The also rans…

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The mystery has been solved: Meet María Bolívar.

Officially, the campaign starts today, but I bet most of you don’t know there’ll be more than two candidates on the presidential ballot. Initially, CNE admitted eight nominations for the October 7th election. At the last minute, neo-PPT placeholder Rafael Uzcategui declined in favor of Hugo Chávez, leaving the final candidate tally at seven.

Public attention will of course be focused on the two with real chance to win, but who are the other five? Are they just tarjetón filler”? What do they stand for, if anything?

According to La Verdad, the five candidates share something beside been complete unknowns and lacking an Internet site: all have some kind of prior relation with Chavismo. Let’s take a look…

Those candidates will have the same amount of advertisement content allowed by the regulations of the electoral authoritah: Three daily minutes in every TV channel (including cable), four minutes in every radio station, half page of a regular newspaper and a full page in tabloid-type papers. Even the use of text messages will be limited to three SMS a week.

Will those five candidates use their space in the media? We are about to find out!

1 COMMENT

  1. I thought that you had to have the support of “x” number of voters to be allowed on the ticket.
    Do these people fulfill that condition?

    They won’t clog up the airwaves simply due to lack of resources.

    In the end the few votes they get are unlikely to come from the Capriles camp.

    • Well some (very) paranoid people believe these ghost candidates are a ploy from the government to steal votes from Capriles. It is true that those who want to run for president by “Iniciativa Propia” need to gather roughly 917k signatures, however, by giving the Ley de Procesos Electorales a quick read, the requiremente apaprently doesn’t need to be fulfilled by candidates backed by a political party, and all the people listed seem to be backed.

      • Mexico’s PRI party did it in the 1980s. 1990s. The Partido Verde ran at the state level with PRI backing. And they’re BACK!

  2. I’ll give Reina Sequera a break. She either meant bolivares, or had some extra zeroes. I like her thinking, though.

    • It’s dollars. Here’s the key quote from her official program, delivered to the CNE:

      “ME COMPROMETO A ELIMINAR LA POBREZA DE TODOS LOS
      VENEZOLANOS. ESTE COMPROMISO SERA MATERIALIZADO
      ABRIENDOLE UNA CUENTA BANCARIA PERSONALIZADA Y DEPOSITAR
      A CADA UNO UN MILLON DE DOLARES ( 1.000.000 $ ) MONTO
      CONSIDERADO SUFICIENTE PARA QUE CADA POBRE SALGA DE SU
      POBREZA MATERIAL.”

      • Confirmed. How many poor people are there in Venezuela? She is gonna need trillions to do this! May be she plans to fotocopy $100 dollar bills. As the philosopher said, la la space…

      • …MONTO CONSIDERADO SUFICIENTE PARA QUE CADA POBRE SALGA DE SU
        POBREZA MATERIAL.”

        Carajo! Yo también necesito un milloncito de verdes. Me declaro pobre!

      • I know what she said (I looked at Quico’s link); I’m saying she probably did not *mean* dollars, or probably did not *mean* to have so many zeroes.

  3. F.T.: Good Rundown. Difficult choice between any of these and Chavez himself; they’re all of about the same coherency coefficient.

  4. I don’t see this about votes their all Chaves. What I see is a 6 to 1 ratio in advertizing. You know this is going to be a six headed Hydra. The other question is how their going to deal with news items, opinion and La Cadena.

  5. There are marginal and off-color candidates in every election in any sort of competitive democracy; there’s nothis “Venezuelan” at work here. The key to this is that, despite there being a number of challengers to Chávez, the opposition camp has no splits, like those of 2010. I applaud Gustavo -not Quico, this time- for bringing that up.

    Moreover, the Evangelical party reminds me of some interesting facts: the only party that will appear on this tarjeton, besides the PCV, which had also appeared in the decade before Chávez became president is the Pentecostal party ORA. They split over the party heads’ adamant support of Alfaro Ucero in 1998, as the Pentecostal vote was mostly chavista. Could this muster something against Hugo this time? I’m unsure: some of the party wanted, mostly, key recognition for Venezuelan Evangelicals -who feel as an impoverished minority- but some had made a leap toward an anti-marxist, pro-market, protestant ethic kind of language.

    I guess they could not get attached to the MUD, given that there are too many ostensible Catholics there… But their target is popular areas: whose potential electorate will overlap with that of the Pentecostals?

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