Photo: 800 Noticias retrieved

For many, councilman Fernando Albán was a total stranger until last Monday, when we found out about the tragedy and mystery surrounding his death. For us, he was “Albán”, our coworker from the Cabildo Metropolitano who paid with his life the Bolivarian sin of being too close to Julio Borges.

Albán was the Executive Director of the Cabildo Metropolitano, a role that sounds more pompous than it really was—especially after Chávez seized the Alcaldía Metropolitana facilities and we were left with an empty shell (literally and metaphorically). Luckily, he was a seasoned funcionario publico with the golden problem-solving skills needed in the new Cabildo: on his first week he had to find an office for 500 people, find venues to run the Council sessions every week, and make up for Barreto’s mess and the horror of the inherited payroll.

He insisted on keeping us close to the power within Libertador, so our new (but not so shiny) offices were just across the National Assembly. A metaphorical middle finger to the government.

Did I mention that Albán, even though he was from Primero Justicia, had to work with all concejales? All of them, including Richard Peñalver (yes, that guy from Puente Llaguno) was one of the councilmen on the chavista bench who liked to air his grievances in Albán’s office.

Albán was the guy who showed us the ropes early in our new jobs: we were the energetic newcomers from the movimiento estudiantil who were about to work in one of the craziest places of the public administration.

He was the guy who sat down and had a working relationship with the chavista unions so the concejales could hold sessions in peace.

The kind of boss whose employees bought a cake for, to celebrate his birthday.

The one who protected us when we were held hostage (true story).

Proof that not all heroes wear capes.

 

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20 COMMENTS

  1. “He was the guy who sat down and had a working relationship with the chavista unions so the concejales could hold sessions in peace.”

    Before praising this guy as a national “hero”, a martyr, unblemished crusader for truth and justice…

    Just because he was on Masburro’s direct payroll, the infamous, endless Nomina Chavista, one must already doubt this guy. Besides his average ‘cara’e’malandro’ face.

    Perhaps I’m wrong. Maybe the dude never stole a single old bolivar. Maybe he never got kickbacks from his Chavista ‘concejales’ buddies. Maybe he never benefited from the countless Chavistoide special favors, gifts or luxuries. But just by being where he was, and working where he worked, If find it hard to believe this guy was an angel. Probably far from it. Just like most of the “pueblo” on the same corrupt payrolls.

    • Hey Poeta, your comment is dripping with ignorance. Just like you, your comment exudes ignorance, like a gangrenous wound, overflowing in stupidity, idiocy and other cognitive and character foils of which -I must admit- you cannot be held responsible, because such lack of brainpower must surely be congenital, as no life experience, as traumatic and lacking in education as it might have been, nor a deliberate and personality-based wanton attitude to knowledge and basic civility, can explain what you are.

      As Executive Director of an opposition controlled municipal council, he wasn’t on Maduro’s payroll. The opposition gained controlled over the Cabildo Metropolitano in the 2008 election, when Ledezma was elected mayor, and got a majority of councilors again in 2013. Sorry to break 2008 news to you. It was no different than working in the Chacao municipal council. He was on the payroll of an opposition-controlled organization. But I guess understating that basic fact is too much to ask of you.

      Having settled that, let me just say that I hope your death is commented as you did above. Especially the “cara’e’malandro” part. Please make sure to ask one of your surely reluctant relatives to let us know when death comes for you -not too painfully, we all hope- so we can eulogize you like you deserve.

    • Poceta I find it hard to believe that someone who can muster so much hate in such short comments can be an upright, honest person. Luckily I don’t need anyone to confirm this believe because I have already read your homophobic comments.

      People like you are the reason I couldn’t grow up in my own country, not one bit different from Chavistas except for the colors you wear.

  2. Hey — remember this was el Cabildo with a vast opposition majority, a chavista union and a crazy payroll from Barreto’s administration. He then became concejal in Libertador (a different body). Hope that helps.

    • Ana, thank you for providing some context on why Albán was in the crosshairs of the dictatorship. But please do not take offence. Poceta Chit cannot tolerate anyone challenging his narrative that everyone remaining in Venezuela (ok, so he doesn’t get confused.. “kleptocubazuela”) is a lying, theiving, ignorant, chabista indian.

  3. “Poceta Chit cannot tolerate anyone challenging his narrative that everyone remaining in Venezuela (ok, so he doesn’t get confused.. “kleptocubazuela”) is a lying, theiving, ignorant, chabista indian.”

    Who said “everyone remaining in Kleptozuela” is a corrupt, uneducated retard like you, Gringo 2?

    Best guess is you went to a real cheap public school, bailed out way before graduation because the crack GF got pregnant, thus moved to Kleptozuela for freebies.

    MOST of the indians are clueless and corrupt. READ, dude, READ.

  4. Was just over at Aporrea.

    According to the true believers, Sr. Albán brought this upon himself. He (and every other non-believer) is at fault for his own troubles. As a matter of fact, the fine young Chavistas at SEBIN had just extracted a confession from him and suddenly, he flung himself to his death (no doubt he could no longer bear the guilt any longer!). Regardless, any malfeasance is not upon the Chavist leadership. Whatever failings, they fall upon some low level FANB flunky at HQ who, in a moment of distraction, allowed Sr. Albán to commit suicide.

    The moral of the story is, “Sorry, but these things happen when you are guilty! He should have confessed earlier. The President of Peace Nicolas Maduro Moro and Chavismo are blameless. These are difficult times and because the Revolution must continue to exist, people might have to suffer.”

    Bolívar and Chávez live! And their struggles and the Homeland that they bequeathed to us continue!
    Ever onward to victory!
    Independence and Socialist Homeland!
    We will live and we will win!

    https://www.aporrea.org/actualidad/a270388.html

    This guy would be among the first to go. Sant Roz would have to watch before he went next.

  5. Isn’t anyone asking why him?

    The mob usually kills for 2 reasons: 1) to send a message, 2) to eliminate evidence/silence the truth. So which one is it? Was this pure intimidation? Or did he know something about the regime that made him dangerous? About PJ? its financing? Is anyone in CC doing some proper investigative journalism and trying to come up with a motive?

    • You’re way overthinking this. And no, the mob doesn’t usually kill for two reasons.

      They just kill because they can, with impunity.

      • I apologize Ira. I was not aware you had invested hours understanding his place within PJ, his ambition, goals, personal projects, bank accounts. His relationship with co-workers, members of the regime. His faults and success over the years. How he became a concejal, who financed his campaign, his political life, who he financed and backed, why. I was not aware you meticulously ruled out every other scenario and very rationally and well in a documented way concluded he was just killed for the sport of it.

        I am sorry, I did not do my homework. I did not know of this vast research or of your cognitive abilities. Please do share your twitter handle or blog URL so that I may in the future simply read your digested truth and not waste time overthinking.. or even thinking really. Why bother?

    • Why was he targeted for kidnapping and “chavista” justice is clear. Opposition member, ties with Borges, member of PJ, all that puts you in the list of people to abuse and jail.

      Why was he killed, who knows. Everything is possible. My bet is that he was tortured, but they didnt plan on killing him (not for any particular scrupules, just that he was more useful in jail); it just happened. So now is cover your ass time. But again, who knows, is not like there is going to be an investigation that one can trust about what happened.

  6. Ana, good report. FA truly tried in an impossible political environment for any Oppo politico (imagine having to work with Penalver!). He died honorably, probably excessively-tortured (rumored water in lungs), perhaps even talking back/defying his torturers (big No No). His death will simply rapidly become one more tombstone marking one of the worst Regimes ever to enshroud the SA Continent, soon to be forgotten in the ongoing litany of travesties soon to come.

  7. thanks Ana for honoring Mr Alban. He truly sacrificed his life for his beliefs and I was very disappointed by the initial CC coverage which sort of treated him like a casual statistic, jyst another victim of chavismo. But he truly was much more than that. He did something that the chavistas found to be dangerous and threatening. He didnt emigrate, he didnt remove himself from politics. In most of the civilized world he would have been regarded as a hero but I find scant evidence here that people accord him that status. Why?
    There seems to be a concerted effort in the replies to divert us readers from a serious discussion of the issues raised in the various stories, sort of a form of sabotage or a filibuster. The point seems to be to provoke disputes at best tangentially related to the stories. The situation is bad and getting worse. One thought would be to ignore replies that lack any serious content. Just a thought. Thanks again Ana for reminding me that, as expected, Venezuelans appreciate sacrifices made in their behalf.

  8. There seems to be a concerted effort in the replies to divert us readers from a serious discussion of the issues raised in the various stories, sort of a form of sabotage or a filibuster. The point seems to be to provoke disputes at best tangentially related to the stories. The situation is bad and getting worse. One thought would be to ignore replies that lack any serious content. Just a thought. Thanks again Ana for reminding me that, as expected, Venezuelans appreciate sacrifices made in their behalf.
    Gmail kaydol

Comments are closed.