The best system for annoying voters

Another proof of the CNE’s efficiency: Doubling down on an expensive and useless logistical bottleneck

The CNE and the Chavernment keep insisting over and over again that Venezuela has the “best electoral system in the World”. I consider that statement a lie, pure and simple.

What I can say to prove my point? Well, on October 7th I waited four endless hours to cast my vote. I wasn’t the only one: either in the capital or in other states, many people were stuck waiting in line for hours on end.

Defenders of the CNE will point to the high turnout of that day. But reality indicates that an unnecessary element was the responsible.

The Electoral Information Station is a “checkpoint” for big electoral centers (three tables or more) where voters were forced to pass and be informed about the table and page of the voting roll where they’re located. Nothing wrong with that in theory. However, that information can be found by voters themselves either on-line or in the lists put outside those voting centers.

It took all day for the CNE to realize of its screw-up. One of the board members declared that using the station was “optional”, which made the process smoother in the afternoon. After the process was over, the electoral authoritah decided to review such station. The opposition has asked to get rid of it but the final decision has gone the other way around.

The station will continue for the December 16th regional elections, but with more laptops.

Talking about missing the forest for the trees: The information station is not needed, except, perhaps, as a tool for chavista insiders to know in real time who has voted and to help them round up their supporters. Other than that, it’s a waste of money, energy and time. Just when the comandante presidente has pledged more efficiency, this is just the opposite.

This bizarre fixation of the CNE with technology makes them more disconnected of the voters they’re supposed to serve. But maybe that’s the whole point. Just ask Socorro.

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