year while protesting: Eleven with bullet wounds and another with a blunt object.

Amazing chavismo

Governor Rafael Lacava announced on Instagram the acquisition of (very old) school buses to try and partially solve the public transport crisis. Using the stir about the issue in Argentina, chavismo announced that on Wednesday, June 20, feminists will submit a proposal before the ANC to discuss the decriminalization and legalization of abortion in Venezuela. Today the ANC “chooses” a new chairman. The campaign on social media in favor of Diosdado Cabello is at the very least laughable. While Maikel Moreno announced the Honoris Causa doctorate granted by the Armed Force University, Crónica Uno pointed out that 40% of TSJ justices had been sanctioned by 30 countries.

Grupo Zoom increased remittance exchange rate from Bs. 1,303,270 to Bs. 2,200,000, far surpassing DICOM’s Bs. 80,000 rate and getting closer to the black market rate. It was revealed yesterday that, Rafael Ernesto Reiter Muñoz, former chief of PDVSA’s Operational Management of Loss Prevention and Control, imprisoned since last October and waiting to be extradited, bought a house for almost € 2.000.000 upon arriving to Spain. That’s why the BCV TV ad announcing the Sovereign Bolivar putting the “State” in a caimanera face to face against its imaginary enemies (International boycott, economic blockade, economic war and attacks on the currency) is a huge mockery. Additionally, take out your umbrellas, Civil Protection warned that in the next 36 hours the country will face heavy rains due to a storm.

We, migrants

A little over 12,000 Venezuelans requested international protection in 2017 in the European Union (EU), taking the 16th place in the requests ranking, a 155% increase compared to 2016, according to the annual report issued by the European Asylum Support Office (EASO). By 2014, Venezuelans only made 100 requests a year. Brazilian President Michel Temer announced that he’ll visit Boa Vista and Pacaraima today to tour some shelters housing Venezuelans which, according to official statistics, are now over 40,000 people, an important majority has allegedly found employment, but there are complaints in Boa Vista about a sizable group (over 6,000) in a vulnerable situation. Mercosur issued two resolutions expressing its concern for Nicaragua’s political and social situation. About us, Mercosur mentioned the “increasing migration flow” that forces countries to “coordinate efforts to offer integral solutions”; calling the government to coordinate with the international community a path to recovery and restating “its will and commitment to support” Venezuelans in the efforts we’re demanding.

Abroad

  • Vice-President Delcy Rodríguez and Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza attended the meeting called by the Chairman of the International Justice Court (ICJ), for Guyana’s claim on the Esequibo. There, they stated their “sovereign decision to not participate in the process” because (according to them) the ICJ has no jurisdiction.
  • The UN asked for the creation of a commission to investigate human rights violations in Venezuela and confirmed that it will monitor the process from the distance due to the gravity and reach of the violations and the government’s refusal to allow the team of the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad al Hussein to access the country. Zeid’s office will publish its second report on Venezuela in the next few days.
  • Ivan Duque was elected president of Colombia with 53.98% of votes. Marta Lucía Ramírez became the first woman to be elected vice-president in her country. Defeated candidate Gustavo Petro gave a poorly democratic and arrogant speech; we’ll have to see how he practices opposition to see whether he truly didn’t reach the presidency “for now.”
  • Ecuador’s Prosecutor General requested precautionary measures against their former president, Rafael Correa, including: an electronic shackle and reporting regime before Court every 15 days starting next July 2.
  • Dialogue roundtables were suspended in Nicaragua because the government didn’t send the invitation letters to the IACHR, the UN and the EU, as agreed last Friday. Additionally, the IACHR announced its support schedule, including the International Group of Independent Experts (GIEI) and the Special Monitoring Mechanism for Nicaragua (Meseni). The GIEI team would start working on the first week of July and the Meseni will arrive in the country on June 25; the IACHR must still solve financing for both projects.

While the FIFA announced they’d open an investigation against Mexico due to the homophobic slogans of its fans in the game against Germany, the World Health Organization published the new edition of its manual of diseases that removes transexuality from the derangements chapter, becoming an epigraph called “conditions related to sexual health,” where it’s now called “gender incongruence”; but it’s progress anyway.

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16 COMMENTS

  1. “Vice-President Delcy Rodríguez and Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza attended the meeting called by the Chairman of the International Justice Court (ICJ), for Guyana’s claim on the Esequibo. There, they stated their “sovereign decision to not participate in the process” because (according to them) the ICJ has no jurisdiction.”

    I remember the time my drunken cousin, who had been picked up for his third DUI (this time in Wisconsin) told the judge that he didn’t recognize the jurisdiction of Wisconsin because his license, car and home was Minnesota, not Wisconsin. He got 30 days in he hoosegow to reconsider. He then lost his drivers license for 5 years, which he complained (jurisdiction!) about to the Minnesota State Attorney General, who I am sure laughed as much as the Wisconsin judge did.

    The point being, it doesn’t matter that he didn’t recognize the authority… everyone else did. Maduro and his Merry Morons can bitch and piss and moan all they want about jurisdiction, and in the end lose and “not recognize” the courts decision… but it won’t matter, will it?

  2. “While the FIFA announced they’d open an investigation against Mexico due to the homophobic slogans of its fans in the game against Germany…”

    A joke, right? FIFA announcing an investigation? Talk about a farce… FIFA has been shown to be one of the most corrupt entities in all sports. There doesn’t need to be any investigation. The proof is there. All that FIFA needs to do is sanction the Mexico team with elimination from the World Cup should one more “iPUTO!” come from their fan section.

  3. Defeated candidate Gustavo Petro gave a poorly democratic and arrogant speech; we’ll have to see how he practices opposition to see whether he truly didn’t reach the presidency “for now.”

    Not a surprise. As Petro considered El Finado to be “a great Latin American leader,” it is no accident that when Mayor of Bogota Petro replicated some of El Finado’s methods, such as acting an an autocratic manner and surrounding himself with yes-men. But those are just the ways “great leaders” operate. 🙂

  4. @Boludo Tejano..my wife’s family in Medellin are greatly relieved that Duque won and are can hardly believe that 8 million people thought the “left’ fork in the road might be the path to take…..unbelievable!

    Mexico votes on Sunday July 1 and ,unfortunately, polls indicate that despite the shining examples of Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua, etc, they want some of that action for themselves. What the hell are they thinking? That it will be different here??

  5. Ivan Duque was elected president of Colombia with 53.98% of votes. Marta Lucía Ramírez became the first woman to be elected vice-president in her country.

    If you look at a map of Colombia, Petro won around the borders. By visual inspection, the biggest correlation of Departments that voted for Petro tends to be distance from Venezuela. Bogta, where Petro was Mayor, is the outlier. Petro carried the Pacific coast and the southwest, which are about the farthest you can get from Venezuela.

    Petro carried none of the Departments bordering Venezuela- though he did get 48.45% in La Guajira. Duque got his highest percentage – 77.9%- in Norte de Santander- the Department with probably the most intimate contact with Venezuela. Cucuta is the capitol of Norte de Santander,

    For the 32 Departments, there was a -.38 ( moderate) negative correlation between % Petro vote and per capita income. By contrast, Petro took only 5 of the 10 poorest Departments. For the 10 poorest Departments, the correlation with % Petro vote virtually disappeared to -0.03. Which sounds as if the poorest of the poor were more likely so see through Petro, while more of the not-as-poor saw Petro as a step up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Colombian_departments_by_GDP
    http://www.eltiempo.com/elecciones-colombia-2018/presidenciales/comparacion-de-las-votaciones-en-primera-y-segunda-vuelta-electoral-en-colombia-231776

    • Hey:

      That documentary mentioned in the article, La Sierra, is available free on YouTube. I just started watching it.

      It was released in 2005, so it’s interesting to watch from today’s perspective.

  6. People here are familiar with the frustration I have regarding the media’s silence when it comes to Venezuela. This morning I was glancing at the UK Guardian’s home page for news of the Americas. There is a separate page for US news. I expected that this page would actually have news of the Americas.
    7 headlines are anti-Trump. One story about Guatemala and one about the elections in Colombia.
    Venezuela is not mentioned. Apparently separating a child from an adult that is caught breaking US law and entering the US illegally is more important than the continued hostage situation and suffering of 30 million people in Venezuela.
    Nobody seems to realize that the simplest way to not have a family separated is to not enter the US illegally. There are 328 points of entry in the Southern US where people can LEGALLY present themselves to request refugee status.
    On another subject,
    I am of the opinion that using the exchange houses to exchange Dollars, Euros, etc. for Bolivars would be a way for the regime that is oppressing the people to obtain funding for continued repression.
    The regime’s inner circle will most likely benefit from these exchanges. There is no guarantee that this money will be used to purchase food and medicine for the people and most likely will benefit the military and regime members.
    Using the black market, that may deal in currencies other than the Bolivar is more likely to result in continued access to products. The food, medicine, or whatever else that is for sale on the market will be replaced from the money that was made from the sales.
    Exchanging currency with the government approved houses may result in that money disappearing into the black hole of corruption.

  7. “A little over 12,000 Venezuelans requested international protection in 2017 in the European Union (EU), taking the 16th place in the requests ranking, a 155% increase compared to 2016, according to the annual report issued by the European Asylum Support Office (EASO).”

    most people asking for political asylum are not persecuted. Most are sifrinos with higher income and dollars, the same that get medicines and food delivered to their front doors and don´t know what shortage is. It is as industry as everything else around here.

    It cost a few hundred dollars to get the ONG testimonies and the documents and signatures that it requires. You pay up and the lawyer or wathever gives you the whole package. I´ve known several people who have been offered the deal, and one of their family members took it. Now he is in Texas supposedly after being “harassed and persecuted for his political beliefs”

    Is all bullshit. Is becoming far more popular among the higuer middle class families who want their sifrino kids to go to the first worl legally. Both Trump and the European Union should just ban every single one of those letters. Real prosecuted people don´t have the resources to get hat bureocratic shit anyways.

    “tu pagas y te montamos la carta”

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