Depreciated

Funeral bells begin to toll for the bolivar as a currency as the BCV tries to justify its failings with U.S. sanctions. Protests erupt in Zulia as electric crisis continues. The AN estimates when free elections could be held. Diplomats leave UN General Assembly during Arreaza's speech. ELN marks homes in Tachira and the FAES has murdered dozens of people in three months.

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There’s Already an Airbridge from Venezuela… to Export Drugs

A thorough report by a CNN team sheds light on the “cocaine superhighway” that connects Colombia, Venezuela, Central America and the United States, revealing details about Venezuelan high-ranking military officers’ deep involvement in drug trafficking.

Learning Barrio Politics at the Burning of Judas

On Easter, Venezuelan barrios and villages choose a prominent political figure, build a doll, and burn it to mark the end of the Holy Week. The press usually covers it because the custom registers who the population is blaming for its problems. This year, Guaidó had his baptism of fire, along with Maduro and Trump.

The Art of Having Fun In A Powerless Maracaibo

The young people at Venezuela’s second city have to work hard to carry on with their lives amid the chronic blackouts. This is how they manage to have some sort of night life or event to watch Game of Thrones.

The Regime Must Be Treated Like The Criminal Organization It Is

Most of the world acknowledges Venezuela as a dictatorship. But not enough people see chavista officials like the criminals they are. A post in America’s Quarterly says that in order to achieve a peaceful transition in the country, the international community must start dealing with Maduro and his allies like the the police deals with mobsters.

Inside Ciudad Guayana’s Illegal Gold Retail

The gold rush in the south-east quarter of the country is helping all kinds of people deal with economic hardship. But gold in grams is replacing the legal currency and the criminal industry has found another realm to control and get profits

Sidetur: Another Company Expropriated and Bankrupted in Revolution

Siderúrgica del Turbio S.A., a steel processing company in Barquisimeto, is one of the 1,000 companies nationalized in 20 years of chavismo. Currently, none of its plants are operational. This is one of the stories behind unemployment, the talent drain and the shortages that destroyed Venezuelan economy.

Previous Posts

Reporters Without Borders Confirms the Fast Decline of Venezuela’s Free Speech

In their 2019 World Press Freedom Index, Reporters Without Borders shows great concern for the state of press freedom both Venezuela and in Latin America as a whole, as threats are not only increasing, but also diversifying

The Great March

Today, Caretaker President Juan Guaidó spoke to a crowd in Chacao, Caracas. His call: the definitive end of usurpation, starting with a great march on May, 1st. Here's his full speech.

Berkeley Awakes to the True Extent of Venezuela’s Crisis

For decades, the Berkeley campus of the University of California has been a mecca for the American left. So, for it to gather some important voices on Venezuela who are not part of the regime’s propaganda network meant an opportunity to discover the awful truth of a country in crisis. Can it open some eyes?

Maduro Uses Paramilitary Forces to Repress the Poor

Venezuela’s dictatorship uses masked armed civilians to do the dirty work. Colectivos control food sales and now they’re the main repressive body against anti-regime protests, much harder to prosecute by the justice system and apparently without limits of any kind.

The Traces of Corruption

CNN published a report on drug-trafficking routes between Colombia and Venezuela. The U.S. imposed new sanctions on the Central Bank and will allow U.S.-based companies to file suits for confiscated property in Cuba. Russia investigates robberies in the construction of an assault rifle assembly plant. The Red Cross continues delivery of humanitarian aid. Guaidó calls for new open assembly on April 19th.

Amid the Blackouts, Remaining Businesses Barely Survive

After a month of chaotic blackouts, and without any solution in sight, a once powerful industry is finding it increasingly hard to cope. From former industrial strongholds to rural towns and crop fields, businessmen do their best to survive, but the consequences are impossible to hide.

At the Sandy Limbo of Maicao

60 tents from the UN refugee agency now shelter hundreds of Venezuelan migrants on ten acres of scorched and sandy desert outside the Colombian city of Maicao. In the coming months, this encampment will quadruple in size.

Chavismo Is Failure

Maduro celebrated a Barrio Adentro anniversary the exact day the humanitarian aid arrived to fix the mess Barrio Adentro caused. The Central Bank managed to sell gold despite the sanctions, making the bolivar bleed out in the process. The AN will step up will step up and try to keep track of our tragedy.

What Do We Talk About When We Talk About U.S. Sanctions...

The measures that the U.S. and other countries are applying to pressure the dictatorship from abroad are not the cause of Venezuelans’ suffering. But they will have an effect in the near future. This is how the sanctions look when we analyze them for the sake of truth and not propaganda.

Maduro Is Weaker Than He Seems

We are focusing on how long the regime has resisted and how impatient the opposition is on Twitter, while an important threat for the Venezuelan dictatorship emerges: the information on the criminal deeds of Maduro and his cronies coming to the hands of the U.S. from Hugo Carvajal.

Even With Repression

Protests continue to rise in Venezuela despite a increasing regime repression. U.S. State Department releases fact sheet on Maduro's criminal track record. Canada included 43 individuals connected to Maduro to their sanctions list. The Lima Group releases another statement specifically addressing multinational organizations and calling out China, Russia, Turkey and Iran for their continued support for Maduro. On World Art Day, Notre Dame cathedral burns.

Under Threat and Repression, Venezuelan Journalism Thrives (UPDATED)

Chavismo is on a campaign to shut down freedom of expression, targeting international and national media outlets to keep quiet what's going on in Venezuela. The irony is that, while this goes on, Venezuelan journalism shines.

Despite the Checkpoints

Caretaker President Juan Guaidó spent the weekend in mass rallies in Zulia and Punto Fijo. Holy Week will be long and improductive by decree. Pompeo has had meetings in Chile, Peru and Colombia. The Red Cross announced they’ll increase their original budget for humanitarian aid in Venezuela

Electronic Nomads: The Life of a Venezuelan Freelancer

After the blackouts on March 7 and 25, the life of the Venezuelan freelancer has become even more difficult. Many have lost the jobs that support entire families, because workers can’t deliver on time, while others have improvised homemade devices to get energy. Others prowl the city hunting for electricity and internet signal.

The Struggle to Get Back Online

Like Maracaibo and Merida, Barquisimeto is one of those Venezuelan cities where power has been more off than on since March 7th. Our man there sent us a short report on how it is to live off the grid, against your wishes and needs

Rural Areas in Zulia Have It Worse Than Maracaibo

Machiques de Perija and the Guajira are the areas affected the most by the blackouts, as most of the region has been more than 20 days without electricity. This will result in more economic contraction and more violent protests.

Venezuela Falls Under the Triple Attack of HIV, Tuberculosis and Malaria

Seventy three deaths by measles only. Zero improvements for the patients of the more grave diseases. The update of the “Triple Treat” 2017 Bulletin by ICASO and ACCSI is another sign that Venezuela is a menace for the region.

Malta and Empanada

Juan Guaidó visited José Félix Ribas in Petare while Maduro reminisces about the events of April, 2002. Reuters published a report on the collapse of production in Venezuela due lack of electricity and water. Hugo "El Pollo" Carvajal was arrested in Madrid and SEBIN arrested four BCV employees who met with Guaidó at the AN. UN officials express growing concern for the humanitarian disaster in Venezuela. the U.S. Treasury Department expanded its sanctions list.

Debunking the Myth of the Cuban Medical Mission in Venezuela

Chávez’s government made of Misión Barrio Adentro one of the main tropes of its worldwide propaganda success. But that program was really a fiasco, instrumentalized by its creators: castrismo officers with proven experience in selling a lie for decades.

What We Can’t Pay For

86% of Venezuelans don’t earn enough to cover their needs, according to a Consultores 21 survey. IMF and World Bank are ready to lend a hand. Ecuadorian embassy in London withdrew Julian Assange’s asylum yesterday. Russia defended Maduro in the UN and Maduro sent oil to Cuba again

What Life is Like in a Paralyzed Country

Since March 7th, almost all Venezuela, including its capital, has been trying to survive without electricity, internet and running water at the same time, and also overwhelmed by shortages, hyperinflation and crime. This is what life would be like under such conditions.

A Victory at the OAS

Gustavo Tarre Briceño is officially the new Venezuelan representative to the OAS. New members of PDVSA’s ad hoc board of directors were appointed. A full report about the Pemon massacre in February was presented in the AN. Pediatric transplant patients are dying in hospitals. Michelle Bachelet said she’ll come, but didn’t say when.

A Heartbreak: What Chavismo Is Really Doing to Us

Venezuela’s collapse is usually seen through headlines or figures, and we don’t get the chance to see what it all means and what it does to the ones who endure it. No matter how privileged you think you are, it will all get to you.

The Blackouts that Changed Our Lives

In Barquisimeto, 400 km west of Caracas, we haven’t escaped the longest blackout in Venezuelan history. We have survived for a month with no electricity or water, it’s been an emotional roller coaster caused by the lack of basic services.