Photo: retrieved

Many Venezuelans only have access to the information the government provides. According to recent studies on public opinion, an important number of citizens only see and hear the propaganda of Nicolás Maduro’s regime, and the economic announcements of August 17, with the perception most people have of their possible efficacy, are the evidence of it.

Economists have repeatedly explained the mistakes and inconsistencies in said announcements but, although the last study by Ratio-UCAB says that 75% of Venezuelans keep thinking that the country’s doing badly or very badly, the assessment for September shows that, for the first time in two years, most people stopped seeing the situation as “very bad.” In July 2018 (a month before Maduro’s economic announcements), 46% of citizens described the country’s situation as “very bad.” By September, this group had dropped to 29%. We’d need to go back to November 2015 in the pollsters’ records to find a similar number.


Studies made by
More Consulting also offer similar conclusions, showing Maduro’s best approval ratings in over two years: 8.7% of citizens describe Maduro’s administration as “excellent,” while 14.9% say it’s “good.” 18% tends to consider it “regular to good.”The situation’s the same if we consider how citizens answered questions about their day to day experience. Only 14% think that their life is “very bad,” a figure that’s only mirrored by that of March 2016. In July this year, before the economic announcements, 25% of citizens said their personal situation was “very bad.”

Maduro’s slight climb in approval is associated with citizens who saw his performance as “bad or regular to bad” in June, and who describe it as “regular to good” after the announcements of August 17.

Even if we observe the data for political self-definition, we discover that the perception dissidents have about the country is (naturally) quite different to that of chavistas, but it also shows few similarities with that of independents.

An important number of citizens only see and hear the propaganda of Nicolás Maduro’s regime.

According to More Consulting’s study, 47% of Venezuelans describe themselves as “independents disillusioned with both opposition and chavista politicians.” On the other hand, 24% say they’re chavistas and 27.4% say they’re opposition.

If we analyze the approval rating for Maduro’s administration by self-definition, we find that 31% of those who describe themselves as chavistas say (after the economic announcements) that the administration is “excellent,” while 37.4% say “it’s good.” 23.9% say it’s “regular to good.”

In the case of independents, perception is far more scattered: 35% of independents see Maduro’s performance as “good.” Among dissidents, 65.7% say the performance is “terrible,” while 17% say it’s “bad” and 9% describe it as “regular to bad.”

The opposition’s worst moment

The political self-definition found in Ratio-UCAB’s study suggests that 36.6% of citizens define themselves as independents, 32.5% say they’re chavistas and 30.9% say they’re opposition. In the last segment, we have the lowest result since January 2017, when 33.7% of citizens said they opposed Maduro’s government. There’s even a breaking point in political self-definition of dissidents and independents due to the new economic measures.

Before, 49.6% of citizens said they opposed the government and only 19% described themselves as independents. After the announcements, we detect a movement from the opposition segment to the independents group.

80% of Venezuelans also say that they’re well informed about Maduro’s economic measures, according to that same study. 68.9% say they agree with the minimum wage hike, 59% say they support the carnet de la patria to receive a subsidy for gas price increases, 62% backs the monetary reconversion (scrapping five zeroes off the currency) and 60% approves the tax increase imposed on private companies.

The only measure that has no support is the VAT increase to 16%. In this case, 60% of citizens disapprove.

What will be the result of these measures? 23% say they’ll solve hyperinflation, while 25% say they’ll solve shortages. 7% declined to respond.

If we consult the perception of citizens about the impact of the economic measures, the results show a triumph for regime propaganda.

In the Ratio-UCAB study, citizens are given four reasons for shortages after the economic announcements. Out of the four options, 56% blame the absence of products on “shop owners who hide or hoard” the merchandise, and 11.7% blame it on the mass shopping of consumers. Only 17% say that shortages are caused “by product prices that are below production costs,” while 9.9% say that shortages are the consequence “of the government’s persecution against shop owners.”

On the other hand, if we consult the perception of citizens about the impact of the economic measures, the results show a triumph for regime propaganda: 18% of citizens say that the country’s problems will be solved, while 51% say that it’s possible they’ll be solved, but it requires patience.

Only 28% are convinced that the measures will fail.

Nicolás Maduro is definitely winning the battle for the perception of public opinion, given the lack of different narratives, other than those offered by regime propaganda. If we’re to take a positive spin on this, it’s the opportunity the scenario provides for those wishing to reach the people.

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66 COMMENTS

  1. So in summary, the people agree with the things the government wants to give to it – a raise, less zeros, discount gas with the carnet, etc, but disagree with paying more tax.

    And it appears that on reasons for the shortages, government incompetence / corruption was not one of the multiple choices. Big miss.

    • Certified Major Official Institute of International Scientific Computerized Artificial Intelligence Studies Data Accumulation and Analysis (CMOIISCAISDAA), Most Recent Poll Results:
      1) Do you think it will rain this year?
      a) Sure 80%
      b) Maybe 16%
      c) No 4%
      2) Will the sun rise tomorrow?
      a) Sure 70%
      b) Maybe 13%
      c) No 17%
      And you get 80% who say they are well informed about Maduro’s economic measures?
      3) Do you understand economics?
      a) Yes 80%
      b) Maybe 13%
      c) No 7%
      4) Does a supply curve intersect a demand curve at any time?
      a) Yes 28%
      b) Maybe 48%
      c) No, I’m not a traffic cop 24%.

  2. There is no middle ground. Either the opinion polls misrepresent public opinion or there is no majority to depose Maduro. Either the polls are right or hunger is not widespread in Venezuela. Mr Martinez suggests that Venezuelans don’t understand economics or are blinded by propaganda but those arguments are suspect because no amount of propaganda or lack of education can overcome an empty stomach.

    • Again, what we have are MORE SPIN DOCTORS ARRIVING AT THE AREPA. This study says this, Dataanalysis says that. I dont buy it. More FALSONISTAS trying to make us move to a “negotiated salida”. Just look at Mr. Martinezes resume, working 17 years for El Universal, the paper that Diosdado owns. That says it all. MR. MARTINEZ IS A SPIN DOCTOR FOR THE REGIME.

      • The spin doctor FALSONISTAS always arrive at the Arepa urging us for more fake elections. That is it. I think most us are not fooled by this.

        Yeah, a big mass of uneducated village idiots here that Poeta can rant on and on about…BUT THIS IS THE EXACT KIND OF GARBAGE I EXPECT FROM GLOBOVISION OR EL UNIVERSAL THAT EVERYDAY HAVE AN ENDLESS PARADE OF FAKE OPPOSITION ON THEIR SHOWS/HEADLINES TO PULL THE WOOL OVER OUR EYES.

        • I do not believe the author of the article is trying to make excuses or promote the regime.I think he is just confirming that they are good at manipulation and propaganda.

          • Ernesto, this is what I was trying to say as NET so well below:

            NET. October 10, 2018 at 11:17 am

            Distrust any market research company in Venezuela (More, et.al) other than DATOS. That said, UCAB yearly household surveys are usually reliable (don’t know RATIO-UCAB). Apart from abysmally-deficient typical Venezuelan understanding of economics in general, the results claimed in this article, if true, may reveal a very short-term (probably now vanished) optimism with the bump-up in minimum wage, apart from the usual Ven. common man bias to respond favorably to/not criticize any Regime measure due to distrust of the questioner/his motives. As someone said above, hunger (most Venezuelans eat at best only 2 meals/da., many only 1 meal/da.) coupled with exorbitant/quickly-rising basic food staples consumer prices, would indicate mass dis-satisfaction with the Regime, which, if allowed to be expressed in free/unfettered elections, would in my opinion easily surpass the 2/3 dis-satisfaction expressed in the last relatively-/virtually only unfixed election (Asamblea Nacional 3 years ago).”

            So not only am I calling out fake opposition, I am calling out bad statistics. Plus Mr. Martinez works for El Universal which is owned by a testifaro of GodGivenHair. They are the definition of fake opposition.

    • Here’s the dichotomy: El pueblo continues to agree with the policies of chavismo, as they have for over a century. They agree with the effects of those policies as they apply to everyone else. Each individual Venezolano only disagrees with the effects of the policies of chavismo as they apply to that individual.

      For example, el pueblo agrees that the plant that processes and sells corn meal is expropriated from its owners. El pueblo disagrees when they can no longer obtain corn meal.

  3. So a lot of polling information reveals what’s at the bottom of the Venezuela mess…highly uneducated masses who are totally ignorant of microeconomics, macroeconomics and their inexorable relationship to political reasoning. But how to provide the needed education? Hell, even in “highly-educated” countries where these relationships used to be taught in schools and universities are, in fact, heading the other way – trying to “dumb down” the education of young people to make them more compliant to socialist notions. I have an idea how this can be reversed in the US, but I have NO idea how this would be done in Venezuela.

  4. If the operation of democracy is dependent on the capacity of the common men to rationally judge a governments economic performance , these results are an indictment on democracy. its not just that people are being systematically misinformed but that they are absolutely lacking in common sense and prone to delusional thinkings which belies what their day to day experience is telling them loud and clear …….Maybe democMracy cant be trusted to define what kind of economic policy govts should follow for the good of all…..because most people are too uneducated to understand how economies work ……..!! Maybe democracy is not natural to people outside the strictly political realm , that it only works were people reach a certain level of education about economic realities .

    • “If the operation of democracy is dependent on the capacity of the common men to rationally judge a governments economic performance , these results are an indictment on democracy”

      No, these results are really an indictment of the rationality of the common man, who apparently is so poorly educated that he incapable of rational reasoning.

      • Dont believe the reuslts, Mr. Martinez is lying!!! HE IS PART OF THE FAKE OPPOSITION TRYING TO DECEIVE!!!

        We should be talking about that turncoat shannonite senator from el imperio who met with dracula and the rest of the fake opposition rather than this bullshit non-story.

        • All this means is that the Chavistas are trying to move to a “negotiated salida” that leaves the constituyente in place. Mr. Martinez just wants to present the Chavistas from a position of power and credibility (based on fake public opinion polls). That is what this is all about and why it shows up now in VenezuelaAnalysis (oh cough cough, sorry, my mistake) Caracas Chronicles.

          The real story what the douchebag senator is cooking up with the Chavistas and fake opposition.

          Never trust a journalist from El Universal. That paper is only good for my cats to shit on (no hay arena para los gatos).

          • If you’ve read Venezuela analysis lately it’s very critical of the actions of the government but it seems that at least the spokespeople of these protests that are going on protests to whoever will ask that they are not against the government that they do not want to overthrow the government and so forth. Maybe it is the case that the opposition is so discredited that most folks do not look for them to come up with anything useful. And most folks do not want Columbian and or gringo troops running around where they live and that’s a very healthy aversion. I have no idea how this is all going to play out and I feel for Venezuela and the people

      • “No, these results are really an indictment of the rationality of the common man, who apparently is so poorly educated that he incapable of rational reasoning.”

        And collective human nature crushes rational reasoning.

        [Clue to BB: people easily “judge a governments economic performance.”]

    • That’s an interesting take Bill: the misinformed opinions of people who live in an authoritarian state are an indictment of democracy.

      I respectfully think you’ve got something inside out here. I hope the success of other similar states like Russia, China, Cuba or North Korea in depriving people of relevant information does not further erode your view of the merits of freedom.

      • Canucklehead hit this one out of the park. It’s easy to blame the public; Poeta’s turned it into a freaking genre. And I will not be one to willingly discount the role of the oppressed in ferreting their own chains. But they’re not the driving force in a system designed to isolate and control them.

        And they can only be blamed for so much when the regime takes pains to lie to them, control them, and insulate them from reality. This isn’t about PR in a democracy. This is about the lies of a tyranny.

      • Whatever the attempts of the regime to misinform the public , the reality of its daily lives is so poignant a message on the regimes failure that such results are a slap in the face on peoples natural capacity for recognizing reality …….maybe because of a lack of education , but its more than that you have to be close to stupid to give anything close to a passing grade to this regimes performance as revealed by the results we see in our daily lives…… Perhaps democracy is demanding of peoples natural intelligence and not the default or automatic way of achieving a reasonable form of governance for even the most ignorant …..There is a book recently published by two american Scholars who spent decades empirically researching how democracy actually works and its conclusion is that the folk view of democracy is a fairy tale , the Book is called Democracy for Realists and maybe many here should read it……., not that democracy doesnt have its uses but too much is made of its virtues and definitely it has limits that cannot be ignored !!

        • Bill, to state what you know better than I do, Venezuela was a relatively stable democracy for a lengthy period of time. Same “pueblo”. Same culture. Venezuela was in fact a democracy during a period in which democracy was not the norm in Latin America. Venezuelans transitioned to democracy during a period in which education levels in Venezuela were nowhere near what they have been in more recent years, and the population was much more rural in composition than it is now. That is to say, democracy in Venezuela was sustained by what some might consider mostly a bunch of rubes. That was not a fairy tale. That was reality. It was a flawed democracy but democracy nonetheless.

          So the historical evidence is that Venezuelans are inherently capable of democracy, and that they are capable of relatively peaceful self-government, not what you suggest. By comparison, democracy and peaceful self government has also failed in countries far more educated and “civilized” than Venezuela, the examples being obvious.

          The most cited authority on democracy in this continent is of course Tocqueville. Look how well the heterogeneous, drooling and easily influenced mob he wrote about managed to sustain a democratic tradition and democratic institutions (!)

          Democracy has no limits – it is not just for some people and not for others. But it is unstable. And it can be recovered. These are all facts supported by history.

          • Democracy doesnt work the way we think ,not here not anywhere….that what the research is revealing (read the work in the book I mention) , but in Venezuela democracy was always a frail plant, It survived because oil money allowed conflicts and incompetence to be papered over , all social segments were bribed to mute down their disatifaction ….and accept living conditions that oil patronage and clientelism made tolerable for everyone…., when the oil money making machine started to falter , pandoras box of repressed problems opened and begun showing their fangs . Democracy existed under ‘hot house’conditions funded by oil money but couldnt live in the open toxic air of our natural cultural climate.
            Doesnt mean that some kind of democracy is possible and even necessary only that its not the delusionally candified democracy that most of us have been taught to believe is natural to people whatever their education or mentality or cultural legacies……In Venezuela democracy after the oil money was squandered democracy imploded into the inept corrupt tyranny we have now .

  5. Polls also showed Clinton beats Trump in a landslide and that the UK would vote to remain in the EU.
    Mark Twain once said “There are lies, damn lies and statistics!”

  6. “I have an idea how this can be reversed in the US, but I have NO idea how this would be done in Venezuela.”

    In the US, it would start with the complete abolishment of the Dept of Education and the return of contol of the classrooms and curriculum to the States and local government where it belong. Keep DC out of the classrooms.

    Here in Venezuela, I have no idea as well. It seems such a daunting task. Where to begin?

    There’s a daily program on Chavez TV, Boza Con Valdez, that focuses on economics and, as you’d expect, it’s purely economics from the leftist standpoint. It’s well-done and informative from the standpoint that they present their arguments in an easy-to-understand format, even though it’s complete leftist bullshit. I’d imagine that the little economic education that the average Venezuelan absorbs comes from that program as I can’t imagine any such classes being taught at a high school level or below.

    • 1. The Department of Education needs abolishment. Along with HUD and Labor.

      2. Marxist economic thought is easy. Just blame the people with wealth. Just don’t ask them the Golden Question, “How do you create wealth?”.

      To the Marxist, the answer is simple. “Take control of the means of production.” (Fields, stores, factories). And as simple as that, seeds and combines and tractors appear… like magic. As does product for the shelves and raw materials for the factories.

    • MR, I don’t see how eliminating Dept of education helps. Example, imagine West Virginia edicating THEIR students providing skills for THEIR local economy, i.e how to wash old dirty coal to be “beautiful, clean coal” which will likely go the way of horse buggy whips sooner than later. Detroit is another example… better to level the old car factories and start over, or manufactuers will build new hitech plants in SC and TN. An independent government agency with a longer view plan for labor needs in a new global economy, and the view being longer than the next election cycle is a bad thing? And let’s keep religion out of this.

      • “Apart from abysmally-deficient typical Venezuelan understanding of economics in general, the results claimed in this article, if true, may reveal a very short-term (probably now vanished) optimism with the bump-up in minimum wage….”

        Net, in addition to the short-term optimism with the bump-up in minimum wage (my woman tells me there’s another that’s been announced, or at least that’s the rumor), the fact that there is now more currency circulating over the last couple of weeks has calmed the masses as well. Remember, not everyone had the ability to use their smart-phone to do a wire transfer to buy a pack of saltine crackers and a soft drink.

        Of course, the new currencly will soon be obsolete as inflation zooms ahead unabated so we’ll be right back where we started. We had our bill counting machine in mothballs for a good while but it’s back out and humming once again.

      • Somehow the above reply got stuck where I didn’t intend it to be. Gringo2, here’s my reply to your comments.

        “I don’t see how eliminating Dept of education helps.”

        With over 3900 employees and a $68 billion budget, gotta be something in there that we can do without, no?

        Look, I understand your point Gringo2, but at least preparing its citizens for their local economies is better in my humble opinion than what we’re doing today which is often preparing them for, well, not sure what. Employers across the country are today complaining about the woeful lack of basic skills in math, science, and even English in those applying for jobs…..especially the better-paying jobs that I’m sure you would like to see our schools preparing local citizens to occupy.

        As for an independent government agency with a longer view for the labor needs, well, we’ll just have to disagree on that one as I believe we’ve got all (and then some) of the government agencies we need. Private enterprise does a damned good job of seeing the future and preparing for it.

        Then, as a final note on this subject, not everyone is college material, nor wants a college education. I’d rather see some of that 68 BILLION DOLLARS in budget of the Dept of Education redistributed to the states (or never taken from them in the first place) and used for upgrading and modernizing of our trade schools. Teach some real skills to those who don’t wish to put in four years in college.

  7. “56% shop owners who hide or hoard merchanise”

    I’m surprised the number is that low actually. We hear it here all the time. “There are galpons full of sugar, rice, pasta, you name it, just waiting for the right price”. Of course, every time I hear that one I can’t help myself and ask the question, how is that with this government being in control since 1998 controlling the ports, controlling the exchange of dollars, controlling the issuance of documents to move products on the highway, controlling the checkpoints, etc, that there are galpons full of merchandise “hidden from the public” just waiting for the right price? How can that be without this same government being involved?

    The result is always the same: Deer in the headlights.

    And what really twists it off for me is that these same ungrateful mother fuckers talk shit, berate, and generally condemn Chinese merchants as crooks. The same Chinese merchants who learn the language and risk their god damned lives to keep their shops open and supplied with what the public needs allthewhile being extorted by the national guard at least once or twice a month because they’re selling butter above official cost. I don’t doubt they make a decent profit, but dammit, they have to in order to keep their doors open after covering all the costs of doing business in this leftist shit hole.

    Alright. Rant over. Back to work. I’ve got 6,000 kilos of white corn arriving today.

    • No doubt you will put that corn in plastic drums and hoard it in order to drive up the price. At the right time you will sell it to the starving El Pueblo at an obscene profit. We know what you are doing, MRubio!

    • MRubio, glad to hear you found a source of corn. I hope you didn’t have to fork out a crazy price for it.

      • Looks like I’ve been busted by Lorenzo.

        Tom, it’s product from last year that the owner has retrieved from the silos. Tough to determine right now if the price is crazy or not, though I’m thinking it’s not outrageous. Every year it’s the same process. Hard to determine a reasonable value right when the harvest is starting, that’s to say, prices are usally all over the place. Once the harvest is underway, the price stabilizes and then usually drifts lower as more product comes on the market.

        The problem this year is that there’s so little corn planted I’m concerned about being left without product. Most of what’s planted locally is yellow corn, which is fine, but I do like to have both types on hand. I’m buying this 6,000 kilos (there’s more available) to have something in case everything else falls through and also because, coming from the silos, it’s super dry, meaning less loss via its humidity, and I can store it in plastic drums instead of the steel.

        With transport I’m paying about 18 bs S per kilo. I’ve been quoted 20 – 25 bs S from a couple of other sources lately, also from the silos. I’m hoping that the price will be in the 13 – 15 range once the harvest starts, but it may be much higher because of the lack of product and inflation. Just don’t know yet what the market will demand.

        Oh, I did have one guy who’s got a good-looking crop on the way to Punta de Mata come by to talk (at my request). He told me he could sell about 20,000 kilos but his harvest won’t be until late next month. He was interested in an advance at 13 bs S per kilo for about 10,000 kilos but my woman shut that one down in a hurry. LOL She doesn’t trust anyone and besides, as she said, if he drops dead, we’re screwed. She’s right, of course. The other risk is I give him the money in advance and when he’s harvesting, the price is double what we agreed. He might be tempted to just sell it at double and give me my money back, which, with inflation, is no deal at all for me.

        Time will tell. I do though expect to buy most of what I want during the harvest, just have no idea yet of the price. One thing going for me is that the guy who’s providing the transport has lots of contacts and always squeezes out the best price possible for me.

        Now I’ve got to drive out to the National Guard alcabala and give them some goodies from the bodega. Why you might ask? Well, we’ve tried to get the official government-required “guide” or permit this morning to move the product but the system won’t let us in. So, the guy doing the transport is delivering a load of fresh water to the GNB, and I’ve been instructed to deliver casave and coffee.

        Venezuela.

        • Fresh water, cassava, and coffee….I guess it could have been worse. They might have demanded some number of barrels of corn in return for permission to transport.

        • Great to hear from you MRubio.

          Another Amazing Chavismo (since Naky has left and the Arepa has gone down the poceta):

          My friend is leaving the country for Uruguay. He needs to get some paperwork done by the rojo rojitos so he can get a work permit there in Uruguy. He is leaving next week. They tell him they dont know when they can get the papers because the printer does not have ink. There were like 40 others waiting in line to get the same papers. My friend say F it and spent 2000bsf on printer ink cartridges etc. for them, now he is first in line and might be able to pick up the papers today.

          Again, amazing chavismo, how we miss you so much Naky, now we got fake opposition running the arepa.

    • Its the “easy answer”, because it requires zero thought.

      I have a former brother in law who insists that there is such a thing as a “100 mpg carburetor” out there, hidden from the public by the Vile Oil Company Oligarchy. He also is convinced that the contrails we see behind jets are actually chemicals being spread by the CIA… he read about it on the internet.

      You can’t fix stupid.

      • Guapo, yes there are quite a few people who believe it the 100 mpg carb and all the other miracle devices on the market that promise to improve your mileage by 30, 40, 50 percent. If I installed all these miracle products on my Chevy Silverado I would have to stop occasionally to drain fuel from the tank to keep it from overflowing!

        • Tom and El Guapo,
          Every vehicle already comes with a device that can lower gasoline consumption tremendously if only consumers were made more aware of it. Manufacturers should mention it prominently in the front of the owner’s manual.

          It is called the ignition key. Keeping the key out of the ignition switch will lead to serious fuel savings every time.

  8. Venezuelans are going to have to eat shit until they understand that it is only item in the Chavista menu.

  9. The PRIMA FACIE reason why the US should not intervene in any fashion in Venezuela.

    When El Pueblo is dying in droves 30,000 dead per month by starvation), then humanitarian aid.

    When El Pueblo is pissing on Chavez grave, then monetary aid for infrastructure.

    When El Pueblo are hanging the likes of Maduro and Delcy/Jorge and Diosdado and Vlad, the colectivos and the apologists on Aporrea from lampposts with piano wire, THEN the world will know that Venezuela wants an end to Chavismo.

    No US military involvement ever, short of Russia/China building a base on the Paraguaná peninsula.

    Like a dog who just shit on the new carpet, El Pueblo needs to have their collective nose rubbed in it. A hard lesson has to be learned.

  10. I agree with ElGuapo and others who affirm my reasoning… They got used to living like they are and most (at this point) don’t know any other way. EOS.

  11. If you, CC’s writers, the allegedly cosmopolitan, well-traveled, English-speaking educated elite, can’t differentiate between Haddad (Maduro’s communist candidate) and Bolsonaro (a democratic leader with an impeccable political career lasting almost 30 years), and just eat all the lies about him (check Quico Toro’s twitter account) with the innocence of cattle heading to the slaughterhouse, what can possibly be expected from the average Venezuelan, given that his ability to find truth is even lower than yours?

    Venezuela is different from most other countries in the West.

    For not having an regular economy outside of the oil sector, the people (everyone, be them rich or poor, educated or uneducated, employee or entrepreneur) believe that wealth comes from the sky (or from the ground), they take wealth for granted, they simply don’t know what it takes for an economy to function properly. Exceptions are the expats like MRubio and the old folks who came from Europe, but most of the others are like the people writing here, who supported Maduro’s candidate back in 2016 at the Peruvian elections. They are always wrong.

    https://www.caracaschronicles.com/2016/04/10/keiko-vero/

    Again, just like the peasants they mock, they also don’t have a clue.

    Venezuela is done, and it can’t be saved because the cultural elite will never understand what’s really going on over there. They are against a military intervention from the US, although they turn a blind eye on the Cuban, Chinese and Russian occupation going on due to ideological reasons.

    My grandfather always told me that his country, Portugal, would only be able to recover after three or four generations die or abandon the country, and that’s exactly what was needed. The bad seeds got assimilated in more developed cultures, and the other rotten apples who remained there just died, making space for real change.

    So, here we are, praying that the bad Venezuelans either disappear in irrelevance in their new countries (yes, brain drain can be good too), or just die. Portugal needed 50 years, Venezuela wil probably need the same amount.

    • That was an interesting read, RadicalizedbyTheLeft. I especially liked the part where Quico described himself as “center right”, though I’ll give him credit for adding the qualifier “in Latin America”.

    • Interesting thought. Very clear.

      “Venezuela is done, and it can’t be saved because the cultural elite will never understand what’s really going on over there. They are against a military intervention from the US, although they turn a blind eye on the Cuban, Chinese and Russian occupation going on due to ideological reasons.”

      The U.S. already had a very significant presence in Venezuela going back to the 1930’s and 40’s, building momentum up to the 1970’s when the nationalization of oil came about. That presence would be, presumably, the end goal of what an “invasion” today would produce: first armed intervention, followed by “pacification” or “stabilization”, followed by civilian occupation doing profitable business in the country, followed by large numbers of civilian “invaders” living in the country, learning the language and culture, raising their kids there.

      The Americans had that, and were invited to leave. Now the Russians and Chinese are building a presence there. It seems to me that this is all part of the same continuum, a decline of capitalist free markets and, unfortunately or maliciously, an ascendance of whatever you want to call whatever is there now. In short, the “dog wagging the tail” in this picture isn’t a movement of armed force in the geopolitical sphere. Rather, the dog in the picture is some form of manipulated sentiment against capitalist free markets. Some say it is all Cuban manipulation, some say it is inbred in the culture in the form of corruption, some say it is inbred in the desire to be dominated by a “caudillo”, some say it is a manifestation of population greed, some say it is the Devil’s Excrement, some say it’s a hatred of “the rich”, and I think undoubtedly it is a mix of all those things and more, a pernicious disease. Whatever it is, it is there, and it seems to totally and purposefully ignore that facts about the number of forced deaths socialism inflicted upon the Russian and the Chinese populations – well up into the many tens of millions, and certainly more than the entire Venezuelan population of 30 some-odd million.

      The socialist solution is to mass murder those who “do not see the shining path” (the notorious destruction of the “Sendero Luminoso” – dressed in drag and wearing lipstick, in Venezuela). The capitalist free market solution is to shake heads and let those socialists emigrate to better economic climates, and let those who remain die off of old age. Maybe that’s one big argument against the capitalist free market advocates, that they prefer to live and let live, and do not kill off the vermin who would infect their production.

      I’m not familiar with Portugal’s history and present, but I guess it would be OK to say “Viva Portugal!” if order is being restored and prosperity is returning.

  12. Distrust any market research company in Venezuela (More, et.al) other than DATOS. That said, UCAB yearly household surveys are usually reliable (don’t know RATIO-UCAB). Apart from abysmally-deficient typical Venezuelan understanding of economics in general, the results claimed in this article, if true, may reveal a very short-term (probably now vanished) optimism with the bump-up in minimum wage, apart from the usual Ven. common man bias to respond favorably to/not criticize any Regime measure due to distrust of the questioner/his motives. As someone said above, hunger (most Venezuelans eat at best only 2 meals/da., many only 1 meal/da.) coupled with exorbitant/quickly-rising basic food staples consumer prices, would indicate mass dis-satisfaction with the Regime, which, if allowed to be expressed in free/unfettered elections, would in my opinion easily surpass the 2/3 dis-satisfaction expressed in the last relatively-/virtually only unfixed election (Asamblea Nacional 3 years ago).

    • “Apart from abysmally-deficient typical Venezuelan understanding of economics in general, the results claimed in this article, if true, may reveal a very short-term (probably now vanished) optimism with the bump-up in minimum wage….”

      Net, in addition to the short-term optimism with the bump-up in minimum wage (my woman tells me there’s another that’s been announced, or at least that’s the rumor), the fact that there is now more currency circulating over the last couple of weeks has calmed the masses as well. Remember, not everyone had the ability to use their smart-phone to do a wire transfer to buy a pack of saltine crackers and a soft drink.

      Of course, the new currencly will soon be obsolete as inflation zooms ahead unabated so we’ll be right back where we started. We had our bill counting machine in mothballs for a good while but it’s back out and humming once again.

  13. “Many clueless Venezuelans only have access to the lies and misinformation the criminal regime provides.”

    Fixed.

  14. If this post doesn’t fully illustrate the complete cluelessness, abysmal lack of education, pervasive corruption everywhere, complicity of most of the worthless populace remaining, I don’t know what does.

  15. This is a great piece.Please keep trolling and write more articles like this eventually turning this blog into aporrea light promoting the right kind of socialism.

  16. And if they are eating just 1/2 meals per day, the pueblo-people’s collective brain power is even more compromised than expected:

    – Zero real education
    – Zero moral values
    – Full corruption, first chance they get. Everyone. Everywhere.
    – Crime, theft, tigritos y segundas, in every city and every pueblo.
    – Millions of idle ‘public employees’ – despicable, complicit leeches. Millions.

    And on top of all that, no protein reaches their stunted, chavistoide brains?

    No wonder Chinazuela is worse than even Haiti, Cuba and most of Africa already.

    In a few years Nicolasno will have 55% approval.
    Because the ‘brave’ pueblo-people are so smart, so-well educated and so honest.

    • as always Poceta Schit, your comments are new, refreshing, intellectually invigorating to add to the debate.. thanks!

      Time to back away from the keyboard go back to the kitchen and prepare your cuima her evening café. what a miserable life you mus tbe living, and you’re not even in Venezuela.

      • Ohh PCshit, in case you missed your own writing, maybe can’t read.. you wrote everyone, everywhere, every city, every pueblo.. where does your rage come from?

  17. The graphic titled “What are the main reasons for the shortages…” reminds me of a new BBC show called Poldark, which is set in 18th century England and has as a central theme the “evil capitalists” vs the dashing socialist leading man. Drives me nuts, but I guess it shows that developed countries are not immune from the siren song of socialism…

  18. “On the other hand, if we consult the perception of citizens about the impact of the economic measures, the results show a triumph for regime propaganda: 18% of citizens say that the country’s problems will be solved, while 51% say that it’s possible they’ll be solved, but it requires patience.

    Only 28% are convinced that the measures will fail.”

    Then again, que sabe burro de pasta’edientes?

    Que sabe pueblo imbecil de economia?

    • And the marxist apparatchiks cash their paychecks and move on to the next created crisis because for them, public perception is the result. Another victory for glorious revolutionary propaganda.

  19. And this exactly illustrate the issue, (once again) about the very flawed assumption that Universal Suffrage would drive countries to prosperity given that The People would always vote in their best interest.
    Problem is, that the overwhelming majority of people (90% plus, name any country) are ignorant about these high minded themes of politics, economy, social issues, etc.
    The honest reality is that we all are born by default ignorant and to learn about these complex subjects takes an incredible amount of time and effort , let alone keep updated on current events with no immediate rewards.
    Another reality is that most people are not interested in politics at all (compared to the few people making comments here and other political forums), hell many don’t even care to vote.
    And the voting statistics shows this fact clearly in almost all Democracies.
    Even more retarded is encouraging other people to vote, when the responsible thing to do is to discourage citizens who are ignorant about these topics to please don’t vote.

    Here in Florida USA, I have to laugh (or cry) at the choice of 43 plus candidates for the upcoming local and midterm elections.
    In the fantasy realm of Democratic ideals every citizen would have to spend 16,512 hours to properly research every candidate (16hrs each) and make Excel sheet tables to compare all of them LOL.!!!
    I want to vote but with what honest criteria should I pick !? The ones who put the most propaganda out, o the ones who have the least?
    Because of these realities I have concluded that most Democracies who have adopted Universal Suffrage will descent into populist chaos and collapse unless something changes.
    It is sad to see countries like China rising at the face of the chaotic and increasingly dysfunctional western democracies.

    • Here in Fla you can go to the beach or work. Fuck the retarded elections unless you are retarded, that is.

    • Unlike Kleptozuela, here in among Civilized Nations, it doesn’t really matter what kind of political animals end up in office. Democrats, Republicans, same shit in the end. Decade after decade. The system of LAWS, education, capitalism and legal accountability is what works, regardless of the bogus politicians from any side.

      Go to the beach, ride a bike. Switch the TV station. Netflix has zero commercials. It all works anyway.

      • Well, Poeta, I guess we have different standards about Politics.
        My post was more about a critique to the Universal Suffrage system more than the US or Venezuela.
        But speaking about the US, I find disturbing and unacceptable that in the past Presidential election we have to choose between two persons in their 70’s well pass retirement age despite the immense talent pool available in this country. It is also unacceptable that the presidential debates are limited to two political parties, no room for anyone else and I guess no one cares. The political discussions are more about personal drama than actual policy, etc, etc

        The fact the fsct that the House and the Senate have not been able to pass any significant legislation in years given the dramatic polarization is worrisome as well.
        Ni immigration Reform, No health Care fix, failure to curb the Debt, etc etc.

        All of this is byproduct of the dynamic imposed by the current electoral system, it is more than a drag and ultimately descent into populism (Check Brexit, Check Turkey, Egypt, etc.
        Why care about fake news, the real issue is lots and lots of low or no information voters.
        Not that I’d advocate for a China political model but it makes a lot of difference when they don’t have to deal with this BS of opinions polls, etc, they just act.

        • The American political system is far from perfect indeed. But it was designed by the Forefathers with some good measure of cleverness and foresight. Notably, checks & balances, Separation of Powers, renewable Republican systems. The amendments.. At the end of the day a bi-partisan Congress is what rules, but it’s made of lots of somewhat honorable, well-educated people. Ain’t perfect, but it has proven to work through the centuries, huh?

          Unlike shitholes like Kleptozuela, it’s more difficult to get away with murder in the USA. Tougher to steal. Easier to go to good schools, That’s why it’s such a great country that produces Skilled, well-educated elites, as opposed to Haitizuela there.

  20. One thing I would like to see now is a model of emigration,
    a chart with the evolution of totals, not percentages now.

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