Joaquín Crespo is missing

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Portrait of Joaquín Crespo, two times President of Venezuela
Arturo Michelena’s portrait of General Joaquín Crespo, two times President of Venezuela (1884-1886, 1892-1898)

The family mausoleum of 19th century General and President Joaquín Crespo (1841-1898), located in Caracas’s main public cemetery (Cementerio General del Sur) has been found empty.

The remains of Crespo, his wife Jacinta (of “Misia” fame) and other family members are unaccounted for, according to the municipal office in charge.

The desecration of graves is a common problem in the cemetery, where overall conditions are notoriously sketchy and security is very bad.

Before becoming President, Crespo became War Minister to Antonio Guzmán Blanco in 1876, the very same year when the cemetery was opened.

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1 COMMENT

  1. So uh, can someone tell me with certainty where either Crespo or Chavez bones are today?
    Is this deja vous all over again?

  2. This reminds me of the assumption by all those gringos pendejos who have bought into the romantic fantasy that Venezuela has been traditionally ruled by a class of entrenched landed aristocrats that many of the strong men who ruled our country came from very humble backgrounds , people like Paez , Monagas , Crespo , Gomez , Perez Jimenes had common class origins . Crespo was a shoeless peasant boy who fell in love with the uniforms and the horses and displayed weapons of the armed possie that came to rest close to his dirt floor home and asked for his mother’s permission to join them as a kind of bugle boy later to rise as a War Lord of firt importance !!

  3. Venezuelan style! doesn’t matter if he was a war lord or whatever…. he was a mess as our “liders” usually are

    • You can stick your Usually to wherever you want. I see no reason to diss the guy.

      General Crespo had the best features of a plainsman: personable, talkative, imposing and, surprisingly for his time, teetotal and a faithful husband. As president he’s credited for trying his best to rule as Guzman Blanco did without the vanity factor, and kept very good foreign relations with all European and American countries. His untimely passing is reckoned by historians as a milestone in Venezuelan history, for this triggered the impossibility to hold presidential elections in 1902, the beginning of the end to the Liberal Party and the rise of the Andeans to the political arena.

  4. Many years ago, like 20, I went to a burial at Cementerio General del Sur with my uncle. As we went in, he noted that his aunts tomb could not be seen from the entrance road any more, because there was a new building in front of it. After the burial, we walked over to visit the tomb. Unfortunately, the new administration building of the cemetery had been built on top of the tomb. To this day, it has been impossible to find out if her remains are below the building or were moved somewhere else.

  5. That’s why my revered Cabrujas always said Venezuela was not a country… But a hotel. A weird one I must say. Not funny ha ha but funny weird. A dark version macondoish of Alice in Wonderland.

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